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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (Jan.-June 1921)"




CALIFORNIA *" 

RARY. 



E007 12025b3 D 

California Slate Library 



Accession No. 

Call No....fX<kQ.?A... 







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Established July 20 18S6 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 1921 



AND 

(fialifnrtua AfottprttBfr 
$5.00 PER YEAR 




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WITH 

1921 

FEATURES 

A Careful Study off the New Models 
Nowon Display Will Prove Interesting 

LATHAM, DAVIS & COMPANY, INC. 

Van New Ave. at Washington St, San Francisco 

Broadway and Piedmont, OAKLAND 
270 W. Santa Clara SU SAN JOSE 



• mam* 



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THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

1174 Phelan Building, San Francisco 

Has a practical system of placing manuscripts for 
publication, which is important to people who write. 

Frank criticism and competent revision are also 
available. 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formeily G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORIE - McLAREN CO. 

FLORISTS. NURSERYMEN 

and 
LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Maleo 

Phone San Mateo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



CLOCK 
REPAIRING 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specially 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

country. . . • •, •■• 
We canry Ian." attractive; lme;of 3ie,v/".clor3ts 
•Wort •\iaranteeci"in every" 'detair 

. . CALIFORNIA; CLOCK; <jQ.\ • . • • ; ;: 

418-f?' Hftife3y}SljgJ • , : l#:GeaVy'.si-ett' 
Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping, Manager 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St. 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 
Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund _ 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



Aggregate Assets. 30th 
Sept. 1919 




$ 23,828.500.00 
16.375.000.00 

23,828,500.00 

64.032.000.00 



$377,721,211.00 
SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

351 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian Stales. New Zealand. Fiji, Papua (New 

Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn.. Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENG; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30. 1920 

Assets _ $66,840,376.95 Capital Actually Paid Up $ 1,000,000.00 

Deposits _.._ 63,352.269.17 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,488,107.78 

Employees' Pension Fund $330,951.36 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President A. H. MULLER, Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL, Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A II. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys 



BOND DEPARTMENT 








Sutter 


and Sansome 


Streets 


THE ANGLO AND LONDON 


PARIS 






Phone Kearny 5600 


NATIONAL BANK 








San Fr 


ancisco. 


Calif. 


OFFERS... 














Ji selection of eight corporation bonds, to yield jrom 


7', 


to8< 


; on the 


investment. 




The term of these various issues is from one year to fourteen years, 


thus meeting 


the re- 


quirements of every investor. 














Our service is at your service. 














'Detailed injormathn on request. 














For Income Tax Exempt {Qonds, as 


\ for Circular T. 


E. 











48493 





ITER 



VOL 



=££ 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 1921 



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No. 






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UTTLE ROOM FOR EXPANSION 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 1. 1921 



DIToMAL 




The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second- 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Company, 30 Cornbill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rales (including postage) : One year, $5.00. Foreign : One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

The people of San Francisco may be a 
Accurate Figures Needed step nearer to the settlement of the 
street railway problem, which has been 
such a serious detriment to the progress of our community for many 
years. The Railroad Commission has given its approval to the plan 
proposed by the bankers' committee, named in August, 1916, to 
work out a solution of the reorganization of the United Railroads. 

For the past twenty years in San Francisco the most popular 
politicians have been those that talked loudest of tearing up all 
railroad tracks and burning all cars except such as might be publicly 
owned. The inevitable result of that anarchistic spirit has been that 
our taxpayers are cursed by two street railroad systems, which 
instead of being mutually beneficial are the opposite. The publicly 
owned railroads with the exception of Geary street, have been buill 
rather to benefit politicians than property owners, and our munici- 
pality has persistently carried out a policy of driving the United 
Railroads into bankruptcy. 

Never, in any civilized community has there been exhibited by a 
city government a narrower, and more unjust plan of ruining a 
business rival, than San Francisco city hall politicians have directed 
against the United Railroads. On the great business thoroughfare 
of San Francisco, the privately owned car company has been 
deliberately robbed of its franchises, on pretense of public benefit. 
There was no question of the legality of those franchises. The 
United Railroads had acquired them openly and in a lawful manner 
and possessed the right to use Market street for its tracks. There 
was in fact no room for any other company's tracks, and to con- 
struct any more was practically to change the fine character of the 
broad street. Nevertheless the municipality went ahead and 
blanketed the lines of the United Railroads on Market street so that 
its patrons' lives were placed in jeopardy when trying to enter or 
alight from its cars. The city lines on either side of the blanketed 
tracks, preventing many passengers from taking the United Railroad 
cars, must have robbed that corporation of an enormous sum. 

It is only fair to the merchants and property owners of San 
Francisco to say that they protested against the crime against the 
stockholders, and the outrage on the pedestrians who flock in such 
numbers to Market street at all hours. The politicians in authority 
at the city hall treated all protests with characteristic contempt. 
To insure contemptuous reception by the municipality of San Fran- 
cisco, a protest needs but the endorsement of the real taxpayers of 
the community, the men of good business status, the men who 
represent what is best in their city and not what is worst. 

Through the efforts of the city hall politicians to destroy the 
United Railroads and build up an irresistible political machine in 
San Francisco, a great many innocent and honest people were 
ruined. The stocks and bonds they had bought in good faith, 
believing in the future of San Francisco were greatly reduced in 



value. The bankers' committee which has been endeavoring to find 
a satisfactory method of reorganizing the finances of the United 
Railroads, suggests a reduction of nearly $35,000,000 in the bonds 
and almost $1 1,000,000 in the capital stock. 

The individual losses sustained by people who bought United 
Railroads securities in good faith, though deplorable, are trifles 
compared with the public loss by injuries to the corporation which 
much react on the efficiency of the service it can render our city. 
A street railroad enterprise, like any other legitimate undertaking, 
must be financially strong and alert to continue its betterments. 

The time has arrived in San Francisco for open and candid 
examination of the street railroad problem. The municipality has 
done almost all it can to bankrupt the privately owned railroad so 
that its assets can be gathered up at a bargain. 

Expenses mean nothing to politicians in running a street car 
system. If they run behind in the receipts they simply charge the 
deficit up in the tax levy. Increases of the wage scale mean nothing 
to the municipality, for the public must pay them and the political 
mr.chine will vote to a man for them. Therefore it means little to 
politicians to acquire railroads. 

It has been evident to the taxpayers of San Francisco for some 
time that a radical change is necessary. If we cannot have two 
satisfactory street railroad systems — one private and the other 
publicly owned — how can we unify them? The simple plan would 
be, of course, to consolidate. But on what terms? That is the 
nub of the proposition. 

The first step should be the thorough enlightenment of the public 
mind. Instead of the Municipal Railways being practically a private 
snap for city hall politicians let us have a thorough financial exam- 
ination of its affairs. Let us spend some money on expert service 
to see how it stands, when every item is figured out like any first 
class private corporation would figure it. 

The public suspicion is that our municipal railway system in San 
Francisco is a losing proposition, which will steadily grow worse 
for the taxpayers that have to foot the bills. There should be no 
secrecy about such affairs. 



The California Liberator, of the Anti-Saloon League. 
Pussyfooting which is published in San Francisco, and misses no 
opportunity to depict this city as something which 
would have caused Sodom and Gomorrah to look to their laurels. 
is disloyal to the memory of the late Dr. D. M. Gandier. and unjust 
to that staunch Dry, A. J. Wallace of Los Angeles. 

It may be remembered that Mr. Wallace ran in the primary 
election against Samuel M. Shortridge, and was defeated by that 
staunch Republican from San Francisco in a most impressive 
fashion. For thirty long years Mr. Wallace has been a satisfactory 
representative of all that the Prohibition party stood for. but as he 
had the ill luck to suffer inglorious defeat at the polls, the California 
Liberator now shamelessly asserts that he put himself in the race 
and was not encouraged by the Anti-Saloon league. 

This indeed must be a dash of cold water down Mr. Wallace's 
spine. Almost the last act of Dr. Gandier before his death was to 
announce in the California Liberator's columns that Wallace was 
the man of all others who should be named for Senator, and helped 
in every way to secure the Prohibition vote. He did receive the 
Dry support in the primary election but it was such a miserable 
minority his backers can only save their faces by some very sly 
pussyfooting. 

It is all the more necessary to pussyfoot, as the Drys put James S. 
Edwards in the senatorial finals when Wallace was slaughtered. 
Edwards was expected to win by 150,000. He received only a 
measley 57.000 votes. In the 1918 election Edwards ran against 
Frank Jordan, Secretary of State, and received a vote of 140.000. 
but the tidal wave of aqua pura was then at peak. 



January I. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Tidal Wave of Immigration 

By Anthony R. Eldridge 



THIS is a bad year for prophets. They 
told us that labor would be in such de- 
mand in war-torn Europe no immi- 
grants would seek our shores for years to 
come. The rising tide of immigration is 
astonishing New York. Immigrants are 
pouring in as they have not done since 1914. 
Only the lack of shipping accommodations 
is restraining them. Between two and three 
million Italians are waiting now for passage. 
In Poland three hundred thousand are 
begging to leave their country for America. 
Nearly thirty thousand immigrants reach 
New York every week. More are coming in 
one month now than during the entire war 
period. The types are declared to be better 
than formerly. They have better clothes, 
more luggage and more money than ever be- 
fore. It is not Europe's dejected and poverty- 
stricken we are getting now, but those who 
have something to go on. Otherwise they 
couldn't reach us, for getting across the 
Atlantic is a costly undertaking now. Before 
the war a steerage passage could be had for 
$25. During the war it was possible to cross 
for $10. Now the rate from Hamburg to 
New York ranges from $120 to $160. and, in 
rddition, there is a head tax of $18. This is 
a considerable sum for the European peasant. 
Jews and Italians are coming in the greatest 
numbers. Czechoslovaks and Greeks are 
also numerous. British subjects are arriving 
in greater number. 

As usual with European immigrants com- 
ing to the United States most of them desire 
to locate in the large cities. That is pre- 
cisely the kind of immigration of which the 
United States stands least in need. The 
percentage of people engaged in American 
agriculture has been falling steadily from 
1820 to 1910. The figures are: 

1820 87.1 

1940 77.5 

1870 47.5 

1880 44.4 

1890 39.2 

1900 32.9 

We may expect for 1920 a lower percent- 
age than for 1910. It will not be surprising 
if the complete returns show that only 30 
per cent of our workers are farmers. 

Notwithstanding the immense immigration 
which has |xmred into North America this 
country is still far below the a\eragc densil> 
of population of the world. The average 
density of population is 28.5 per square 
mile. North America's average density is 
only I 5 per square mile. Europe is the most 
densely populated having I 1 4.5 people per 



square mile, while Australia has only 2.45, 
the smallest proportion of any country. 

The total population of the earth is 
1,699,000,0000, according to the latest 
edition of the Gotha Hofkalender. The 1919 
estimate was 1,646,000,000. The eastern 
hemisphere, including Europe, Africa, Asia 
and Australia, has 1,494,000,000 people, 
while the western hemisphere — the Americas 
—has a population of 205,000,000. 



AN INTERESTING and unexpected la- 
bor development has taken place in 
the Ford .plants. Instead of reducing 
their forces 25 per cent, as did most of the 
Detroit automobile plants in the last two or 
three months, the Ford managers cut the 
working week to five days. Not only Sunday, 
but Saturday also, is a holiday for Ford em- 
ployes. When the reduction was made pro- 
duction increased, the Ford engineers report. 
During the last month, running but five days 
a week, the Ford plants turned out more 
finished products than they ever did in any 
month of six-day weeks. Two reasons are 
ascribed for the impetus to efficiency. One 
is that the workmen in the Ford plants can 
stand a faster pace for five days. The other 
is that the intrinsic value of a good job in 
Detroit has grown and the workman is more 
eager to hold it. 

In Cleveland a number of industries report 
a similar increase in efficiency of production. 
As is usually the case, the shiftless and least 
desirable workmen have been let off first. 
All of the Great Lakes region industries have 
been obliged to tolerate a certain percentage 
of inefficient labor during the period of labor 
scarcity. 

Other Detroit manufacturing concern* 
have not followed the Ford example in re- 
ducing the working week and keeping all 
their employes on the payroll. Most of them 
have reduced forces at least 25 per cent or 
have suspended production for an indefinite 
period of time. 

A tone of confidence prevails in these 
Middle Western manufacturing centers, in 
>pile of the drastic retrenchments. 



THE PROJECTED AUTO FERRY 

With the lease for docking space on the 
Oakland Mole formally granted by the City 
of Oakland, plans for putting in operation 
the new automobile ferry between San Fran- 
cisco and Oakland are progressing rapidly in 
the hands of the Six-Minute Ferry company 
executive?. 



Stock for the new project is said to be 
selling rapidly, and President Forbes H. 
Brown believes that with large sums of 
money becoming available for re-investment 
January I, after bearing interest up to the 
end of the year, fully fifty per cent of the 
entire stock issue will have been written by 
January 10. 

Entrance of a second company into the 
business of transporting automobiles from 
San Francisco to Oakland and vice versa 
has been greeted with a great deal of ap- 
proval by the leading distributors and 
dealers of the bay district. 

Phillip S. Cole, Haynes distributor for 
the State and president of the Haynes Auto 
Sales company of this city, is one of the 
most enthusiastic ones who have commented 
upon the project. He predicts the addition 
of a new line will stimulate additional traffic 
which will double the number of cars now 
transported between the two sides of the 
bay. 



— Society from town motored down to 
San Mateo Tuesday to join the peninsula 
colony at the dance at which Harry Hunt 
was host at the San Mateo Polo Club Tues- 
day evening. It was a delightfully informal 
affair and one of the gayest parties of the 
holiday season. 



We Specialize in 

Broken Hills Stock 

Now Selling at Bottom 

And other 

Active Nevada 
Mining Issues 

Lblcd on the 

San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Your business and inquiries solicited 



G. L Arrowsmith & Co. 

Mcmbcn S. F. Stock Exchange 

117 Rum Bl 

San Francisco. Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 1, 1921 



Does Organized Labor Abet Lawlessness? 



ALMOST the only friends that Police 
, Judges Sullivan and Oppenheim seem 
to possess these days, when the Re- 
call threatens, are the San Francisco labor 
politicians. "Why is it that organized labor 
so often seems to prefer affiliation on the side 
of bad government, or outright lawlessness?" 
ask many citizens, who commit the error of 
considering the labor leaders representative 
of their members. A moment's reflection 
would show that the interests of union mem- 
bers and union leaders are often far from 
identical. 

Labor organizations, like all clubs and 
societies, are run by a few active members. 
The majority of the others take compara- 
tively little interest in the affairs of the 
society, and if political benefits are to be 
gained by belonging to it, an inner circle 
soon obtains absolute control of the organi- 
zation. 

Only in Theory 

Theoretically, the leaders of trade unions 
should be the skillful and worthy mechanics 
who are notably good citizens as well as 
superior workers, but the reverse usually 
proves true. The worst mechanics — the men 
of least desirable character as leaders — are 
often those who obtain prominence in the 
organization. Such men being aware of 
their deficiencies as artisans substitute politi- 
cal activity for skill which is only obtained 
by laborious attention to their proper trades. 

The first step of an ambitious labor politi- 
cian is generally to warm himself into the 
position of "business representative." He 
thus separates himself from his work-bench, 
and never more, if he can help it, does a 
stroke of honest labor. The more trouble he 
can create for employers and his own craft 
in fomenting strikes and quarrels over shop 
technicalities the greater becomes his no- 
toriety and political strength. He generally 
finds congenial association in the inner circle 
which runs his union, for the proverb that 
birds of a feather flock together is as true as 
it is venerable. 

No Time for Politics 

In the nature of things, an honest hard- 
working mechanic has little time or taste 
for union politics. He is generally satisfied 
with the payment of his dues and his day's 
work finished he hurries to his humble home. 
To be left in peace to earn his wages and 
support his family is the hope of the artisan 
who is master of his trade, and a strike is 
what he least desires, for the loss in time and 
perhaps the breaking up of his little home 
cannot be compensated for by any slight in- 
crease in pay. As a rule, first-class me- 
chanics in the United States receive wages 



False Impression Created 
By Selfish Leaders 

By Harvey Brougham 

higher than the union scale. Intelligent em- 
ployers are always eager to obtain the best 
labor, and there is so much of the mediocre 
kind that the superior workman usually finds 
his skill at a premium. 

The superior mechanic is not, however, 
the individual for whom the American labor 
union is primarily designed. In all prob- 
ability he is disposed to produce more work 
than his union permits. He rarely attends 
union meetings unless specially urged for 
the settlement of some dispute with capital, 
and in the event of a strike is more likely 
to remain with his employers than the in- 
efficient workmen who can only maintain 
their wage scale by organization. 

A False Principle 

The false principle of labor unionism, as 
we see it exemplified in San Francisco, is 
that it places no value on the skill of work- 
men but battles for short hours and reduced 
output, and uses intolerable tyranny and 
violence to enforce its demands. Unionism 
has, therefore, within it the seeds of its certain 
destruction, for it can be maintained only 
by robbing American citizens of their consti- 
tutional liberty and corrupting the courts of 
justice by consolidating for the protection of 
outlaws who maim or murder non-union 
workers. That cannot be continued perma- 
nently. 

Strong Arm Methods 

In the past fifteen years we have seen 
organized labor in various form marshaled 
to rescue from the gallows several of the 
most desperate men that have ever appeared 
in American labor politics. The sums of 
money that have been extracted from the 
members of the American Federation of 
Labor to defend those desperadoes have been 
astounding. Not every member of the organ- 
ization approved of such friendly interest in 
the lawbreakers, but all had to contribute to 
the murder defense fund. The cardinal rule 
of unionism is one for all and all for one. 
Undoubtedly this defiant principle is working 
a great change of sentiment amongst the 
better classes of American citizens. They 
have been willing to overlook many offenses 
against the public believing that labor organi- 
zation is at bottom benevolent in its pur- 
poses, and that the humble toiler requires 
help in the continuous struggle of existence. 
It cannot be denied that there are many 
employers who would gladly grind the faces 



of the poor if they had their way. But being 
inherently defective in its ethics unionism 
has reached the limit of public toleration. 

Un-Americanism the Keynote 
The American people have realized that 
the surest method of attaining prominence in 
labor organization is to be un-American. If 
non-union toilers dare to accept work boy- 
cotted by the labor politicians, beat the mis- 
creants into unrecognizable fragments. If 
union thugs should by any mischance be 
arrested by the police have them liberated at 
once on straw bail by the police court petty- 
foggers, and proper apologies forwarded to 
all union headquarters to be duly engrossed 
and hung upon the walls. This subserviency 
of the courts to labor politics has had a 
powerful influence in bringing about the 
present undesirable condition in San Fran- 
cisco, where gangsters have so defied the 
laws with apparent immunity. 



AUSTRALIAN UNREST 

The domination of union labor in Aus- 
tralia — particularly Sydney — is not speeding 
up the millennium in the southern hemi- 
sphere. The London Times learns from its 
own correspondent that the steam-roller tac- 
tics of the City Council of Sydney, controlled 
by the Parliamentary Labor Party, has 
brought the city to the verge of revolution. 
An opposition alderman, "of prominence in 
the commercial affairs of Sydney," has as- 
serted that the labor oligarchy has involved 
the city so seriously that if its affairs were 
audited on a business basis the city would 
be handed over to a receiver. 

It is estimated that there are 12,000 to 
1 5,000 unemployed in the Sydney metropoli- 
tan area. In Melbourne there are 4000. 
The New South Wales government is issuing 
thousands of free food tickets daily. 



The 
Pail&e 



FOR 






Management of 
Halsey E. Manwaring 




January I, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Yellow Journalism Fears The Outlook 



IF WE ARE TO accept the predictions of 
Lord Northcliffe on the future of jour- 
nalism, it is full of difficulties. Than 
Lord Northcliffe, there is no publisher in the 
world more experienced or enterprising. 

Some years ago when this famous English 
newspaperman was visiting America, a New 
York reporter asked him what he thought of 
New York journals. "I think you are en- 
gaged in the business of selling twenty-dollar 
pieces for fifteen dollars," replied the visitor. 

Since that conversation took place in New 
York the expenses of English and American 
newspapers have increased enormously. The 
cost of paper alone has become almost pro- 
hibitive. Publishers of bulky newspapers 
now are lucky if they can sell twenty dollar 
pieces for half the money. They have to 
recoup their losses on print paper by their 
profits on advertising, and thereby they find 
themselves confronted with the problems that 
Northcliffe mentions in the London Times, 
of which he is proprietor: 

"Every expense must rise beyond calcu- 
lation, except the cost of the newspaper to 
its reader," he says. "But if the paper and 
ink of one copy cost more than the reader 
will pay, the loss on a newspaper must in- 
crease with its circulation. Are journalists, 
then, who have struggled for centuries to 
liberate themselves and their readers from 
the arbitrary control of Kings and Cabinets, 
to find themselves captive to the despotism of 
merchants and financiers? Can a newspaper 
remain in any sense free when it is no longer 
at liberty to reject the advertisements of the 
highest bidder? Only by establishing itself 
in the unshakable confidence of its readers, 
by maintaining and proclaiming a circulation 
that will make it so attractive to the mass of 
advertisers as to be independent of any party 
or interest among them, can it continue to 
afford that circulation or to deserve that con- 
fidence. But. while every channel of devel- 
opment must be kept open, each must be 
provided with sluice-gates against extrava- 
gance. 

"The foreign correspondent, for instance, 
who formerly was at leisure to travel with 
the focus of interest in foreign affairs, has 
now so to reduplicate himself as to be simul- 
taneously in each of the capitals of all the 
constantly increasing states of Europe. The 
cost of telegraphy rises as its speed dimin- 
ishes, and, when events of importance occur, 
the cables are at once congested with com- 
peting messages. What are the remedies? 
One is for papers to rely more and more 
upon the news furnished by agencies, from 
which, with the element of competition, 
accuracy and initiative are apt also to 
vanish. The alternative is to forsake the 



England's Most Famous 

Journalist Sees Breakers 

Ahead 

By Amory L. Bishop 

cable service for the letter post, which leads 
us again towards the newsletters and corantos 
of our first beginnings. But now an aurora 
shows on the dark horizon ; the wireless tele- 
phone, linking editors with their correspond- 
ents over a radius of many hundred miles, 
offers possibilities of which, even five years 
ago, we had not dreamed. The aeroplane, 
carrying parcels hot from the presses far in 
advance of the swiftest trains and steamers, 
hints at increases of circulation that can 
scarcely be estimated. In a decade or so 
from now, a newspaper edited at Johannes- 
burg, in wireless communication with London 
and other capitals of Europe, may be read 
within a few hours in every town in South 
Africa. The machines and presses now con- 
gregated in one building in London may be 
set in motion simultaneously in all parts of 
the Empire." 

Most of this statement of his lordship is 
verbal camouflage. The bald facts are that 
the greatest difficulty in running yellow news- 
papers is to blind the public to the fact that 
they are really nothing but advertising sheets. 
Their lofty pretensions of being champions 
of the people's liberties and enemies of pre- 
datory trusts, etc., etc.. etc., are all cheap 
bluff. The object of their existence is to be 
sensational and attract the multitude so that 
shrewd merchants will put advertisements in 
them. But the game begins to grow haz- 
ardous when the cost of printing the yellow 
sheet eats up most of the receipts from 
advertising. 



When the yellow magazines of America 
were at the white heat of their popularity 
and crowding the yellowest newspapers, 
there was a loss on every subscription. When 
multiplied by a few hundred thousand the 
losses became a very serious item. The .pub- 
lishers could stand the losses on subscrip- 
tion, however, if they continued to receive 
large advertising patronage, but if not, ruin 
confronted them. That has happened to 
many of them. 

The yellow newspapers, in which field of 
noble endeavor Lord Northcliffe is a veritable 
Napolean, have had some very fat years of 
advertising patronage, but they have edu- 
cated the public to expect such a mass of 
twaddle with the mass of advertising, that if 
the advertisers curtail their expenditures 
some of the newspaper Napoleons may find 
themselves heading close to St. Helena. The 
thinking public and the unthinking will have 
little use for them, and we may see a new 
era of journalism when readers will pay more 
for their newspapers and advertisers less. In 
that possible revolution, the governments 
may take a hand and insist on restricting the 
"liberties" of the yellow press. 

Lord Northcliffe does not overstate the 
case when he shouts, "breakers ahead!" to 
his British contemporaries; he realizes that 
fooling all the public all the time is a pre- 
carious task. 



"wlm your aunt visits us she will bring more 
sunshine into your life." 

"I don't want more sunshine," protested the little 
girl who is beginning to study the looking glass. 
"I've got freckles enough now." — Washington Star. 



Our Holiday stock of Picture Frames is 
now complete. 

F. B. COURVOISIER. 
Near Grant Ave. 315 Sutter St. 



win t -.•'" '.-. 




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LADIES — I desire to announce that I have secured the 
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in the Sate of California. 

OSTEOPATHY 

-nen'j and Children's Diseases. 


DR. GEC 

REGU \R1 
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et JZTIX25Z7L. San Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January I, 1921 



The Noble Art of Graft 



OUR FRONT PAGE CARTOON this 
week illustrates one of the unpleasant 
effects of "Union Graft." The over- 
swollen Gargantua, of voracious appetite, 
who squats on the map of San Francisco, is 
crowding out everybody and everything. 
There is no oom for new buildings or any- 
thing. It looks like "good night!" to our 
poor old town. 

"Union Graft" does not necessarily mean 
merely trade union "graft." The union in- 
cludes all the grafters — the profiteers — the 
combinations of organized pirates who are 
stripping honest citizens of almost their very 
clothes they wear. The amazing thing is 
that unlucky taxpayers are not charged for 
the air they breathe. 

In New York, big as it is, the "Union 
Graft" of mechanics, material profiteers, and 
blackmailing business agents threatening 
strikes, has practically stopped all building. 
The condition is no better here. Worse if 
anything. The growth of our fine seaport is 
stopped while the over-gorged monster of 
"Union Graft" spreads himself over the 
landscape. 

The first thing we know there will be uni- 
versity extension courses on the noble art of 
graft, which Webster defines to be the acqui- 
sition of "a soft thing", "an easy thing", "a 
snap." 



Isn't it about time the suffering public 
began to read about somebody besides 
roughneck "gangsters" going to jail for fifty 
years ? 



M. H. de YOUNG'S GREAT PUBLIC GIFT 

Next Sunday the people of San Francisco 
will be given their first opportunity to realize 
what a splendid thing has been done in their 
interest by M. H. de Young, who will donate 
to our community the Golden Gate Park 
Museum, begun by him a quarter of a cen- 
tury ago, and carried to its present admir- 
able development. 

But for Mr. de Young's public spirit and 
foresight, San Francisco would not have a 
museum today and the collected treasures 
of art and history that will remain a delight 
and pride to our city, would have been 
scattered or lost. 

San Francisco has good reason to think 
well of the publisher of the Chronicle, whose 
efforts have always been directed towards 
making his city a better place in which to 
live. 



of the distress in Europe, he is living with his 
aged parents and his wife and three children 
in a single, unheated attic room. Yet he 
goes on with his work, and, for all we know, 
may be producing masterpieces. 

The trouble is that M. Fort cannot at 
present get his volumes published; the cost 
of paper is too high. As a last resort he 
; pplied for government relief ; but France 
has now no money for the arts. 

The $6 a day for street work which San 
Francisco pays to its sweepers would not 
look bad to some of those Paris men of 
letters, if the distressing reports in the French 
journals be authentic. 



French Genius in Need 

One of the greatest of French men of 
letters, M. Paul Fort, writes to the Paris 
newspapers to say he is starving. A victim 



bay and Nighl Service 



Tires and Accessories 



Stockton and Sutter 

- GARAGE- 

DOLSON 6 ANDERSON. Inc. 
410 STOCKTON STREET 

PHONE DOUGLAS 5388 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



i:l.l'B O A R A a E 

TjT BO) I II "I |\ I STKF.ET 

PhoneAbrii - 

LOB A.KGELES, CAL. 



DENMAN OARAGE 
900-902 BUBB WW i t 
Phone Prospect Bfifl 

SAN 1KANC18CO 



DELINQUENT SALE 

QUEEN REGENT MERGER MINES 

COMPANY 

Location of principal place of business, San 

Francisco, California. Location of works. Mineral 
County, Nevada. 

NOTICE: There are delinquent upon the fol- 
lowing described stock on account of assessment 
levied on the fourth day of November, 1920. lh<* 

several amounts set opposite the names of the 
lespeclive shareholders as follows: 

Name No. No. 

Cerl. Shares Ami. 

Agar, C. J : 879 1200 $ 6.00 

Argall. W. J 331 1000 5.00 

Bergman. F. G. A. H 18 4000 20.00 

Bergman. F. G A. H 801 1000 5.00 

Bergman. F. G. A. H 994 1000 5.00 

Bierbach. Otto 595 1000 5.00 

Bierbach, Otto 832 100 .50 

Bierbach. Otto 920 3900 19.50 

Blood. Josephine P 1151 2000 10.00 

Cook. R. G 986 300 1.50 

Clark, A. F 442 2500 12.50 

Clark. A. F 993 1000 5.00 

Coll. Win. D 512 2500 12.50 

Loh. Wm. D _ 654 1500 7.50 

Colt, Wm. D 655 5300 26.50 

Coll, Wm. D 947 700 3.50 

Coon, E. C 1170 1000 5.00 

Dull. L. P. P 560 1000 5.00 

Doell, Edward 755 400 2.00 

Doell, Edward 831 400 2.00 

Doell, Edward 976 700 3.50 

Fitzgerald. J. T 695 5000 25.00 

Cireenhow, Alex 32 9200 46.00 

Greenhow, Alex 263 500 2.50 

Greenhow. Alex 405 300 1.50 

Greenhow, Alex 1080 200 1.00 

Greenwald, F' 626 126 .63 



Green, Wm 


765 


150 


.75 




771 


120 
230 


.60 


Green, Wm 


877 


1.15 


Green, Wm 


904 


225 


1.13 


Green, Wm 


922 


200 


1.00 


Green. Wm 


944 


100 


.50 


Grosjean 


Wm. G 


954 


1000 


5.00 


Grosseck 


Wm. A 


1173 


5000 


25.00 


Grosseck 


Wm. A 


1174 


5000 


25.00 


Grosseck 


Wm. A 


1175 


3000 


15.00 


Grosseck 


Wm. A 


1176 


2000 


10.00 


Grosseck 


Wm. A 


_ 1185 


5000 


25.00 


Herbert, 


Conrad 


115 


500 


2.50 


Herberl, 


Conrad 


274 


1000 


5.00 


Herbert, 




537 


500 


2.50 


Herbert, 


Conrad 


587 


2000 


10.00 


Herbert, 


Conrad 


738 


250 


1.25 


Herbert, 


Conrad 


970 


1000 


5.00 


Houston, 


E. A 


608 


3250 


16.25 


Houston, 


E. A 


911 


1750 


8.75 


Houston, 


E. A 


935 


1000 


5.00 


Houston, 


E. A 


1087 


1000 


5.00 


Houston, 


E. A 


1108 


400 


2.00 


Houston, 


E. A 


1129 


2200 


11.00 


Houston, 


E. A 


1134 


400 


2.00 


Hall. Mary E. ... 


929 


340 


1.70 


Hallowell, W. A 


1063 


250 


1.25 


Hallowell, W. A. .. 


1141 


750 


3.75 


Johnson, 


R. E 


872 


200 


1.00 


Kelley. 


•Cale 


960 


1000 


5.00 


Lowe, J 


R 


804 


2000 


10.00 


Lowe, J 


R _ 


886 


300 


1.50 


Lowe, J. 


R 


...V-. 95* 


200 


1.00 




887 


102 


.51 


Lodmell, 


A. M 


1194 


140 


.70 


Masters, 


W. A 


43 


400 


2.00 


Masters, 


W. A 


314 


200 


1.00 


Moran. Thos. P. ... 


843 


580 


2.90 


Norton, 


A K 


585 


Bal. 


7.25 


Norton, 


\. K 


637 


4960 


24.80 




730 


100 


.50 



Naf. Herman 909 50 .25 

Prather. W. E 696 1050 5.25 

Pralher, W. E 971 200 1.00 

Pralher. W. E 1047 1200 6.00 

Prather. W. E 1077 100 .50 

Poole. Edward 1096 100 .50 

Poole, Edward 1136 1000 5.00 

Prewitt, J. W 1195 21000 105.00 

Slocum. M. L 454 2000 1.00 

Slocum, M. L. _ 508 100 .50 

Slocum, M. L 598 700 3.50 

Slocum, M. L 604 150 .75 

Slocum, M. L 724 200 1.00 

Sharp, T. M 540 50 25 

Sharp. T. M 586 200 1.00 

Sharp, T. M 806 3300 16.50 

Sharp, T. M 1139 300 1.50 

Sharp, Mary 1157 100 .50 

Vincent, Ella J 624 600 3.00 

Vincent, Ella J 985 100 .50 

Vincent, Ella J 1120 200 1.00 

Weerls. R _ 555 1000 5.00 

Weerls, R 852 1000 5.00 

Weerls. R 941 1000 5.00 

Weerls. R 942 1000 5.00 

Whillaker, H. W 1188 25000 125.00 

And in accordance with law and order of Board 
of Directors made on the fourth day of November, 
1920, so many shares of each parcel of such stock 
as may be necessary will be sold at public auction 
at the office of the Company, 237 Monadnock 
Building. San Francisco, California, on Monday, 
the third day of January, 1921, at the hour of 
12:00 o'clock noon of said day, to pay the delin- 
quent assessment thereon, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

H. B. WADE. 

Secretary. 

237 Monadnock Building, 681 Market Street, 
San Francisco, Calif. 



January I. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Appoint The Judges 



IT IS TO BE HOPED that the spasm of 
outraged virtue which caused several 
gangsters to be lynched at Santa Rosa, 
and doomed the pugilist known as "Spud" 
Murphy, to fifty years imprisonment, has in- 
creased the public respect for Justice. Ser- 
iously I doubt that the lesson to the lawless 
will be salutary or lasting. Our judicial 
system is all wrong. It has so many defects 
that one finds it hard to begin the enumera- 
tion. 

The election of judges cannot fail to de- 
grade the judicial ermine, yet in deference 
to the principles of democracy, we insist 
that our State judges shall be elected in the 
same fashion as an ordinary councilman. 
Democracy delights in making its candidates 
for public office eat out of its hands — at 
least before they begin to receive the 
salaries. 

One cannot imagine a more humiliating 
job for an honest and independent judge, 
than to seek re-election after spending sev- 
eral years on the bench and performing his 
duty in exemplary fashion. An honest judge 
is sure to displease somebody when he has 
held the scales of justice clear for several 
years. Every enemy of an upright official 



awakes bright and early on election day to 
work against the public servant who has 
thwarted his schemes. 

People not versed in practical politics may 
imagine that there is no need for an honest 
and wise judge to mingle in the mob and 
solicit help to win a renomination. No 
cautious politician would take such a risk. 
The public has a short memory for deeds of 
honest worth done in public office, and new 
candidates arise every season, like mush- 
rooms. Many voters are rather pleased by 
a change of faces and names on their elec- 
tion tickets, though it must be admitted that 
in recent years, there has been a tendency 
amongst conservative voters to re-elect in- 
cumbent judges. The numbers of voters 
who are neither conservative nor discrimin- 
ating, however, make it imperative on all 
judicial candidates to take no chances of 
defeat by superconfidence in good records or 
popularity. 

Before election, a candidate for judge 
must see as many influential people as pos- 
sible and solicit their votes and those of 
their friends. When the saloon was part of 
the social system of the commonwealth, it 
was a point of political etiquette for judicial 



candidates as well as all other aspirants to 
public office, to show themselves at the pop- 
ular bars. The reputation of being a "good 
fellow" counted a good deal more than being 
a good lawyer, and in fact a young barrister 
without clients or experience, but glib of 
tongue and breezy of manner, might win 
the popular favor and defeat a venerable 
and learned judge. 

Least of all the judges of police courts 
should be elected, as the political system of 
selecting judges inevitably makes them un- 
favorable to good government. The crim- 
inal vote of a seaport like San Francisco is 
always aroused in an election for police 
judges. 

At present, ambitious young law students 
with a taste for politics start on a career as 
heads of police courts. Next they aspire to 
become Superior judges. The two police 
judges, Sullivan and Oppenheim, whom we 
now are so preparing to recall, would have 
been elected to the Superior bench at No- 
vember election, if the gangster affair and 
the bail-bond expose had not wrecked their 
plans. 

If we desire good government let us begin 
by stopping the election of judges and ap- 
point them to permanent places like our 
heads of Federal courts. 



Peck — Bui. my dear. I thought we hod planned 
to no lo the theatre this evening? 

Mrs. Peck — Yes, I know; but I have changed our 
mind. — Boston Transcript. 



The Rector System of Gas Heating 

fills a long felt want for a convenient means of heating homes and one that is. at the 
same time, economical in operation. 

It starts and stops at the touch of a button in the same manner as the electric light., 
are turned on and off. Could anything be easier than that) GAS is the fuel used and 
heat is generated at the radiator. Thus, there is no heat lost through transmission from 
a distant central heating plant. All burned gases are drawn through vent pipes by 
mechanical draught and discharged to outside air. Therefore, there is absolutely no 
odor in the room. 

The economy of the system is a result of its unequaled efficiency and the ease with 
which the fuel consumption may be controlled. No big outlay of money in advance 
is required to insure your winter supply of fuel. 

You owe it to yourself to investigate the RECTOR SYSTEM before deciding on a 
heating plant for your home or place of business. We will gladly furnish an estimate 
and descriptive literature free upon request. 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 

San Francisco District 445 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Calif. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 1, 1921 



Is Universal Suffrage A Fad ? 

Only One Woman In Three Casts A Ballot 

By Lucretia Osborne 



WOMAN SUFFRAGE, as judged, by 
the figures of the Presidential elec- 
tion, has been somewhat of a disap- 
pointment to the sex. The recent election 
for President was the first test of universal 
suffrage in the United States. It is said that 
only one worran in three went to the polls 
and voted. The National Woman Suffrage 
Association olaims that the proportion of 
women voters was three to every five men. 
The proper classification of the totals is not 
yet finished but the results are apparently 
not quite satisfactory to the women who 
have insisted on phenomenal results from 
universal suffrage. 

In Colorado, which was one of the first 
states to grant woman suffrage, the experi- 
ment has never been regarded as of great 
political significance. European critics have 
always maintained that woman suffrage in 
Colorado has been a failure. 

San Francisco Results 

In San Francisco the women's vote has 
accomplished nothing decisive, nor has it 
brought into public life many of the sex, 
except the class which always took an 
interest in politics. The addition of the 
woman's vote has, however, added a good 
deal to the cost of election and that is not 
desirable, as every year our taxes mount 
still higher. We might bear that misfortune 
with greater resignation, if it could be shown 
that the female influence on politics has been 
signally beneficial. The proofs are not at 
hand. 

Tardy Voters 

For years in San Francisco the percentage 
of voters who register but fail to cast their 
ballots has been increasing. This is very 
significant, as our election commissioners, 
and Registrar Zemansky have resorted to 
various expedients to bring out a larger total. 
The cost of those expedients has not bothered 
the commissioners in the least. That is char- 
acteristic of San Francisco. 

Combing the Byways 

Deputy registrars have, for several years, 
gone into all the byways of San Francisco, 
to exhort voters to place their names on the 
election roll. That proceeding has, of course, 
added to the female vote, as women are more 
likely than men to be found at home during 
the working hours. But invariably the elec- 
tion returns are disappointing in spite of the 
stimulated registrations. The registered 
voters lose their enthusiasm, and many of 
them do not cast their ballots, even though 
the polling booths be but a few steps away. 



Politics an Acquired Taste 

The fact is that woman is not partial to 
politics except it may be in matters that 
relate to schools or some probate law of 
inheritance like the "common property law," 
which was defeated in California last No- 
vember. That law aroused more interest 
than usual amongst California women but 
the men massed against it, and defeated it in 
decisive fashion. 

Interest Is Waning 

In former Presidential elections in San 
Francisco, when the party system was 
stronger, it rarely occurred that the vote 
polled was less than 80 per cent of the reg- 
istered vote. In some elections like that of 
Cleveland and Harrison, the percentage 
reached 96, and there was then no woman 
suffrage. 

Is woman suffrage destined to prove that 
it is, after all, but a fad? 

Only a Mild Adventure 

To many women an election is only a mild 
adventure, and to the young women, who 
have not settled down in life, it is not even 
that. 

I know that many of my earnest sisters 
of the League of Women Voters, which has 
branches in forty-six out of forty-eight 
States, have ambitions and hopeful plans of 
educating our sex up to a high standard of 
civic interest and familiarity with elections. 
I shall believe in this Utopian project when 
I see it in something more than a nebulous 
condition, when — at least two out of twenty 
of my women friends, take as much interest 
in a citizenship course at the club as a 
fashion show at the movies. 



THE PASSING OF SAMUEL GOMPERS 

THE AMERICAN FEDERATION OF 
LABOR claims to be numerically a 
very strong organization, though the 
actual figures of the organization have never 
been correctly totaled. Politically the Fed- 
eration has not come up to the expectation 
of its leaders, for it is one thing to marshal 
the members in figures on a slip of paper, 
but quite another to deliver their votes at 
the polls. 

In the late election for President of the 
United States, the Democratic party was to 
receive all the political benefits of the Fed- 
eration of Labor, for the ostensible head had 
decreed the important block of votes to 
Woodrow Wilson's friends and followers. 
Under President Wilson organized labor had 



enjoyed the greatest swing in its history. 
The Secretary of Labor whom Mr. Wilson 
named to his cabinet was the personification 
of union fidelity. On the Republican ticket 
last November, was a candidate for Vice- 
President whose nomination was construed 
by organized labor as a defiant challenge 
to it. Yet in the history of the elections for 
President in the United States, never did the 
Democracy receive such a decisive beating. 
What become of all the millions of votes 
that Sam Gompers pledged to the Democratic 
ticket? The American public has not yet 
fully comprehended the extent of the politi- 
cal disaster which befell Gompers last No- 
vember. 



"If you will permit me lo say so, you have just 
I'.nd a beautiful caller." 

"Yes. a book agent." replied the business man, 
with faraway look in his eyes. 

"What was she selling?" 

"I couldn't tell you to save my life. All I know 
is that she smiled and I bought." — Birmingham Age- 
Herald. 



A woman wearing an anxious expression called 
at an insurance office one morning. 

"I understand," she said, "that for five dollars 
I can insure my house for a thousand dollars." 

"Yes." replied the agent, "that is right." 

"And," continued the woman anxiously, "do you 
inquire as to the origin of the fire?" 

"Certainly," was the prompt reply. 

"Oh!" and she turned to leave the office, "I 
thought there was a catch in it somewhere." — Anon. 



"I trust your worship will excuse me this time." 
said an habitual drunkard at the police court, "it is 
my misfortune. I am a child of genius." 

"And what is your age?" questioned the magis- 
trate. 

"Forty-two years." 

"Then it is time you were weaned. You'll have 
to do fourteen days away from the bottle." — Pear- 
son's Weekly. 



HOMES PHOTOGRAPHED 

OLD PORTRAITS 

COPIED 
KODAK FINISHING 

GABRIEL MOULIN 



153 KEARNY ST. 



Douglas 4969 



Established 25 Years. 



Kearny 2842 



Hair Priced Lower 

Hair Nets,doz. - - $1.00 
Hair Switches - $5.95 

Values up to $15.00 

TRANSFORMATIONS 

First Quality 

Now $9.95 

You can't afford to have your hair look 
badly. Prices like these appeal to all ladies. 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco. 



January I, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



Britain Has An Army of Unionists 



AS LABOR POLITICS in the United 
States has always been largely pat- 
terned after English labor politics, it 
is interesting to learn that organized labor in 
England has almost shot its bolt, as far as 
a general revolt is concerned. Careful 
students of English politics now believe that 
there will be no general proletarian attempt 
at revolution in England within the present 
generation. There will not be within ten 
years a Labor Government in Great Britain, 
it is thought. 

The outstanding feature of the present 
industrial ferment in England is that it has 
not been possible to cement the great body of 
organized workers into one vast strike which 
would paralyze all the necessary industries 
and bring capitalism on its knees. 

Agitators Alert 

Communists, Bolshevists and the entirely 
selfish preachers of syndicalism have sought 
to turn discontent into channels which might 
further their own extreme plans, but they 
have met with a very small measure of 
success. 

The fact which continually defeats the 
agitation of extremists is that trade unionism 
is powerfully influenced by the innate con- 
servatism of the British race. The member- 
ship and power of the trade unions have in- 
creased enormously in recent years, but the 
movement which has brought trade union 
organization to its present state of strength 
and efficiency has been comparatively slow in 
growth. Even in the eighteenth century the 
Journals of the House of Commons abounded 
in petitions and counter-petitions revealing 
the existence of journeymen's associations in 
most of the skilled trades. 

Decrease of Membership Likely 

Instead of there being an increase of the 
membership of British trade unions, there is 
likely to be a marked decrease in the next 
few years. It is possible to obtain a fairly 
correct estimate of the numerical strength of 
organized labor in Great Britain. 

According to the monthly review published 
by the British Parliamentary Committee of 
the Trades Union Congress the unions affili- 
ated with the congress had in August last a 
total membership of 6.790,662 and accumu- 
lated funds aggregating over $40,000,000. 
These figures suggest that organized labor at 
the present moment constitutes, with the de- 
pendents of its members, at least one-third 
of the total population of the United 
Kingdom. 

The Miners' Federation of Great Britain 
alone has a membership of 900.000. the 
National Union of Railway Men has 481.000 



But the Expected Dictator 
Does Not Materialize 

By Adolph S. Logan 

on its roll. The Weavers' Amalgamation has 
a membership of 220,000. Almost every 
occupation in Great Britain is unionized. In 
all there are two hundred unions affiliated 
with the Trade Union Congress. 

Opportunity for a Dictator 

Such a force obedient to a single com- 
mand might be sufficient to paralyze the com- 
munity by united action and offers a mighty 
instrument to tempt the ambitions of a dic- 
tator. The dictator has not arisen, and there 
are no signs that trade unionists as a body 
desire his appearance or would be prepared 
to follow his leading if he could be found. 
The nearest approach to a scheme of united 
action which has yet come to an experi- 
mental stage is the creation of the Triple 
Alliance of miners, railway men and trans- 
port workers, and the partners in this com- 
bination have shown no eagerness to use 
their full power to put pressure on the com- 
munity. Since the alliance was formed there 
has been a national strike of railway men. 
and the recent coal strike, and in neither 
case has there been sympathetic stoppage of 
work by the two partners not directly con- 
cerned in the dispute. 

The present tendency in England is to pro- 
vide against unemployment by reduction of 
output. The less production the more hands 
it will take to perform the necessary work 
of the nation. It would be hard to imagine 
any kind of reasoning more superficial. 
British firms are complaining every day of 
losing orders because of their inability to 
quote firm prices, which is an impossibility 
when the productive capacity of the work- 
men and the amounts of their wage demand- 
arc in doubt. If British firms cannot quote 
prices where will the woik come from? 

Further Wage Demands Impossible 

Already the workers in most lines have 
reached the stage where further demands for 
increased wages are imiwssiblc. The effort 
to overcome rising costs of living by constant 
increases of wages have not proved satis- 
factory. What will be the remedy? The 
syndicalist? and disturbers generally declare 
"revolution." but they are in the minority 
and their views are rejected by the conserva- 
tive labor leaders. 

What will be most likely to take place will 
be a gradual readjustment of wages and 
prices and a realization by the workers that 



they failed to appreciate the benefits they 
enjoyed in the days of boom .prices and work 
for everybody, and then some to spare. 



GREATEST TRUST IN AMERICA 

COMMENTING on the fact that the coal 
miners union organization in the 
United States collects every year a 
minimum of $11,000,000 in dues from its 
members, and that the Brotherhood of Rail- 
way Trainmen has a reserve fund of $12,- 
000,000 in its treasury, a Seattle newspaper 
remarks that the membership of the Repub- 
lican party is many times greater than the 
entire union membership of the country, yet 
it never has such available funds for in- 
fluencing public opinion. 

"If any combination of capital, had at its 
disposal for any purpose whatsoever the 
amount of money available, and raised every 
year by union labor, it would be attacked as 
a menace to the country," remarks our 
Seattle contemporary. 

"Its activities would be restricted by every 
law that resourceful legislators could devise. 
Yet union labor, the greatest trust in 
America, operates virtually without legal re- 
striction, and its purposes are frankly selfish, 
taking no consideration of the rights or wel- 
fare of any element of the Nation's popula- 
tion except itself. In fact, it is hardly too 
much to say that its hand is against all 
others." 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



PYR0-V0ID 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 
- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Stafatirm tuw.W r, Momrj HffmrnM 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 
Dental Specialist 

908 Market Street. >t Powell 

San Fnuicisco 

Depc N. L E«uM»ae« 1 903 

s i if rovm TEETH 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January I, 1921 




ocioi: 




Complaint of a Duchess 

NOW IT IS no less a person than Con- 
stance, Duchess of Manchester, who 
complains in print of the disappear- 
ance of good manners in genteel society. 
Her allegations begin with the objection to 
young girls defying all attempts at chaper- 
onage. She says: 

"Girls consider it perfectly proper to come 
home alone from dances with a male friend, 
and with friends probably unknown either 
to guardians or parents. All this leads to an 
appalling laxity perhaps not of conduct — 
since girls and men come safely through ex- 
periences which would have been calamitous 
to their Victorian prototype — but of man- 
ners. 

"So far as young men are concerned bad 
manners are not a new complaint. They 
were already bad before the war and we 
women used to be told by men who had 
learned their politeness in a finer school that 
we were to blame for the increasing rudeness 
of youths, because we put up with it with- 
out protest. No woman should have to pro- 
test, but some of us occasionally are moved 
to administer a rebuke when, for example, a 
young man remains sprawling in his chair 
without rising when a lady enters the room, 
and other things the which are probably 
done thoughtlessly, but which are uncour- 
teous and show either great laziness or a 
lack of chivalry. 

"Nowadays, when girls, too, exhibit sur- 
prisingly bad manners, we are becoming 
more tolerant of this modern phase which 
makes young people treat one another 
casually and with an entire lack of cere- 
mony. Older people receive little deference, 
hostesses little consideration." 

The Duchess blames the parents of the 
bad-mannered offspring, but that does not 
quite explain how the old folks got into such 
a state of parental incapacity if their own 
fathers and mothers were pinks of propriety. 



IN LOCAL CIRCLES 

— Mrs. M. E. Hecht gave a dinner at the 
Fairmont on Christmas night for the mem- 
bers of her family. In the party were Mr. 
and Mrs. Mark Gerstle, Miss Louise Gerstle, 
Mr. and Mrs. William Gerstle, Miss Miriam 
Gerstle and Mr. and Mrs. John Rothschild. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George Newhall gave a 
large dinner dance Saturday evening at their 
home in Burlingame. Their guests included 
Mr. and Mrs. John Drum, Mr. and Mrs. 



Templeton Crocker, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Martin, Mrs. Butler Breeden, Mr. and Mrs. 
Laurence Irving Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Loring 
Pickering, Mrs. Joseph B. Crockett, Colonel 
and Mrs. Sydney Cloman, Mr. and Mrs. 
Mountford Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Judge, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Eastland. Mrs. 
Eugene Murphy, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Knight, Mr. Russell Wilson, Mr. Frank Caro- 
lan and Mr. Gordon Armsby. 

— Miss Frances Lent gave a luncheon on 
Monday at the Woman's Athletic Club and 
entertained Miss Barbara Kimble, Miss Vere 
de Vere Adams, Mrs. Francis Langton, Mrs. 
Andrew Welch, Miss Margaret Buckbee, Miss 
Geraldine Grace, Miss Katherine Bentley, 
Mrs. Paul Fagan, Mrs. Elmer Jennings, Mrs. 
Kenneth Mcintosh, Miss Amanda McNear, 
Miss Elizabeth Schmiedell, Miss Helen Brack, 
Miss Katherine and Miss Barbara Sesnon 
and Mrs. Marshall Madison. 

— Mr. Felton Elkins, who has been visit- 
ing Mr. and Mrs. Edward Salisbury Field in 
the south for several weeks, returned north 
last week and is at his home in Monterey. 

— Mrs. William H. Crocker and Miss 
Helen Crocker returned from New York on 
Friday and joined Mr. Crocker at their 
home in Burlingame. The Crockers gave a 
large dinner Christmas night. 

— Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels arranged a sur- 
prise dinner party on Tuesday evening for 
her son, Mr. Howard Spreckels, to celebrate 
his birthday anniversary. About a dozen of 
Mr. Spreckels' friends surprised him by 
arriving unexpectedly for dinner. 

— The marriage of Miss Coralia Duenas 
and Mr. Gratton Phillips took place Tuesday 
morning at St. Mary's Cathedral. The cere- 
mony was performed at 1 I o'clock and later 
there was a wedding breakfast and recep- 
tion at the Duenas residence in Clay street. 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Francisco Duenas of this city and San Sal- 
vador. Mr. Duenas represents his country at 
Washington. During the past three years 
Mrs. Duenas and her daughter have spent 
much time in California, and Mr. Duenas 
makes frequent visits here. Mr. Phillips is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gratton D. Phillips 
of this city. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William F. Perkins had 
at their Chrwtmas dinner Mr. and Mrs. 
Alfred Oyster, Mrs. J. S. Oyster, Mrs. Alice 
Masten Spencer, Miss Elizabeth Oyster, Miss 
Helen Perkins, Miss Margaret Perkins, Miss 
Marianna Spencer, Messrs. Warren, Francis 



Stockeley Wilson, and William and Matsen 
Spencer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Eyre Pinckard will spend 
New Year's in Los Angeles with Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard H. Girvin, who have been 
living there for the past six months. 

— Mr. Templeton Crocker returned to 
Burlingrme from the south on Friday to 
spend the holidays with Mrs. Crocker. He 
is on a leave of absence from the navy and 
will soon sail with his ship for South 
America. 

— Following a charming old custom of 
many years, Mr. and Mrs. George McNear 
and their son, George McNear III, gave a 
large party at their home on Christmas 
night. 

— Miss Isabelle McCreery, the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Richard McCreery, enter- 
tained her little friends at a Christmas party 
Tuesday afternoon at the McCreery home in 
Burlingame. The afternoon's entertainment 
included a Punch and Judy show, among 
other delightful features planned for the 
young guests. 

— Commander and Mrs. William C. Van 
Antwerp (Edith Chesebrough) are occupy- 
ing the Charles Clark home at Pebble Beach, 
and Miss Helen Chesebrough will be their 
guest for New Year's celebration at Del 
Monte. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hill Vincent left 
Thursday for their home at Pebble Beach, 
and will have house guests over the week- 
end, among whom will be Dr. and Mrs. Max 
Rothschild. 



Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



Most Pleasant Time of the Year at 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

To Enjoy Sports and Social Pleasures 
CARL S. STANLEY V MANAGER 











Specialists — 

Is it not reasonable to sup- 
pose that the merchant who 
is concerned with nothing but 
women's apparel is better 
able to meet the needs of the 
public in his special line? 
Willard's are Specialists in 
Women's Apparel. 

Willard's 

Geary Street 

Between Grant and Stockton 











January I. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



— The supper dance to be given for the 
benefit of the Infant Shelter on New Year's 
Eve at the Palace hotel will be a brilliant 
affair. It will be a fancy dress dance and 
some stunning costumes are being planned. 
The leading shops have given any number of 
handsome articles, which will be awarded 
during the evening. There is an automobile 
lunch basket of black leather, several ostrich 
feathers fans, two beaded bags, rhinestone 
shoe buckles, a gold matchbox and a silver 
cigarette case and any number of other 
equally beautiful favors. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Willard Drown gave a 
luncheon on Christmas day at their home in 
Washington street. They have followed this 
custom for several years and usually enter- 
tain the same group of relatives and friends. 
Their guests this year were Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Preston, who came down from Med- 
ford to spend the holidays; Mr. and Mrs. 
Stuart Haldorn, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Pike, Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles G. Norris, Mr. and Mrs. 
Daulton Mann, Mrs. Edgar Preston, Mr. and 
Mrs. William Roth, Mrs. Mabel Cluff Miles, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Scott, Mr. and Mrs. 
King, Dr. Tracy Russell, Mr. Vail Bakewell 
and Dr. Guthrie. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George Wingfield and 
their children will leave for the East in 
January to spend the remainder of the win- 
ter. They will return to California in the 
early summer and will return to Burlingamc 
for the season. They occupied the Roberl 
L. Coleman house at Burlingame until a few 
week ago, when they came to town and took 
apartments at the Fairmont. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Hammond came 
from the north to pass the holidays with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Hammond, a: 
their home on Broadway and were at the 
Christmas dinner given by the Hammonds. 

— Mr. Gordon Tevis returned from the 
south to pass Christmas with his parents. 
Mr. and Mrs. William S. Tevis. He has been 
living in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara for 
the past year. 

—Mr. and Mrs. William H. McKittrick 
are entertaining a house party over the holi- 
days at their place at Bakersfield. Miss Lily 
O'Connor and Miss Minnie Houghton went 
down from here on Friday to be there for 
Christmas. 

— Mrs. William Miller Graham and her 
daughter, Miss Geraldine Graham, have re- 
turned to California from New ^ork and are 
with Mrs. Graham's parents. Mr. and Mrs. 
ITiomas Pollock, at their home in HolK- 
wood. Later the Grahams will go to their 
home in Santa Barbara. 

— Miss Eleanor Spreckels gave a dance 
Monday evening at the home of her parent.-. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels in Pacific 
avenue. Miss Spreckels is home for the 
Christmas vacation from Miss Spencc's 



School in New York and will return there 
on Friday. 

— Judge William C. Van Fleet and his 
daughter, Miss Julia Van Fleet, left Thurs- 
day for Coronado to spend a month. They 
went south in Mr. John D. Spreckels' yacht, 
Venetia. 

— Carl S. Stanley, manager of Hotel del 
Monte, has returned from a tour of Southern 
California. He made a study of hotel con- 
ditions and makes the prediction that the 
greatest number of people in the history of 
California will come from Eastern and Ca- 
nadian points to spend the winter here. The 
advance reservations and so few cancella- 
tions give Mr. Stanley the basis to make his 
prediction. 

— Among the notable social events in New 
York city in which San Francisco girls fig- 
ured prominently last week was the debut 
at the Ritz Carlton hotel of Miss Marguerite 
Doubleday, daughter of George Doubleday. 
Miss Doubleday will be remembered here as 
having participated in the social affairs of 
the debutante set last winter when she came 
here on a visit to her uncle and aunt. Dr. 
and Mrs. Herbert Moffitt. Friends in this city 
are predicting an unusually successful season 
for her in New York. 

The ball given by her father at the fash- 
ionable hotel as the coming-out party was 
attended mostly by the season's debutantes 
of New York. Preceding the ball Miss 
Doubleday entertained some of her friends 
at dinner at her home. 



The regular New Year's dinner of the 
hotel will be held in the Venetian Room 
December 31. 



At the Fairmont 

There will be a special New 'tear's dance 
and concert in the lobby at the Fairmont. 

The American Women's Overseas League 
will entertain sailors in Rainbow Lane from 
2 to 6 o'clock p. m. 

Mrs. Upham's recital will take place on 
December 30 in the Red Room. 

( alifornia Commandery dance will take 
place in the Red Room December 31. 

• • • ■•■• • • • • 



RESERVE AT CAFE MARQUARD 

There are a few reservations yet available 
at Cafe Marquard, Geary and Mason streets, 
"the smart place for smart people." The 
wise patrons will be those who make sure 
of them. 

The revue by Mr. Jack Hurley, intro- 
ducing "Beautiful Annabelle Lee," "Idle 
Dreams," etc., accompanied by the Para- 
mount Melodists, concertal and danse or- 
chestraists, under Bert E. Fiske, is a con- 
tinued triumph. So, too, is the appearance 
of Patricia Allen in "Toyland." 

The reservation dinner tariff for New 
Year's day is $3.50. Service and cuisine at 
Cafe Marquard leaving nothing to be de- 
sired. 











Our Entire 
Stock of 

Exclusive 
FURS 

at Reductions 
Ranging up to 
jQ per cent. 






LOUIS GASSNER, Inc. 

1 1 2 Geary Street 





• • • i-i.i.i — . . 



PRE INVENTORY 



NOW ON 



SALE 



NOW ON 



Men's Furnishing Goods 
at 20 to 50 per cent off 

HASTINGS CLOTHING COMPANY 

POST STREET AT KEAR.\Y 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January I, 1921 



^ttomohjh 




ttfF UNEMPLOYMENT should assume 
I widespread proportions the most logi- 
cal answer to the situation would be 
the prompt utilizing of this excess labor in 
the building of highways possessing an inter- 
state significance," comments David Jame- 
son, .president of the American Automobile 
Association. 

"It will be remembered that when Con- 
gress was approached some two years ago 
for $200,000,000 additional under the pro- 
visions of the Federal Aid Road Act," con- 
tinues Mr. Jameson, "it was set forth that 
this money, which called for an equal 
amount from the several States, would serve 
to carry on road building and absorb the 
surplus labor which it was anticipated would 
result from the abrupt conclusion of the big 
struggle. Besides this total of $400,000,000 
from the National treasury and the several 
States the sum of $9,000,000 was added to 
the $10,000,000 previously appropriated for 
the construction of roads in Federal forest 
reserves. 

"But the period of non-employment did 
not arrive, besides which there was difficulty 
in obtaining materials, and their shipment 
and the abnormal prices cut down very sub- 
stantially new road mileage. Present indi- 
cations, however, are that the supply of 
labor in the near future may considerably 
exceed the demand, and hence a recourse to 
important public improvements would be a 
direct means of stabilizing labor conditions. 
Surely there can be no greater benefit con- 
ferred upon the entire country than by the 
building of highways which will materially 
reduce the cost of transportation and facili- 
tate the exchange of farm and manufactured 
products between the country districts and 
the centers of population. 

"Congress could not act more wisely than 
to pass at this short session the Townsend 
bill calling for the creation of a Federal com- 
mission to lay out a great system of inter- 
state highways and arrange with the several 
States for the prosecution of this National 
undertaking at the very earliest moment. 
The building of roads is one thing which will 
unquestionably improve conditions, and we 
are all now well aware of the fact that 
public sentiment is overwhelmingly in favor 
of maximum activities in this regard, from 
Nation, State and county." 



The National Automobile Show 

Great interest is being taken all over the 
United States in the National Automobile 
Show which will open in New York on Sat- 
urday, January 8, and continue for a week. 
During four years of war in Europe there 
was some halt in the development of the 
motor car. Now that the industry is pro- 
ceeding once more under favorable condi- 
tions everybody is eager to see what progress 
is being made. Automobile manufacturers 
from all parts of the world are desirous of 
seeing the latest in American car designs and 
engines. 

There will be eighty-eight manufacturers 
of motor cars in this year's exposition at New 
York. The several hundred models to be dis- 
played will show many changes in body 
lines, and improvements will be noted in 
motors also. Many of these are the result 
of war experiments and they were not fully 
developed for last year's show. 

A summary of the manufacturing field, 
including some 2C0 makes of cars entered 
in this year's New York automobile exposi- 
tion shows that 37|/2 per cent use four- 
cylinder engines, 54 per cent the six-cylinder 
type, 6|/2 per cent the eight-cylinder design 
and 2 per cent the twelve-cylinder model. 
These statistics are based on the type of 
engine used, and not on the quantity of cais 
produced. When the six-cylinder engine was 
first adopted by several manufacturers, the 
four was the accepted standard, and much 
discussion in comparing the two types fol- 
lowed. Then came the eight and twelve- 
cylinder designs, and these aroused further 
arguments. There are variations in the en- 
gines, dual valves and "V" designs being 
prominent. The latest addition to the many 
types is an eight-in-a-row type, cast in one 
block. 

Great Advantage of Trucks 

One of the greatest factors which has 
helped to make the motor truck a necessity 
on the farm- is the increase in shortage of 
farm labor, and the consequent necessity for 



making every man produce more than be- 
fore. With the physical limitations of the 
farmer remaining constant, the only means 
he has had of producing more in a given 
period has been to use mechanical instead of 
manual labor. The motor truck has been 
one of the most important of these mechani- 
cal means to take in his crops — move them 
to rail sidings or to market, and to bring 
back to the farm all those articles which are 
not produced on the farm but which are 
necessary to the successful prosecution of 
farming as a business. According to the 
Secretary of Agriculture in his annual report 
to the President, farm labor is likely to be 
still more scarce in the future, because of the 
trend of population toward the cities. 

Motor trucks help the farmer to select new 
and better markets. The truck covers more 
ground than the horse-drawn wagon. From 
a report on 1000 trucks, filed with the De- 
partment of Agriculture it has been esti- 
mated that the trucks travel 3820 miles per 
year, and are. used on 173 days per year. 
The average lite of the trucks is between 
six and one-half and seven years; and in 
most cases, depreciation is the largest single 
item of expense in connection with their 
operation. Most of the owners of one-half 
and three-quarter-ton trucks prefer pneu- 
matic tires; the owners of one-ton trucks 
are about evenly divided in their preferences, 
and most of the owners of trucks larger 
than one-ton prefer solid tires. About four- 
fifths of the farmers state that their trucks 
decrease their expense for hired help. On 
the average they estimate that the decrease 
amounts to $324 per year. 

Weighing Truck Loads 

A determined effort to keep overloaded 
trucks from the roads of New Jersey is being 
made in that State. Up to a short time ago 
no attempt had been made anywhere in the 
country to compel motor trucks to observe 
the maximum load violations. With the in- 
crease of motor transportation and the con- 
sequent greater wear and tear on the roads, 
the attention of officials in a few places 
which have laws regulating truck loads was 
directed to the matter primarily as a means 
of road preservation. While it is admitted 
that the majority of the roads are by no 
means what they ought to be, they must be 
taken as they are until means are found to 
improve them properly, and it is an evidence 
of wisdom as well as justice toward all road 
users on the part of highway officials to keep 
the load weights within reasonable bounds. 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



January I, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



In New Jersey, which has tackled this 
problem of excessive motor truck loads more' 
thoroughly than any other eastern State, the 
plan was adopted early in the summer of 
weighing trucks which appeared suspiciously 
heavy. This was merely preliminary to a 
more determined effort. It is now announced 
that proper scales have been purchased and 
within the next month they will be placed at 
five selected sites along the thoroughfares. 

Spare Your Tires 

Much of the waste and destruction in the 
field of tires is brought about by overloading 
the tires, by making them carry too much 
weight, or by using tires too small for the 
weight carried, evils the results of which are 
very similar to underinflation. 

Many motorists are prone to carry too 
much weight in their cars and expect their 
tires to stand up under the strain. These car 
owners should use over-size tires which were 
primarily designed for exceptional and hard 
service. They have of late, however, come 
into general favor because their larger size 
gives them extra strength. Then, too, an 
oversize tire having a greater air space and 
an easier riding cushion makes the car more 
comfortable and in the long run is good for 
many more miles than is the regular size. In 
fact the more experienced car owners have 
come to specify over-size tires for original 
equipment. Also cord tires are all made 
one size over-size which seems to be pretty 
good evidence that they are more advantage- 
ous. It may be well here to explain that an 
over-size tire is one in which the diameter 
is given in odd figures, as, for example, 
35x4!/2, which is the over-size for 34x4. and 
is made to fit the rim made for the latter. 
There are no over-size rims. 

Use Brain in Driving 

The motor truck driver, says a transpor- 
tation engineer, who stops his truck loaded 
or unloaded on a hill, and fails to block the 
rear wheels before leaving his machine is 
sooner or later sure to have an accident. 
Such negligence may result in serious dam- 
age to life, the truck and to public property. 

The driver who doesn't think will often 
put his emergency brake on and go off. for- 
getting that some little boy may let his 
brakes off or that perhaps a hard wind may 
give the truck a start, sending it off with no 
driver at the wheel. The safest way to leave 
a truck on a hill, or on any incline steep 
enough to cause it to move, is to block both 
rear wheels securely. 

It is only necessary to think at the right 
time. Obtain two good blocks that may be 
carried on the truck all the time, to be used 
when needed. They may prevent a bad 
accident that would probably cost the driver 
his job and the owner considerable expense. 



What Skidding Does 

Skidding surprises the motorist, often- 
times, in its effect on his tires. Sometimes 
a tire will be noticed with the tread worn 
through to the fabric in one or more spots. 
The balance of the tire, in such a case, will 
be in good condition. Too sudden locking 
of the brakes, forcing the tire to drag, or 
taking corners at too high a speed, is ordin- 
arily responsible. 

Skidding the tire for a short distance is 
often little thought of at the time. But the 
fact is that this slide has caused a flat place 
on the tread of the tire, which pounds away 
on the road, revolution after revolution, like 
a flat car wheel on a locomotive. 

When the tread has already been weak- 
ened by the grinding action of skidding, this 
incessant pounding causes the tire to go out 
of service prematurely, according to Miller 
experts. 

A motorist will save dollars in tire ex- 
pense, if he will coast to a stop, employing 
his brakes very gradually. If he plans ahead, 
he may check the momentum on the car by 
closing the throttle with the clutch engaged. 
When starting from rest, an easy foot on the 
pedal will save miles of tire service. If a 
car starts off with a jump, the effect on the 
tires is much the same as though the tread 
were rasped away with a heavy file. 



Cleaning Leather Upholstery 

Never use gasoline or kerosene to clean 
leather upholstery, because such treatment 
will crack it. Water to which a little am- 
monia has been added is as good as any- 
thing for getting the dirt off, and a brisk 
rubbing with a soft cloth, is all that is 
needed to restore the shine after the dirt has 
been removed. If you wish, you can soften 
the leather and assist in preserving it by 
applying a good leather dressing. Nothing 
is better, however, than a mixture of turpen- 
tine and linseed oil for treating the leather. 
Mix these in the proportions of two parts of 
the linseed oil to one of turpentine. 

Examine the Fan Belt 

One common cause of engine overheating 
is the poor operating condition of the fan, 
due to the belt driving it being too loose and 
slipping on the pulleys, thus driving the fan 
at a much slower speed than is intended. 
Most engines have provision for adjusting 
the belt tension by setting the fan shaft 
slightly higher, which lengthens the distance 
between pulley centers and takes up the belt 
slack. Sometimes the belt is badly soaked 
with oil or coated with grease to such an 
extent that abnormal slipping cannot be pre- 

(Continued on Page 18) 



POLICYHOLDERS SURPLUS $4,312,904.00 

EARTHQUAKE - FIRE - AUTOMOBILE 

YOU LIVE IN UNITED STATES 
INSURE IN UNITED STATES 

United States Fire Insurance Co. 

INCORPORATED 1824 

Pacific Department Harold Junker 

Manager 



266 Bush St., S. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Auto Fender and Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining To Automobiles 

OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING— BLACKSMITHING 



1140 GEARY STREET 



Phone Franklin 3685 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Co, in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 

TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



F. RATES 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January I, 1921 



In The World of Commerce 



IT IS A STRANGE FACT thai there is not 
nearly as much investment buying of se- 
curities now as there should be. This is 
the time for those who wish to buy good 
stocks to lay in a provision of dividend pro- 
ducers. It does not take a seer to tell you 
the stock market quotations are at their very 
lowest, and that, even should certain issues 
drop lower, the great majority of well estab- 
lished stocks are bound to rise in value 
shortly. It is doubtful if some of the stocks 
which may now be had at bargain counter 
prices will ever again fall to so low a level. 

There is a very general complaint that the 
public is on a "buyers' strike." The buyers' 
strike, so-called, is only part of the process 
of deflation and it must go on until prices 
have been regulated. For instance, does 
anyone believe that rents will remain at their 
present figure for very long? It is only the 
fact that housing facilities have not been 
provided keeps them there. Just as quickly 
as building materials and labor come down 
there is going to be a feverish building of 
homes. In the meanwhile, as soon as spring 
comes again, a very general removal to 
commuting centers will take place. People 
will not pay the rents asked if this can be 
avoided by a removal to the country. In 
the case of rent the paying is in many in- 
stances not avoidable but when it comes to 
the purchasing of necessities and luxuries it 
is comparatively easy to avoid giving in to 
the profiteer. 

A tacit agreement between the women 
folk,, who hold the family sack, had been 
arrived at before the holidays to withhold 
from buying until after the hectic season 
was over. A trip through the retail district 
shows that the merchants are offering a cer- 
tain class of goods as "leaders" but that 
prices have by no means been brought down 
in those goods which are worth while con- 
sidering as purchases. The "buyers' strike" 
will surely continue until the retailer has 
decided that he will follow the wholesalers' 
lead and pocket his loss, if in truth there is 
any. The manufacturer and the whole- 
saler or jobber is already back on a near- 
normal base but the retailer still clings to 
his war-time profits and he must be shaken 
loose before the buyers' strike can be de- 
clared off. 

Money is slightly easier in banking circles. 



The peak of borrowing has been passed 
without any attendant panic. The sloughing 
off which has taken place in Wall Street 
within the last two weeks has been a very 
good thing. 

From the beginning of January to the 
middle of February the merchant will have 
to turn his attention to the replenishing of 
depleted stocks. From February on, the 
best authorities in eastern centers predict a 
resumption of fairly good times. 



SHIPPING— The news that the Shipping 
Board has made a very large amount of 
money in its operations has come to most 
of us as a surprise. It would be interesting 
to find out just how this has been figured. 
Official results relating to public utilities 
under Government of municipal control are 
very reliable, as they give results arrived at 
by a very different method from that in use 
by corporations. The report of profits by 
the Shipping Board is agreeable news in- 
deed, and doubly agreeable, if true. 



INSURANCE— The aftermath of the elec- 
tion brings many pleasurable myths to the 
surface and furnishes topics for conversa- 
tion. In insurance circles there is a story 
that Alexander McCabe, the ex-secretary of 
Hiram Johnsan, and now insurance commis- 
sioner, is spoken of for postmaster general. 
That is surely a funny story. 

Things are unusually quiet in insurance 
circles. There is, of course, the row and 
intrigue on regarding the mutuals but that 
kind of thing is always seasonal. 



MINING — There has been a fear ex- 
pressed in California mining circles that, 
owing to the very heavy snows in the moun- 
tains, mining operations might be delayed 
for a long time when springs opens up. 
Mining shares in general have shown a 
healthy tone and the tendency has been to a 
greater buoyancy in the market marked by 
heavier buying. Broken Hills has shown a 
remarkable advance on heavier buying, 
reaching 20 cents. The Comstocks are hold- 
ing up well, Ophir advancing. In the 
Tonopah Divide issues some strength has 
been developing and all along the line there 
has been a more optimistic feeling in mining 
circles. 




Would You Preserve Your Lustrous Eyes? 

Use Murine Eye Remedy 

No Dressing Table Complete Without 

, E Murine As An Eye Tonic liquid 




DIVIDEND NOTICE 

BANK OF ITALY 

Southeast Corner Montgomery and Clay Streets. 

Market Street Branch, Junction Market, Turk and 

Mason Streets. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1920, a 

dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 

per cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 

on and after January 3. 1921. Dividends not called 

for are added to and bear the same rate of interest 

as the principal from January 1, 1921. Deposits made 

on or before January 10, 1921, will earn interest from 

lanuary 1, 1921. 

A. P. GIANNINI. President. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK 

783 Market Street, Near Fourth. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1920, a 

dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) per 

cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable on 

and after January 3, 1921. Dividends not called for 

are added to and bear the same rate of interest as 

the principal from January 1, 1921. Deposits made on 

or before January 10, 1921, will earn interest from 

January 1, 1921. 

H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 
SECURITY SAVINGS BANK 

316 Montgomery Street. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1'>2U, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum on savings deposits, payable on 
and after January 3. 1921; dividends not called for 
arc added and bear the same rale of interest as 
the principal from January 1. 1921; deposits made on 
or before January 10, 1921, will earn interest from 
January 1, 1921. 

EDWARD D. OAKLEY, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

THE HIBF.RNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN 

SOCIE1 i' 

Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Streets. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1920, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum on all deposits, payable on and 
after Monday, January 3, 1921. Dividends not 
drawn will be added to depositors' accounts, become 
a part thereof, and will earn dividends from January 
1. 1921, Deposits made on 01 before January 19, 
['21, will draw interest from January 1, 1921. 

K. M. TOB1N, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

ITALIAN-AMERICAN BANK 

Southeast Corner Montgomery ami Sacramento 

Streets. (North Beach Branch, Columbia 

Avenue and Broadway) 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1 

dividend has been declared at the rale of four (4) 

per cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 

on and after January 3, 1921. Dividends not called 

for will be added to the principal and bear the same 

ral "1 interest from January 1, 1921. Deposits 

made on or before January 10, 1921, will earn 

interest from January 1, 1921. 

A. SBARBORO, President. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY 
"Montgomery and Post Streets. (Branch, 706 Market 
Street, opposite Third) 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1920, a 
dividend hi been declared at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 
I after January 3, 1921. Dividends not called 
for are added to the deposit account and earn 
dividend from January 1, 1921. Deposits made on 
or before January 111. 1921. will earn interest from 
January 1, 1921. 

JAMES K. MOFFITT, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 
FRENCH-AMERICAN BANK OF SAILINGS 
(Savings Department) 108 Sutter Street. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1920, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 
i" cent per annum on all deposits, payable on and 
after January 3, 1921. Dividends not called for are- 
added to and bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from January 1, 1921. Deposits made on 
or before January HI, 1921, will earn interest from 
lanuary 1. 1921. 

LEON BOCQUERAZ. President. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

l VION TRl ST COMPANY OF SAX FRANCISCO 

Junction of Market Street. Grant Avenue and 

O'Farrell Street. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1920, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four 14) 
per lit per annum on all savings deposits, payable 
on and after Monday, Jai I. Dividend* 

not called for are added to and bear the same rate of 
interest as the principal from January I. 1921 
Money deposited on or before January 10, 1921, will 
earn interest from lanuarv 1. 1921. 

F. J. BRICKWEDEL. Cashier. 



January 1, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 




PL/EASURD'S WAND 

"Obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Symphony Orchestra at Curran. 

The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, 
under the direction of Alfred Hertz, will 
enter upon the second half of its season with 
a pair of symphony concerts in the Curran 
Theatre Friday and Sunday afternoons, De- 
cember 3 1 and January 2. The program for 
these concerts was made up in response to 
numerous requests for each of the numbers 
listed. The principal item will be the 
"Pathetique" symphony of Tschaikowsky, 
unquestionably one of the most beautiful 
and most popular of all symphonic works. 
The second half of the program is made up 
of the Prelude to "The Afternoon of a 
Faun" of Debussy, and Liszt's "Les Pre- 
ludes." 

On the following Sunday afternoon the 
next popular concert will be given, the pro- 
gram for which is made up of well estab- 
lished favorites. The principal number will 
be the "Unfinished" symphony in B minor 
of Schubert. Schubert will also be repre- 
sented by the well known "Military March." 
Other numbers programmed are the 
"Oberon" Overture of Weber. Wagner's 
overture to "The Mastersingers." Liadow's 
"Enchanted Lake" and "Kikimora," the 
"Fra Diavolo" Overture of Auber, and the 
Bach-Gounod "Ave Maria," the violin 
obbligato in the latter number being played 
by Louis Persinger. 



Alcazar Attractions. 

"For the Defense," New York's newest 
mystery melodrama, will be presented at the 
Alcazar for the first time on this Coast at 
the matinee Sunday, January 2, featuring 
Richard Bennett. The core of the mystery 
is the murder of a Hindu "fakir" who treats 
his patients, mostly young, pretty or wealthy 
women, by hypnotic suggestion. The hero 
is the district attorney, personated by Dudley 
Ayres. The heroine, enacted by Elwyn 
Harvey, is his fiancee, one of the many upon 
whom suspicion has fallen. 

"Civilian Clothes." the phenomenally suc- 
cessful after-the-war comedy, has been se- 
cured from Oliver Morosco, for the week 
commencing January 9. 



Orpheum. 

Beginning Sunday matinee, next week's 
novelties at the Orpheum are: Jeanette 
Hackctt and Harry Delmar will have a dance 
shop with the assistance of a group of beau- 
tiful sales girls. 

Fred Fenton and Sammy Fields' appear- 



ance invariably means amusement of the 
best and highest order. 

Stella Tracey and Carl McBride, two 
artists who joined hands in "Bits of Exclus- 
iveness," is a singing act that is distinct, 
different and entertaining. 

Joe Towle, who states that his mission in 
life is to make folks laugh, will make good 
his statement with a monologue. 

Lucy Gillett, "the Lady from Delft," will 
offer an exhibition of dexterity said to be 
unrivalled. 

Ralph Dunbar's old time darkies comprise 
a colored quartette. 

The three original Regals, known as the 
"Village Blacksmiths," will present a remark- 
able act. 

Emily Ann Wellman, with her large and 
capable company, will repeat her success, 
"The Actor's Wife." 



Management of the show is again in the 
hands of Robert W. Martland, State secre- 
tary of the California Automobile Trades 
Association. 



PERFECTION ITSELF 

The new Stutz car with all the 1921 fea- 
tures, cannot be excelled in any of the re- 
spects to which motorists attach the highest 
importance. In these days of elegant models 
and superior mechanical quality a car has 
to be a veritable wonder to command the 
admiration of the true connoisseurs. Such 
is the 1921 Stutz. 



THE THREE WHITE KUHNS 

Techau Tavern in obtaining the engage- 
ment of the Three White Kuhns, premier 
musical masters direct from the Orpheum 
and Pantages circuits, has added a remark- 
able attraction to an already unique pro- 
gram of high-class entertainment. The 
Kuhns are the originators of their type of 
musical act, and also are the composers of 
many melodies, which are featured each 
evening at the Techau Tavern. The 1921 
Artists' Revue, a wonderful array of pretty 
girls and costumes in new acts, is a bewilder- 
ment of loveliness. The Techau Tavern 
dance orchestra with Elliston R. Ames as 
musical director, continues to hold its title as 
the best jazz orchestra that San Francisco 
possesses. The holiday season is replete with 
unique novelties, which of themsel\es are 
well worth a visit to this famous hostelry, 
besides the enjoyment of repasts on which 
the fame of Techau Tavern has always 
rested. 



The Grocer — Yes'm, the high price of mustard 
is due to the scarcity of fuel. You see, people are 
buying up mustard and are keeping themselves warm 
with poultices! Melbourne Punch. 

SYmphoNY 

ORCHESTRA 

AtfiR£Dfta*TZ ----- Conductor. 
CONCERT SUNDAY 

CURRAN THEATRE -:- 2:45 P. M. 

PROGRAMME 

Symphony No. 6 "Pathetique" T schat\ou>s\y 

Prelude to "The Afternoon of a Faun" Debussy 

"Les Preludes" Liszt 

SUNDAY. JANUARY 9. "POP" CONCERT 




J Cy^mw. fruaut L m 5 



Next Week— Starting Sunday 

Hackett & Delmar 

With n n-vr of Beautiful Sale* Girls 

IQF. TOWLE 

Fenton & Fields I Tracey & McBride 



L1VY niLLBTT 



DISBARS PARRIES 



t>Klf»IS vL RE'lALS 



TOPICS OF I' IV 



INTKRNATIONAI. ' 



ORCIIf STRA 



THE OAKLAND AUTO SHOW 
Oakland is busy preparing for the Auto 
Show. This year the motorists of the east 
bay region are looking forward to the 
biggest and best show in the history of the 
industry in Alameda county, and judging 
from the success attained in carrying out the 
preliminary plans they will not be disap- 
pointed. The Oakland Auto Show this year 
promises to set new standards for western 
motor salons. It will be held in the great 
Oakland Auditorium, one of the finest mu- 
nicipal buildings in the country. 



Emil y Ann Wellman & Co. 

Matinoos— -J.v to ll.no Ewr Intr — O to $I.SO 

MATINEE DAILY— Ph.,ne Poiiila; TO 

Srmlpers* T . >n?d 

ALCAZAR 

Black Face Comedy— "COME SEVEN" 

WEEK COM NEXT SUM MAT.. JAN. 2 

The Hindu My»lery Melodrama. Recent Seven 
Months Sensation at The Playhouse. New York. 

"FOR THE DEFENSE 

By Elmer L. Rice, author of "On Tnal." 

\R COMP- 

DUDLEY AYRES-ELWYN HARVEY 

MAT JAN. 9— Special Alcazar Release 

The Enormouslv Popular Afler-lhe-War Comedy 

"CIVILIAN CLOTHES" 

This o the Faraou. Spolen Play. 

Every Evening. Matinees* Sun.. Than-. Sat. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January I, 1921 



Stealing Labor In Detroit 

Aftermath of the Greatest of Booms 

By Julius R. Levick 



THE QUESTION is asked every day in 
San Francisco, "What will all the 
men out of work do, when they find 
that employment cannot be had at the old 
scale of wages?" 

Having seen no estimates of the number 
of men out of employment in San Francisco 
I am unable to say whether the idle hands 
this winter : re more numerous than usual. 
There is no signs of distress, I am happy to 
say, and in all likelihood California and the 
Pacific Coast will be booming ahead as usual 
in a few weeks. 

As to several of the Eastern cities, there is 
specific information about unemployment. 
Detroit, which has surpassed all American 
cities in its industrial success since it adopted 
the open shop method fifteen years ago and 
secured the profitable automobile industry, 
has been toying with the unemployment 
problem. 

Having more money than it knows what 
to do with, Detroit established an emergency 
"bureau of employment," before it took 
pains to learn if such a benevolent depart- 
ment were needed. The facts that have been 
brought to light are more assuring than 
pathetic. 

According to the calamity howlers, there 
were 75,000 unemployed in Detroit, yet 
Mayor Couzens found it impossible to en- 
gage a thousand men "to clear the streets 
and do other city labor at $6 a day." Never 
before in the history of "hard times" had an 
American or any other Mayor of a large in- 
dustrial center been confronted by such an 
impossible problem. The Detroit Mayor 
gave up the attempt to solve it when only 
eight jobless men could be found who would 
clean streets for $6 a day, or collect garbage 
at $6.50 a day. 

The Detroit newspapers have concluded 
that after years of employment at fabulous 
wages in automobile factories, the idle 
workers in Detroit are too proud to perform 
menial public service at $6 a day. That ex- 
planation has no weight with me. as I have 
seen first class mechanics, by the hundred, 
in San Francisco, glad to shovel sand for 
one dollar a day. Some of the San Fran- 
cisco boulevards, of which our city is proud, 
were chiefly constructed by such emergency 
service. The men who accepted the pittance 
were really in need. They preferred such 
toil to the humiliating bread line or soup 
kitchen. Their plight was actual and 
pitiable. They possessed the true American 
grit and the independence which makes all 
necessary and honest toil honorable: For 



the able-bodied worker, who would hunger 
before accepting $6 a day offered in a 
benevolence spirit we can have but much- 
modified sympathy. 

The trouble, if any, in Detroit, is that the 
boom in automobile building is changing for 
more substantial and permanent conditions. 
Booms of all kinds are followed by reactions. 
The industrial world has never seen anything 
like the development of the automobile 
trade in America, and particularly Detroit. 
The amount of money .poured into it and dis- 
tributed through every channel of trade is 
incalculable. To expect such a boom to last 
interminably would be ridiculous. The 
world cannot get along without motor vehicles 
any more, but their manufacture must be 
conducted on sound business principles. In 
Detroit there has been a scramble for labor 
during several' years. Stealing labor has 
been a recognized but unwise industry. Big 
companies in need of workmen have been in 
the habit of sending out trucks to construc- 
tion jobs and having agents bawl out offers 
of $12 a day to every mechanic who desired 
to accept. "Every man who wants $12 a 
day for eight hours' work, get aboard this 
truck ! " Whereupon workers would drop 
their tools and seek the proffered employ- 
ment! 

It is not in the nature of things that such 
conditions should be continued and the wise 
men are those that expect a halt and have 
prepared for the inevitable emergency. 



IMPORTANT RAILROAD 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Sunset Route via New Orleans has 
been reopened for through travel January 
1, 1921, on the basis of passenger fares 
applying via other routes to and from prac- 
tically the territory served at equal fares by 
the Sunset Route for 37 years prior to the 
closing of the New Orleans gateway in Octo- 
ber, 1919, by the order of the then Railroad 
Administration. 

This announcement was made recently by 
Chas. S. Fee, passenger traffic managei. 
Southern Pacific, who said: "An unsuccess- 



ful attempt was made a few months ago to 
prevent the re-establishment of these equal 
fares over the Sunset Route and through the 
New Orleans gateway but the new Southern 
Pacific tariff filed recently received the ap- 
proval of the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion and will become effective January 1 , 
next. 

"The reopening of the New Orleans gate- 
way and the restoration of pre-war fare ad- 
justments via that gateway means the return 
to the public of the advantages of this 
popular route which was so well patronized 
prior to Federal control and further, recog- 
nizes the right of the Southern Pacific Lines 
to compete for traffic via New Orleans be- 
tween points like Chicago, Louisville, Cincin- 
nati and points beyond and all points in Cali- 
fornia at fares equal to those in effect via 
any other line." 



THE AUTOMOBILE 

(Continued from Page 15) 
vented. Such a belt should be cleaned. 
There should, of course, be a slight slippage 
of the belt, because one which is too tight 
will be subject to undue wear, but there is 
a happy medium tension which common 
sense will dictate. 

Using the Clutch 
Always let the clutch in gradually. Never 
release it suddenly, because this will jerk the 
whole driving mechanism, and set up un- 
necessary strains. 

Cooling Water Temperature 

The best temperature for the cooling 
water, under normal operating conditions for 
the ordinary type of motor car engine, is 
somewhere around 170 degrees Fahrenheit. 
It is well to remember this, especially in cold 
weather when radiators are partially covered 
and hoods are bundled up. 



To some people Washington Square is ihe center 
of at! originality in Art, Literature and Philosophy 
in the United States. To others it is the place 
where the busses turn around and start back. — Smart 
Set. 



Where is the woman now who 
> drink?— Life. 



drive a man 



A tourist reports seeing (he following police regu- 
lations posled up in Ireland. "Until further notice 
every vehicle must carry a light when darkness 
begins. Darkness begins when the lights are lit." 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



We Stand for the Best in Business Training 




Si School 



Munson 



Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 

Send for Catalog 



Potted Plants 
and Ferns 

OF DISTINCTION 

SUITABLE FOR ANY 

OCCASION AT NURSERY 

PRICES 

Bay Counties Seed Co. and 

Nurseries 

404 Market Street, San Francisco 



PROMPT SERVICE 

is a feature of our daily luncheon. You can 
dine here in 30 minutes or less if you wish 

SPECIAL LUNCHEON, $1.00 

OR SHORT ORDERS A LA CARTE 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNER, $1.75 

Sunday and Week Days 

DANCING 

6 TO 9 EVERY EVENING 
BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old P00DLE-D0G Co. 

421 BUSH STREET. ABOVE KEARNY 
Phone Douglas 241 1 



AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE 
EXCLUSIVELY 

Union Indemnity Exchange 

of California 

Better Rates Quicker Service 

HAVE MOVED TO 

256 MONTGOMERY STREET 

S. E. Corner of Pine St. 

Telephone Sutler 2645— Sutler 2646 



[uality 

TIRE SHOP 

Expert Tire and 
Tube Repairers 

Quality Retreading 



MARSHALL SQUARE 
VULCANIZING CO. 

10 Marshall Square 

tlyde St. near Market 
Phone Market 3837 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles to the Gallon" 



Associated Oil Company 



Sharon Bldg. 



San F 



an f ranasco 



AUTOMOBILE STARTING AND 
LIGHTING SYSTEMS 

Give satisfactory results when given proper at- 
tention. We specialize on Electrical equipment, 
storage batleries, etc., and guarantee satisfaction. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

Brand &t Cushman 
955 Post St. Phone Prospect 741 



W. W. HEALEY 

notary public 

insuranh; broker 

208 crocker building 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



^vjKf-^sjv- .-.--.. .v.; .... . ?.„;..; ....... ...... ; .... . i . . 



£>an iFranrtsrn (LTirmttrlr 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 



A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for 90 cent* a 

month - including Sunday edition. 

Write to The Chronicla or tell your neareat newsdealer or postmaster. 






>♦»»»»»♦»»»»»»»♦»»»»»»»»»»»»«>«)»»»««»»«>»*)»)♦»»♦♦» » »»»)♦♦*) t«>»«»)»»X 37-45 FIRST STREET 5 \\ FRANCISCO 




'ILIIHID IHI 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 
BnaJneai Luncheon it a. m, t<> 2 p, m. 

548 Sacramento St.. cor. Leidutdorff 



Fourth St. Garage 

423 4th St., near Harrison St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Excellent Service 

Convenient 

Spacious 

Tires and Accessories 

PHONE GARFIELD 600 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Coven 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than seems necessary." The 
typewriter papers are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
tn similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through your printer or stationer, or. if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the entire 
line. 

BLAKE, MOFrTTT & TOWNE 

ruiMT 1 I 



PRICE REDUCED ON 

KEATON MS 



Taking effect at once and in advance of factory cost adjustment 




Trade in your present worn equipment for Keaton Non- Skids at the 
reduced price and avoid danger of skidding 

Keaton Tire & Rubber Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND LOS ANGELES PORTLAND SEATTLE 



^ 




Established July 20 1856 






PRICE 10 CENTS 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 8, 1921 



AND 

(Mtfflrtua Afconrttfifr 
$5.00 PER YEAR 



FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY 

Affiliated with The First National Bank of San Francisco 
SAVINGS-COMMERCIAL-TRUST 



Head Office, Post and Montgomery Streets 
Market Street Branch, 706 Market Street 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF CONDITION DECEMBER 31, 
RESOURCES 

hirst Mortgage Loans on Real Estate 

Bankers' Acceptances 

Other Loans and Discount 

State. County. Municipal and School District Bonds 

Other Resources 

United States Bonds ... 

1 States Certificates of Indebtedness 
Cash and due from Banks 

Total 



1920 



..$ 7 

I 
I 



575.891.57 

.829.249.04 

7il.2l9.lt- 

.447.632.55 

17.583.63 

,596.327.70 






Capital 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 

Deposits 

Other Liabilities 

Dividends Unpaid 



i iahii mi s 



5 I. * 0.000.00 

441. V. 

24 

45.000.00 



Total 



$23.5<>- 



OFFH 



RUDOLPH SPRFCU I > President C 

CLINTON f. WORDI \ Vice-President R 

J. G. HOOPER Vice Pre*, and Trust Officer M 

O. K. CUSHINC We-Pre.idenl I 

I K. MOFFITT Cashier and Secret.! 



H \|. (ORMICK Treasurer 

R. PARDOW \..,.t«nl Secrel.rs 

R ( LARK V.islanl Caihier 

V McCRI - <lanl Trust Officer 

\V. DP ml Secretary 



B. HOBSON 

F. MULLI \ 
. tl CAMI RON 



MARK! 1 STR1 IT BR 



Branch Mai 

'*nl Cashier 



Wvall H Allen 
John F. Brooke 
O. K. CushinK 
J. G. Hooper 
Thomas Jennings 



DIRFC1 

■ II Kroll 
Waller S Martin 
R. D V 
I k Moftit 
James D. Phelan 



Savings Deposits made on or before January 10, 

January 1. 1921. 



W T. Smilh 
Rudolph Spreckels 
Rolla V. Wall 
George U'hiltell 
Clinton E. Worden 

1921, will earn interest from 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

1174 Phelan Building, San r ranciaco 

Has a practical system of placing manuscripts for 
publication, which is important to people who write 

Frank criticism and competent revision are also 
available. 





For that stubborn cough 




Use 


Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 




SNAKE DRUG CO. 






Formerly G. Leipnilz & Co. 






Now Located at 






127-129 KEARNY ST. 





MacRORIE - McLAREN CO. 

FLORISTS. NURSERYMEN 

and 
LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Mateo 

Phone San Mateo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



CLOCK 

REPAIRING 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specialty 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

country 

We carry an attractive line of new clocks 

Work guaranteed in every detail 

CALIFORNIA CLOCK CO. 

418-19 Whitney Bldg. 133 Geary Street 

Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping. Manager 











Our Entire 
Stock of 

Exclusive 
FURS 

at Reductions 
Ranging up to 
^(J per cent. 






LOUIS GASSNER, Inc. 

1 1 2 Geary Street 





AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



$ 23,828.500.00 
16,375,000.00 



Aggregate Assets. 30th 
Sept. 1919 




$377,721,211.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

351 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian Stales. New Zealand. Fiji, Papua (New 

Guinea), and London, The Bank transacts every descru : I Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 29 THREADNF.F.DLF. STREET. E. C. 2 

Agents : 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENG.: NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.: SEATTLE. WASH.: MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. I. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7lh Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31, 1920 

Assets $69,878,147.01 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits 66.338.147.01 Reserve and Contingent Fund. 2.54O.O00.0O 

Employees' Pension Fund $343,536.85 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNY, Vice-Pres. and Manage. A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER. Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH COODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

COODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE 6V ORRICK. General Attorneys 



BOND DEPARTMENT 






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THE ANGLO AND LONDON 


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Phone Kearny 5600 


NATIONAL BANK 






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For Income Tax Exempt {Qonds, as 


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VOL. XCIX 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 8, 1921. 



No. 2 









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Dfci. MO\TE POLO CLLli TROPHY 
I'niquc una 1 Beautiful H'orfc in firm;,:. SfcJelcJ I) A/im /.ua'Hir SchocnfelJ and rroufhl ty 5nfc>t fr Cowpony. fSft Pft /¥^_ 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8, 1921 



■DIToMAL 




The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marrictt, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Keamy 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second- 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year, $5.00. Foreign : One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

What will become of that sacrosanct document, the 

Death Blow Clayton anti-trust act, if the decision of the United 

to Boycotting States Supreme Court, that it cannot be used for 

sinister purposes, is to be upheld? And who is not 

going to uphold the highest tribunal in the land? 

The Clayton anti-trust act was designed to operate on a swivel, 
so that all employers coming within its scope could be trapped as 
jail-birds; but all labor politicians ensnared in its meshes should be 
petted as birds of a totally different feather — in fact, harmless and 
angelic creatures whose restraint behind bars would be a crime 
against Sacred Democracy. 

Naturally the Clayton anti-trust act became a fine incentive to 
boycotters of the Bolshevik variety, and wherever there was found 
a manufacturing concern operating on the American plan, there 
were the unshaven harbingers of industrial strife found croaking 
"unfair-sky" 

But the Supreme Court of the United States has decreed that 
Uncle Sam's anti-trust net should be flung over the boycott song- 
birds as well as capitalistic rooks caught in the profiteering field. 

How ridiculous it seems that a Supreme Court should ever be 
asked to decide such a self-evident proposition of law and justice! 
Cowardly and dishonest lawmakers continually beslobber the statute 
books with their idiotic mush. It is a pity they cannot be fed on it 
till they croak. 

When Sam Gompers fully realizes what the United States Supreme* 
Court has done to his Falstaff army of sandwich-board and mega- 
phone boycotters he will buy a ticket back to Whitechapel and shake 
the dust of America forever from his feet. 

This new decision of the Supreme Court, which knocks the labor 
trust completely off its underpinning, embodies the some principles 
of right and wrong that were argued years ago in the Danbury 
hatters case. The organized union hatters made a nation-wide war 
on an open-shop hat factory in Danbury. The union boycott was 
carried clear to the Pacific Coast, but the boycotted firm was headed 
by a very courageous man who fought his enemies to a finish in the 
Supreme Court of the United States. It was decided that the 
Danbury hatters' union which had caused such injury to the non- 
union manufacturer should be made to pay for its fun. Judgment 
was rendered against the members of the union, « who had any 
property which could be attached, and many of these were placed 
in an unenviable predicament. Their homes and savings bank 
accounts were levied on, and no doubt many a comfortable family 
in Danbury rued the day they violated the law. 

That Danbury hatters case would have stopped a great deal of the 
outrageous boycotting which has been carried on for the past ten 
years in some of the large cities of America, but at the very moment 
when the boycotters were on their knees and crying for mercy, the 
courageous head of the Danbury firm who had fought his case to 
victory in the courts, died. The new men who succeeded him in the 



management of the factory, were of a different quality of Ameri- 
canism. They at once began to dicker with the defeated boycotters 
and ended by signing a truce with them which was supposed to 
confer some business advantages. Few men have the courage to 
carry to a bitter end a war on such a powerful organization as the 
labor trust of the United States. 

Now in a new form, the Supreme Court of the United States 
declares that there cannot be two laws dealing with injurious trusts 
and invasions of constitutional liberty — one law for capital and 
another law for labor. The laws of our land must bear evenly on all 
classes or we shall end in anarchy. 



San Francisco is about to have another piece 
Time to Wake Up of political jobbery put over on her. We are 
to have our legislative apportionment reduced. 
Living in a sort of political fool's paradise, we continually fling 
verbal bouquets at one another, and recount all the natural 
advantages of our position as the great seaport of the Pacific. 

But while we are charming one another with words the busy Los 
Angelenos are astonishing the remainder of the United States with 
deeds. Long ago they convinced the East and Middle West that 
Los Angeles was the true metropolis of the Pacific, and now they 
are directing their efforts to proving how rapidly they are going 
ahead and how fast San Francisco is falling into that stage which 
a great President of the United States designated as "innocuous 
desuetude" — the category of the "also rans," the "down and out," 
the old "have beens." 

Do leaders of our San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, who 
happen to live and pay taxes on this side of our bay, ever stop to 
figure how much papulation our city might have attained had it 
proceeded as rapidly as the Los Angeles boomers. 

Thirty years ago Los Angeles was practically a Spanish village 
and San Francisco was a city acknowledged to have a great future. 
In the one generation which has passed San Francisco would now 
have a population of over three millions, had its growth been similar 
to that of Los Angeles. Those are astonishing figures but any 
school boy can make the calculation. We have not improved our 
opportunities as we should. The disastrous fire through which we 
passed in 1906 does not fully explain the sensational growth of Los 
Angeles and the halt in the commercial and industrial march of San 
Francisco. Perhaps a better explanation might be discovered in 
the untrammeled industrialism of the southern city and the paralysis 
of enterprise due to labor politics in our city government. 

In the late eighties Los Angeles had scarcely any legislative rep- 
resentation at Sacramento. Senator del Valle, a polished Spaniard, 
looked after the legislative interests of Los Angeles and San Ber- 
nardino, and whenever he had a political favor to ask threw himself 
on the tender mercies of the San Francisco delegation, like a poor 
relation asking help from a millionaire. Today the Los Angeles 
delegation assumes all the airs of legislative superiority. San Fran- 
cisco is the tail of the dog and when the animal barks the San 
Francisco solons retain a discreet attitude, lest another piece be 
bitten out of them. 

The new apportionment which Los Angeles is determined to force 
on San Francisco will rob us of one senator and one assemblyman. 
The plan will add two new senators and six new assemblymen to the 
Los Angeles delegation. The full delegation from San Francisco 
will consist of ten senators and twenty-one assemblymen; San 
Francisco will have only five senators and ten assemblymen. We 
can imagine what the advertising talent of Los Angeles will do with 
such proofs of civic prosperity. 

There is some consolation to be drawn from our humiliation. The 
lawmakers we have been sending to Sacramento are such a sorry 
lot it should make little difference to San Francisco if they were cut 
off altogether and their salaries saved. 



January 8, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Thought and Sex Relations 

By Francis Marshal Pierce. 



IS IT NOT EVIDENT that humanity is en- 
gaged with a crisis, blindly groping for 
some way out of it while rushing deeper 
into its swirl, and that there are few of our 
clearest minds, and not one ruling intellect 
which grasps or recognizes the appalling 
condition the world is in? Sweeping on to 
the vortex, there is little time to snatch from 
the mad rush in which to look for causes or 
the source of the catastrophe. Human 
thought is so tossed and jumbled in the sur- 
face surge that it can hardly disengage itself 
from this to plunge beneath the commotion 
to find the secreted cause. Men find little 
time for giving thought to Thought ; to what 
Thought is; the nature of it; its function 
and power; and what results from Thought. 

"Thoughts are things." So says a wise 
philosophy. And casual observation con- 
firms this truth. Search the universe and 
every visible thing in it is. Thought mani- 
fest. And in the invisible realm. Thought 
creates and impells every energy and force. 
Thought, then, is the intangible and supreme 
creative and operative energy in existence. 
There is spiritual or divine thought and ma- 
terial thought; and spiritual thought would 
base and control material thought were man 
existing in his natural state of soul directed 
life, instead of having almost wholly lost 
spiritual knowledge in material life and 
sensation. 

What is the secreted but dominant thought 
of humanity today — of the Occidental 
world in particular? It is not of war or 
peace; not of the general unrest and threat- 
ening chaos; nor of wealth or poverty; nor 
of human misery or happiness — for it is 
sensual passion. 

It is this thought which is the basic cause 
of the present human cataclysm. It is a 
cancer in the heart of society, corrupting 
and eating away the foundation virtue of 
life-pure love, and is destroying the race in 
body, mind, heart and soul. 

The once popular, if incorrect theory that, 
men are the aggressive, responsible factor in 
sex relations, is no longer a whole truth, if 
it ever has been. 

A significant feature of the disease which 
has humanity in its grip is. that it is most 
prevalent in the so-called upper strata of 
society, among the wealthy. Most of all is it 
dangerous, with the intellectual, educated 
class; those who are looked to for refine- 
ment and culture — and the virtues. Among 
those it may be more masked, but is no less 
insidious, when spread as a kind of ascetic 
indulgence. 

If a comparative morality is sought for. 
it is with the great middle, intelligent 



stratum. The doers of the world's work. 
With these intolerance and social banish- 
ment is meted out to what are common prac- 
tices and lapses in the ranks of the "High- 
ups." By contrast, there is health and 
wholesomeness in this most of all intelligent 
stratum. 

It is in the subtle potency of thought that 
the jeopardy to humanity lies. For impure 
thought affects all thought, clean and un- 
clean. And as humanity is not on guard 
mentally, the mind of the race, as a whole, 
is open to whatever is let free into the 
mental atmosphere of the world. So mil- 
lions of minds which are balancing between 
morality and letting go of it, are impercept- 
ably influenced downward to swell the cor- 
rupted host. 

Seldom is one out of hearing of the gen- 
eral discussion and talk of sex relations. 
And the rottenness which is given expression 
tells the story. While this is significant of 
the need for no longer treating this infec- 
tious condition with false modesty, but as 
a public matter of the utmost concern, and 
that it has to be aired, it is no less a vital 
fact to the life of the race. And this shame- 
less disgrace is proof of race decadence. 
For how can a race survive with foulness in 
its blood, rendering it heartless and soul- 
less; and polluting its thought and making 
its physical being a charnel pit? 

Surely, the union of the sex is to per- 
petuate the race — human life. Not merely 
of the human animal, as a perfect physical 
being, as the acme of physical life, but as 
a rational, thinking entity, in which there is 
an immortal soul — the divine part of a 
human being. This constitutes man a trinity 
of the physical, mental and spiritual, and it 
should be a Holy Trinity, under control o( 
the divine soul. 

The union of sex is a divine provision for 
the prime need of life on earth, for the evo- 
lution of the soul, and the perfection of man. 
Without it life would cease to materialize. 
By the prostitution of this sacredness man 
has made of himself a pit of decay. In 
thought he has degraded this spiritual rela- 
tion below a purely animal function, even, 
by subverting the creative passion to a fierce 
fire of consuming lust, which works devasta- 
tion, and renders human society a pestilan- 
tial jungle infested with beasts of prey, 
lower than the natural animals in sex rela- 
tions, and made satanic by the prostitution 
of his superior endowment of mind, heart 
and soul. 

So men and women have come to consider 
the sex relations, until many thoughtful 
people have small hope for a clean and 



wholesome society. Yet our race must live 
and perpetuate itself. 

The sex relations can be raised out of the 
sensual onto the spiritual plane of life, where 
a selfish and clean life is experienced and 
lived; and where the act of procreation be- 
comes the crowning act of love, and the 
fruit of such seeding fair, perfect and 
divine. 

What is the remedy for this present-day 
plague? Clean, wholesome thoughts. Dis- 
place the impure with pure thoughts. For, 
"As a man thinketh in his heart, so is he." 



Outlet for American Talent 

A number of prominent vocalists have 
combined under the title "The Western 
Singers" to produce grand opera in minia- 
ture at the Sorosis Hall. The company is 
co-operative and will play regularly twice a 
week for six months, offering works that 
are seldom heard in San Francisco, but 
which are standard favorites abroad. 

The first season of the Western Singers 
will open January 25 with a production of 
Beethoven's "Fidelio." 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8, 1921 



Has Builded for All Time 



IT WAS a splendid thing which M. H. de 
Young did last Sunday, in Golden Gate 
Park, when, in the presence of assembled 
thousands of his fellow citizens, he gave 
San Francisco a great Memorial Museum, 
representing in personal effort an important 
share of his life-work and in financial out- 
lay a sum which can only be guessed. It 
was a public donation of which a king might 
be proud, if kings paid for their royal gifts 
out of their private exchequers instead of 
the taxes on the people. 

Not with less ostentation, or simpler sin- 
cerity of affection for his city and its people 
could the newspaper philanthropist have ten- 
dered his magnificent tribute. It was truly 
a memorable occasion. The people had 
come to see the formal dedication of a fine 
institution, but before the ceremonies ended 
they realized that they were participants in 
an historical event of deep and lasting in- 
terest. The journalist they had known so 
long and so intimately, stood revealed to 
them in the truer and softer light of kindly 
brotherhood. The bustling man-of-affairs 
absorbed in private enterprises and the 
earnest partisan striving for party success 
was no longer in evidence. The M. H. de 
Young that the people saw, as the center of 
immediate interest, was essentially the phil- 
anthropist and the patriot. 

Not for himself had he labored all those 
years to accomplish a great work, the mag- 
nitude of which will only be recognized, long 
after the fertile brain which conceived it 
shall have ceased to plan. In all those 
decades that M. H. de Young had evolved 
his project of a splendid public museum in 
San Francisco he had been sustained by an- 
ticipation of the finest reward that genuine 
public-spiritedness can receive — just appre- 
ciation of valuable services in the better- 
ment of his fellow citizens. 

Very few men in this world have been 
able to crown their patriotic and benevolent 
work as magnificently as did the publisher 
of the San Francisco Chronicle last Sunday. 
The race is not always to the swift nor the 
battle to the strong. Perhaps the vision of 
triumphant philanthropy which Mr. de 
Young himself, so long dreamed, might never 
have been realized but for the assistance of 
his influential newspaper. How many people 
in the thousands who looked on him approv- 
ingly last Sunday, thought of the part the 
Chronicle had played in the acceleration of 
his Museum plans — the accomplishment in a 
single life of a project which usually has 
been measured in generations, centuries. 
Some of the famous museums of the world 
represent continuous effort extended over 
the greater part of a thousand years. 



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M. H. de YOUNC 
Engraved' b\> the Nelvs Letter from a Recent Portrait of the Distinguished Philanthropist. 



But twenty-seven years have been de- 
voted by Mr. de Young to the creation of 
the magnificent Museum he has given his 
city, exacting nothing in return but the 
pledge of the municipality that the institu- 
tion shall be open every day in the year ab- 
solutely free to the people. 

In twenty-seven years the preliminary 
work of the Memorial Museum might have 
been little more than done, had Mr. de 
Young been a private capitalist and forced 
to rely solely on the stimulative power of 
wealth. But he brought to the philanthropic 
task he had undertaken rare talent and ripe 
experience as a collector, and a journalist's 
knowledge of the adverse tides and cross- 
currents of politics, that must be taken into 
calculation in the creation of any great pub- 
lic benefaction. 

At the very outset Mr. de Young's philan- 
thropic ambition might have been killed by 



official objection lo the location of any 
museum in Golden Gate Park, but to the 
publisher of an important newspaper such 
obstacles were trivialities. 

Ever since the beginning was made on the 
Memorial Museum, fostering care of it has 
been one of the duties which the Chronicle 
never overlooked. The Sundays came and 
the years went, and boys who played base- 
ball in Golden Gate Park, became the staid 
fathers of families but never on a Sabbath 
that passed did San Francisco fail to read in 
its leading newspaper some news of interest 
about the city's incomparable playground 
and its growing museum. 

The sequel to such care was spoken on 
Sunday last when the thrice-eloquent United 
States Senator from San Francisco said to 
the founder of the Memorial Museum: "This 
day's work endears you not only to this great 
gathering, but to the future generations." 



January 8, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Ungallant Britons 



THE REFUSAL of Cambridge University, 
England, to admit students of women's 
colleges to full membership, has cre- 
ated much comment in the English speaking 
world. Cambridge is one of the world- 
famed institutions of learning, though smaller 
in membership than our California Uni- 
versity at Berkeley. The vote adverse to 
the women was 2329 in the negative and 
only 884 for admission. 

An interesting discussion in the news- 
papers has followed, the men's side of the 
question being stated by the Master of 
Trinity College, and the women's by the 
Mistress of Girton College. 

The former declared he had no objection 
to granting women degrees and throwing 
open all university scholarships to them. He 
saw no advantage, however, but many dis- 
advantages in giving women votes on the 
policy of the university or a seat on the 
boards of study. 

"The presence of women on our boards of 
study," he said, "would tend inevitably to 
raise questions as to differences in the regu- 
lations for men and women and would make 
a problem already difficult enough still more 
difficult." 

To this the Mistress of Girton College re- 
plied : 

"Such a position will certainly not bring 
to Cambridge that select body of the ablest 
women whom the Master of Trinity says he 
would welcome there, nor will it help the 
women's colleges to secure or retain the 
services of such women as teachers. 

"But can such a situation be permanent? 
Is not the position similar to that of the Non- 
conformists in the middle of the last century? 
In 1856 they were allowed to take the B. A. 
degree, but the right to vote in the Senate 
was refused them. The consequence was 
discontent, an abiding sense of injustice, and 
struggles which last for fifteen years, and 
ended only in the recognition that dissenters 
were, after all, human beings and citizens 
of the State. These same truths with regard 
to women have now been recognized by all 
other British universities and by Parliament 
itself. We humbly submit that no university 
can continue to place itself in direct opposi- 
tion to a principle thus accepted by the 
nation." 

It is easy to foresee the total defeat of the 
exclusive masculine spirit in Cambridge. 




V. S. SENATOR. HON. SAUL EL M SIIORTRIDCE 

IVhose Eloquent Address at the Dedication of the Memorial Museum in Golden Cate Par^ Was a 

Feature of the Ceremonies. 



"The gentleman says he kissed you in the dark 
hall because he thought you were his wife." 

"Nonsense." 

"On your oath, was it not possible for htm to 
make an honest mistake?" 

"Yea; but it wasn't that sort of a kiss." — Judge. 




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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8, 1921 



Good Year in Realty 



PROPERTY' OWNERS in San Francisco 
will derive much comfort from the 
prediction of Thomas Magee & Sons' 
interesting realty record, that the new year 
will bring an improved real estate market. 
The past year was far from being an un- 
favorable one in real estate according to the 
Magee statistics, which are accepted in San 
Francisco as the best authority. 

Not since the year 1900 has San Fran- 
cisco had such a lively market for city 
property, announce Magee & Sons. In 1900 
there were 3259 sales recorded in San Fran- 
cisco, the total amount in cash being $18,- 
527,814. In 1905, just before the disas- 
trous fire which obliterated the business sec- 
tion of San Francisco we had a boom in 
city property which sent prices to unprece- 
dented figures. The total sales that year 
were 9572 with a value of close to 
$75,000,000. 

In the year just passed, there were 9217 
sales of San Francisco property of a value 
of $82,359,194. 

These figures indicate that many new 
owners have become interested in city prop- 
erty and that is much to be desired. New 
proprietorship causes greater confidence and 
always precedes a raise in realty values. 
After such a disaster as we had in San Fran- 
cisco in 1906 many owners of property are 
unable to rebuild. Others rebuild, but at 
such a cost that they were unable to carry 
their indebtedness and are selling out at the 
best prices they can get. 

For years the realty market in San Fran- 
cisco has been favorable to buyers. Real 
property has been the only thing which has 
not advanced in price. That statement is 
practically true of the whole suburban pen- 
insula of San Francisco, for the only places 
where any sharp advance has been recorded 
is the limited apartment house area and 
shopping district. Generally speaking real 
property has depreciated. 

The most important problem of the com- 
ing year with regard to realty is that of find- 
ing new buildings. The building trades in 
this city have come to a stoppage. Formerly 
residences could be built at $600 a room but 
now the minimum is $1000 a room, and the 
work at even that price is generally inferior. 
For small homes, that could formerly be had 
at $4000, speculative builders now ask al- 
most twice that amount. The consequence 
is thai small homes are not being sold and 
will not be built except conditions become 
changed. Los Angeles is one of the few 
places in the United States at .present where 
building is active. 

Opposition to any legislation exempting 
from taxation new buildings or income from 



mortgages is voiced in a report to the 
National Tax Association by a special com- 
mittee composed of Carl P. Plehn, Uni- 
versity of California, chairman; W. N. 
Beatty, Salt Lake City; A. B. Clark, Mani- 
toba Tax Commission; Frank B. Jess, New 
Jersey State Board of Taxes and Assess- 
ments; B. S. Orcutt, New York; A. P. 
Ramdsted, Wallace, Idaho; Attorney Gen- 
eral Frank Roberson of Mississippi; King- 
man N. Robins, Rochester; George G. Tunel, 
Chicago; and W. H. Osborne, Jr., Nebraska 
State Board of Equalization secretary. 

"It is axiomatic," says the report, "that 
taxation should be universal and that every 
person in the jurisdiction of a government 
should contribute to the support of the Gov- 
ernment in a proper proportion. The ex- 
emption of any individual or class, in part or 
in whole, is favoritism of privilege, and as 
such, is indefensible. 

"If the basis of taxation be property, all 
private property should be taxable. If the 
basis be income, all private income should 
be taxable. Exceptions to this rule should 
be technical only and should never result in 
an actual lessening of any one's fair tax 
burden. The only ground for absolute ex- 



emption from taxation, either of property or 
of income 'revenue,' is obsolute public use. 
"No sooner does a need arise for more 
dwellings," the report adds, "than it is pro- 
posed to promote building by some form of 
tax exemption. Your committee finds these 
proposals fundamentally unsound. The 
arguments by which they are supported are 
specious." 



GENEROUS BRITISH SUGGESTION 

The popular English weekly, "John Bull," 
suggests: "Everyone going into America 
has to pay a poll tax. Why not institute a 
similar duty for everyone coming to these 
shores — to be collected through the shipping 
companies? It is estimated that a million 
Americans come over here every summer, 
and at £5 a head that would mean £5,000,- 
000 towards repayment of our debt to 
them." 



PROSPECTS OF TROUBLE 

Reduction of wages in New York promises 
to cause much trouble. About 60,000 mem- 
bers of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers 
of America, unemployed due to the contro- 
versy between the union and Clothing Manu- 
facturers' Association of New York, have 
agreed to mass picketing of the shops of 
the Association. 

Members of the Association manufacture 
thirty-eight different types of garments in 
thirty-eight States. Canada and Mexico. 



THE CROCKER NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Condition at Close of Business December 29, 1920 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts $26,744,953.29 

U. S. Bond, and Certificates 6.024,206.66 

Other Bonds and Securities 1,418.572.02 

Capital Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 150,000.00 

Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit 995,886.12 

Cash and Sight Exchange 13.169.579.22 

$48,503,197.31 
LIABILITIES 

Capital _ $ 2.000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 5.654.634.49 

Circulation 1,976.597.50 

Federal Reserve Bank 2.690.000.00 

Letters of Credit 1.061.860.66 

Deposits 35,120.104.66 

$48,503,197.31 
OFFICERS 
WM. H. CROCKER, President. 
JAS. J. FAGAN. Vice-President J. M. MASTEN. Assistant Cashier. 

W. GREGG. Vice-President D. J. MURPHY. Assistant Cashier. 

J. B. McCARGAR, Vice-President A. C. READ. Assistant Cashier. 

WILLIAM W. CROCKER, Vice-President W. D. LUX, Assistant Cashier. 

F. G. WILLIS. Cashier. H. C. SIMPSON. Mgr. Foreign Department. 

G. W EBNER. Assistant Cashier. H. H. HAIGHT, Assl. Mgr. Foreign Depl. 
B. D. DEAN, Assistant Cashier. G FERIS BALDWIN, Auditor. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

WM. H. CROCKER GEORGE W. SCOTT A. F. MORRISON 

CHARLES T. CROCKER CHAS. E. GREEN S. F. B. MORSE 

JAS. J. FAGAN W. GREGG WILLIAM W. CROCKER 



January 8. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Good-bye 

By Harvey Brougham. 



G 



ompers 



! 



WHA 1 EVER ELSE may be said of 
Samuel Gompers, it can never be 
charged that he is not an adroit 
and shifty general, always ready to change 
his tactics to meet the emergency. 

Just now Mr. Gompers is in the wors! 
emergency of his long career. Defeat has 
met his organized labor politicians all along 
the line. They failed lamentably to "deliver 
the goods" at the November election. All 
the office-seekers whom Gompers decreed 
should be badly beaten, are those that have 
been most successful. 

Worst of all there has been a tremendous 
switch of American public opinion. Labor 
union politics no longer meets popular ap- 
proval, tacit or otherwise. Fhe people of 
America believe that Gompers and his asso- 
ciates have gone too far. The labor clique 
has tried to create a special class, which 
should be above the law of ordinary mortals 
and become a law unto itself. In the 
United States such social conditions cannot 
long exist. Oligarchies and dictatorships, in- 
variably spell their own doom. Public 
opinion now has doomed the Gompers 
oligarchy to perdition and oblivion. 

Seeing the writing on the wall, Gompers 
has changed his tactics. He is frantically 
denouncing what he calls a "conspiracy of 
employers against the working man." This 
fiendish conspiracy exists solely in Mr. 
Gompers' own lively imagination. The ' con- 
spiracy" against Gompers and his clique is 
the crystalized public opinion of all honest 
citizens in the United States, that our coun- 
try needs a new deal on labor methods. The 
day of Gompers. and the inner ring which 
had buttressed him for thirty years, has 
passed. Every day the intelligent American 
public realizes more than ever that new 
blood, new ideas, and more Americanism are 
essential to proper labor organization, on 
lines beneficial to humanity. Improper or- 
ganization on false lines is a curse. 

That Gompers has been the evil genius 
of the labor movement is being shown to the 
public by various public men. Only last 
week in the Spectator of Portland, Oregon, 
a very clever and influential journal pub- 
lished by Hugh Hume, well known on the 
Pacific Coast, Jonathan Bourne, former 
United States senator, furnished some in- 
structive comments on the public repudia- 
tion of Gompers and Company. Mr. Bourne 
said: 

"Without public approval, the labor move- 
ment or any other cannot hope for success, 
and. if once successful, cannot remain so. 
if that approval is forfeited. Vet Mr. 
Gompers makes no effort to win the good 



will of the public. On the contrary, he 
openly flaunts it and relies on the strike 
with all its attendant suffering, to coerce the 
public into a compliance with his policies. 
Every time he has given his support to 
measures whose primary object was to re- 
duce the people, through privations, to a 
point where they would accept dictation by 
the labor chieftains, he has forfeited the 
good opinion of the public, until now there 
is a determined reaction against his policies, 
and a corresponding loss of prestige by labor 
itself. 

"The cause of labor received a blow when 
Mr. Gompers heartily applauded the Boston 
police when they left their posts of duty and 
turned the city over to the forces of evil. 
The welfare of the wage-earner received an- 
other setback when the efforts of the coal 
miners to freeze the Nation into a compli- 
ance with their demands received unreserved 
endorsement from Mr. Gompers. The ranks 
of labor were again set reeling when 
Gompers selected the notorious anarchist, 
W. Z. Foster, to organize the steel workers 
and lead them in a strike intended to par- 
alyze one of the country's key industries. 
Mr. Gompers did all in his power to force 
this country into membership in the league 



of nations, to elect a Congress subservient 
to his dictation rather than mindful of the 
public welfare, to buy the railroads with the 
money of all the people and operate them 
by and for a small privileged class. The list 
might be continued, showing how at every 
turn Mr. Gompers and the other leaders who 
have been his abettors have contributed to 
the alienation of public opinion. 

"Inflamed by the power placed in their 
hands by the added prestige* of labor, Mr. 
Gompers and his satellites have sought to 
use it as a club to force from the people 
complete control over their welfare and their 
Government. No longer the true represen- 
tatives of labor, they have sought in the 
name of labor to make themselves National 
dictators. The present revulsion against 
their efforts prophesies the defeat of their 
plans, but the cause of labor itself will go 
to destruction with them unless the baleful 
influence of Mr. Gompers and his friends is 
shaken off before it is too late. 

"The result of the elections shows that the 
scheme of Mr. Gompers to exploit the inter- 
ests of labor for self-glorification has been 
penetrated by the voters of all classes of 
society, and the workers are fully convinced 
that their future welfare should be entrusted 
to other hands. There is a campaign on 
foot to clear the sinews of industry from the 
Gompers blight, but it is no part of that cam- 
paign to deny to any class of our citizens 
the rights given them by the constitution and 
the laws." 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 

THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS 
NATIONAL BANK 

SAN FRANCISCO 

at the Close of Business December 29th, 1920 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts. Less Rediscounts ..$ 46.460,670.04 

3.700.000.00 
8.715.441.50 
9.974.052.87 
1. 551.657.18 
11.397.301.65 

31.296.932.90 

$113,096,056.14 

..$ 5.000.000.00 
3.397.474.23 
3.661 .270.00 

. 11.397.301.65 

6.293.500.00 

883.000.00 

. 82.463.5 1 0.2O 



U. S. Bonds to Secure Circulation 
Other U. S. Bonds and Certificates 

Other Bonds 

Other Assets 



Customers' Liability on Letters of Credit and Acceptances 
Commodity Dralts in 1 ransit 
Cash and Sight Exchange 



LIABILITIES 
Capital Stock 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 
Circulation 
Letters ot Credit. Domestic and Foreign, and Accepta 



$10,540,974.63 
20.755.958.27 



Eederal Reserve Bank (secured by Government Bonds) 

Bonds Borrowed 

Deposit* 



OFFICERS 



$113,096,056.14 



HERBERT FLEISHHACKER. President. 

MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER. Yice-Pres. 

J. FRIEDLAN'DER. Vice-President 

C. F. HUNT, Vice-President. 

HARRY COE. Vice-President 

W L WILCOX. V,ce-Pre». and Cashrer. 

I \V. LILIENTHAL. |r. Y,ce-Pre»idet>l. 

FRED F. OUER. Ami. Vice-President 

V. KU.INKER. Assl Vice-President. 



J. S. CURRAN. Assl. Vice-President. 
I W. HARRISON. Asst. V,ee-Pres.dent. 
E R ALEXANDER. A»t Vice-President. 
JOHN GAYLE ANDERTON. Aaat. Csuh.er 

and Secretary. 
GEO. A VAN SMITH As... Ca^ier. 
EUGENE PLLNKETT. Aast. Caahitr. 
L. J. AUBERT. Am. Caihier. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8, 1921 



In The World of Commerce 



Looking at it from the varied standpoints 
of the investor, the speculator and the mer- 
chant we find that these arrive at different 
prognostics for the year 1921. The in- 
vestor is beginning to take a more optimistic 
view of things in general and is inclined to 
take a chance with his money. The investor 
is around picking up the bargains that offer. 
Investors might be more numerous than they 
are, which is an indication that once more 
the old saying that there is nothing more 
timid than money is made true. The specu- 
lator is taking his breath and for the moment 
has quit the anvil chorus of hammering 
down stocks on any old pretext that may 
offer. The result has been a rebound in 
stock values. This in turn has brought about 
a more cheerful feeling all along the line. 
Fhere is a very general urge on investors 
to buy now, while stocks are down as far 
as they can possibly go. And it is good 
advice. 

The merchant finds himself faced with un- 
certainty as to future values but he is now 
forced at last to take a chance after a very 
long period of hectic prosperity. This is 
especially true of the retail merchant who 
has managed to keep up a season of extra- 
ordinary profits much longer than the manu- 
facturer or the wholesaler who now scowls 
at him for his tactics. The retail merchant 
is feeling the full weight of the "buyers' 
strike" and that pressure is bound to increase 
unless there is a more marked reduction of 
retail prices. It is silly to suppose the public 
has no redress and the retailer is going to be 
made to feel a very severe application of 
every possible measure the public sees fit 
to inflict unless he mends his ways. Small 
profits, studied advertising campaigns, an 
efficiency organism, is all that is going to 
save the retailer from the vengeance of an 
outraged public. 

In labor circles it is at last being brought 
home that there must come a deflation of 
prices as far as wage is concerned. All over 
the country there has been a discharge cam- 
paign inaugurated by employers in the carry- 
ing out of a weeding out process. 



SHIPPING — Export business has taken a 
slight spurt to the better and this naturally 
has made a difference in shipping circles but 
quite generally the heavy cloud of gloom 
which descended on the exporter,, importer 
and shipping man in late October has only 
lifted very slightly. Locally, export and 
import men, while not saying that business 
is good, are in a much better situation than 
those in the same lines of business in the 
eastern centers. New York is, of course, the 
great pulsing center of business in these 



lines, and New York has not as yet emerged 
in even the slightest degree from the de- 
pression. The political confusion in Europe 
and in Asia has had a very marked effect. 
There is practically no business with Poland. 
Germany or Italy, and, in the Far East the 
agitation in California has had a very bad 
effect on the Japanese in their business rela- 
tions with this country. In China there are 
sixty-seven varieties of small-sized revolu- 
tions and each of the Tuchuns or military 
chiefs is conducting a little side show of his 
own. There is, however, a bright light 
dawning and better business is looked for 
with the coming settlement of many of these 
difficulties abroad. Italy has settled the 
Fiume question. That will open up the en- 
tire Adriatic trade, it will relieve Vienna and 
bring about active trade with all Dalmatia. 
Later on we shall have something to say 
about trading with Russia. 



INSURANCE — In insurance circles, busi- 
ness is somewhat quiet and nothing unusual 
has occurred to record. With the resump- 
tion of more active business in a retail way 
and in other directions, and with an activity 
in real estate and housing, insurance will 
reap a harvest. 



MINING — Everything points to a very 
active and successful year in Grass Valley 
and adjacent mining districts. The same 
may be said about all other California mines. 
In Angel's Camp there is much activity now 
and this will be increased later on. Opera- 
lions have been resumed at Goldfield and 
there is big development work going on in 
the Tonopah district. In the Divide the situ- 
ation is settling down to a knowledge of 
what are producers and what are not and 
when this weeding out is completed the real 
producers are going to show a very steady 
growth. The Southern Pacific has added a 
gusher a its oil wells in Elk Hills. This is of 
2500 barrels capacity daily. Reports from 
Montana show an increased interest in the 
development of the various fields. 



FEARS TO BECOME RICH 

Only on our American stage have we seen 
any character who strives hard to avoid 
being a millionaire. Lordly shipyard workers, 
in receipt of bankers' salaries, made no 
effort to avoid classification in the millionaire 
ranks, except to buy a new automobile every 
month, or a diamond bracelet for the wife on 
Saturday nights. 

A veritable anti-millionaire whom England 
is discussing is Austin Hopkinson, a member 
of the House of Commons. He insists that 
the municipality in which he resides shall 



assume the ownership of his residence and 
three acres, worth $100,000. 

Mr. Hopkinson suggests that his residence 
would serve as a good council chamber; the 
rest of the buildings could be used by clubs 
and societies for social functions, while the 
ballroom could become a source of revenue. 
The gardens include a bowling green and 
five tennis courts. 

"I expect to make further gifts of land 
and property during the next few years," he 
says, "if this is found beneficial to the dis- 
trict where I hope to live for the rest of my 
life." 

Mr. Hopkinson is a bachelor and intends 
to live in a bungalow, which he is building 
near his fine hall. 

During the war he fought first as a cavalry 
officer, and after being discharged unfit, 
joined up again, and was a private when 
elected M. P. 

He is a self-made man and worked in a 
coal mine, and as an engineer until he in- 
vented the coal-cutting machine which has 
made his fortune. 



CALIFORNIA'S VALUABLE PRUNE 
CROP 

Five million dollars is the value of the 
annual prune crop of California, according 
to H. M. Butterfield of the Division of Agri- 
cultural Education of the University of Cali- 
fornia. This State leads all other States in 
the production of plums and prunes, and this 
crop, taken as a whole, surpasses any other 
single fruit in the State, in point of bearing 
trees, it is stated. 

Plums were growing in the gardens of the 
Spanish missions of this State when George 
Washington was president. The first real 
stimulus to the industry was given in 1856 
by Louis Fallier, who brought over from 
France scions of the prune d'Agen or French 
prune. These he planted in his garden lo- 
cated in the place where now stands Santa 
Clara. 



WHAT ARE WE COMING TO? 

In November the Southern Pacific pen- 
sioned forty-seven veterans of its service — 
laborers, mechanics, conductors, and agents 
— and at the top of the list was Ah Hop. a 
roundhouse laborer with a record of forty- 
nine years six months of duty. Only two of 
the pensioners had as little as twenty years 
service to their credit. That's the kind of 
thing that ruins the honest profession of 
walking delegate at $10 a day and nothing 
to do but make trouble. 



The Commonwealth Club of San Fran- 
cisco announces its interest in the promotion 
of a State policy to enlarge the authority of 
the State Water Commission. Isn't this a 
poor time to enlarge the authorities of any 
commission except one designed to lop off. 



January 8, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



Campaign of Economy 

THE CAMPAIGN OF ECONOMY which 
is being waged by the railroads of the 
country is necessarily a difficult one 
and is beset with obstacles which at first 
glance are insurmountable, but the roads are 
digging into each of the obstacles and bid 
fair to eliminate a surprising number of 
them. They have already accomplished the 
feat of showing an average movement on 
every freight car in the United States of 
thirty miles in one day. and through a 
more intensive use of existing facilities will 
probably cut down operating expenses a 
great deal more. Reductions in expense are 
very much in order and it is the general aim 
of every president in the country to operate 
his railroad for less than his present expense 
sheet shows. 

One of the heaviest expense items which 
must be reduced if the roads are to show 6 
per cent earned on their aggregate value as 
prescribed in the Transportation act is the 
cost of the fuel they are using. The roads 
are failing at the rate of $25,000,000 to 
$30,000,000 a month to earn their estimated 
net return. 

A very large part if not most of this 
failure is due to the fact that fuel is costing 
them much more than was estimated at the 
time the statistics on which they based their 
application for advances in rates were made 
up. Fuel prices already are declining, but 
there is need for much greater efforts to 
economize in the use of fuel by better super- 
vision and by the more extensive use of fuel- 
saving devices. There must be secured a 
greater increase in the efficiency of labor. 
This also must be obtained by better super- 
vision and by the more extensive use of 
labor-saving devices and machinery in all 
departments. 

One of the most important things that 
should be done is to keep up the heavy load- 
ing of cars. This can be done only if the 
co-operation of shippers can be secured. It 
can be secured if shippers can be made to 
understand what heavy loading means to 
them in the cost of transportation. The 
progress which has been made and the re- 
sults which have been obtained in increasing 
the average loading of cars within recent 
years are remarkable. In the year 1915 the 
average number of tons hauled per train was 
474[/2. while in September. 1920. it was 
767, an increase of 61 per cent. This in- 
crease in tons per train was mainly due to 
the increase in the number of tons per car. 



subordinates in his New Year message that 
his corporation has always been noted for 
paying good wages, and the equivalent re- 
turn in good work in this year of peace is 



to be expected. The president is very polite 
about it, but his reminder has the ring of 
earnestness. Mr. Sproule is always earnest 
and fair. 



MORE GINGER IN 19Z1 

President William Sproule of the Southern 
Pacific, who is an executive with the full 
courage of his convictions, reminds his 



COMBINED STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

HEAD OFFICE AND BRANCHES 

BANK OF ITALY 



SAVINGS 



COMMERCIAL 

HEAD OFFICE, SAN FRANCISCO 



TRUST 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 
December 30, 1920 

RESOURCES 

First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate $40,555,851.91 

Other Loans and Discounts 54,571,764.30 $ 95,127,616.21 



United Slates Bonds and Certificates of Indebtedness $16,293,881.00 

Stale, County and Municipal Bonds 11,761,983.72 

Other Bonds _ 8,81 3,582.47 

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank 330,000.00 



TOTAL U. S. BONDS AND OTHER SECURITIES 

Due from Federal Reserve Bank $ 6,506.874.33 

Cash and Due from Other Banks 11.133,820.04 



$ 37,199.447.19 



TOTAL CASH AND DUE FROM BANKS $ 17.640.694.37 

Banking Premises. Furniture. Fixtures and Safe Deposit Vaults $ 5,050.335.99 



Other Real Estate Owned 

Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit and Acceptances 

Interest Earned but not Collected 

Employes* Pension Fund (Carried on Books at) 

Other Resources 



300.853.71 
978.927.86 
846.154.56 
1.00 
320.654.19 



Total Resources $157,464,685.08 

LIABILITIES 

DEPOSITS $140,993,545.37 

♦Capital Paid in $9,000,000.00 

Surplus 2.125.000.00 

tUndivided Profits 1.788.240.24 



TOTAL CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS 

Dividends Unpaid 

Discount Collected, but not Earned 

Reserved for Taxes and Interest Accrued 

Letters of Credit. Acceptances and Time Drafts 

Federal Reserve Bank (United Stales Obligations) 



12.913.240.24 
541.617.71 
132.863.67 
1 54,490.23 
978.927.86 
1.750.000.00 



Total Uabilit.es _ $157,464,685.06 

All charge-offs. expenses and interest payable 'o end of half-year have been deducted in above 
statement. 

A. P. Giannim and W. R. Williams, being separately duly sworn each for himself, says that 
said A. P. Ciannim is President and that said W. R. Williams is Cashier of the Bank of Italy, 
the corporation above mentioned, and that eveiy statement contained herein is true of his own 
knowledge and beliei. 

A. P. GIANNINI. 
W. R. WILLIAMS. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this Khh day of December. 1920. 

THOMAS S. BURNES. Notary Public. 

'Authorized capital $10,000,000.00 will be fully paid up July I. 1921. 

fA special dividend of $900,000.00 was paid July 14. 1920. by the bank for account of its 
stockholders to the Stockholders Auxiliary Corporation (capital slock owned by the stockholders of 
the Bank of ll.lv) 

THE STORY OF OUR GROWTH 

At Shown P_v a Comparative Statement of Our Resources 
Decmber. 1904 $285,436 97 



December. 1908 . 

December, 1912 
December, 1916 

December, 1919 

December, 1920 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS, 221,788 
Sarins* Deposits nude on or before January 10, 1921, will can interest from 

January 1, 1921. 



$2,574,004.90 

$11,228,814.56 
. $39,805,995.24 

$137,900,700.30 

$157,464,865.08 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8. 1921 




ociot 




-•Sa- 



A CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCK 

The members of the Duncan family of 
San Francisco for three generations have 
distinguished themselves as persons who are 
not to hide their light under a bushel and be 
deprived of newspaper celebrity. Duncan, 
the elder, was one of our noted pioneer 
bankers, whose methods were so progressive 
that his bank got into financial difficulties in 
a crisis. But he managed to reinstate him- 
self in business and left quite an estate. The 
classic tastes of another generation of Dun- 
cans has given San Francisco a fair share 
of proxy advertising and now still another 
generation has been furnishing some news- 
paper reading for gay Paree. 

Menalkas, the fifteen-year-old son of Ray- 
mond Duncan, the apostle of Greek culture, 
has got into the cable news from Europe by 
disappearing temporarily when on his way 
to the delicatessen, on a family errand. 
Many times San Francisco has seen the 
sportive winds on Market street toying with 
the spindles of Raymond Duncan. The 
young Menalkas, like his dad, wears his hair 
to his shoulders, and his arms and legs bare, 
his full figure being encased in a flowing 
Greek costume chastely decorated. 

Alarmed by the delay of Menalkas on his 
family errand, the elder Duncan rushed from 
his domicile in the Rue Bonaparte, where the 
colony of Grecian esthetes holds forth and 
informed the Paris police. 

It was a wise forethought of Father Ray- 
mond, for the while the police were flying 
around the block after the Hellenic, "Little 
Jimmy" the cable offices were set to work on 
the important news and two continents next 
morning learned that the Duncan family of 
San Francisco and Paris still wears abbre- 
viated tunics and are doing their esthetic 
stunt at the old stand. 



Mardi Gras Plans 

— Plans for the Mardi Gras ball to be 
held on February 8 at the Civic Auditorium 
are now in progress. The first meeting of 
the board of directors of the Children's Hos- 
pital was held on Monday at the Hotel St. 
Francis, and Mrs. Augustus Taylor, who is 
president of the auxiliary, appointed the 
various committees. 

Mrs. Latham McMullin was made chair- 
man of the entertainment committee, and 
will be assisted by Mrs. Andrew Welch and 
Mrs. Walter Martin. Mrs. Norris Davis will 
have charge of the supper, and Mrs. Samuel 
Boardman is at the head of the music com- 



mittee. Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker has 
been appointed head of the concessions, and 
Mrs. George T. Cameron will take charge of 
the publicity. The sale and distribution of 
tickets is in the hands of Mrs. Henry Kier- 
sted, and boxes may be obtained from Mrs. 
Harry Horsley Scott, who is at the head of 
the box-sale committee. Mrs. Horace L. Hill 
will have charge of the prizes, and Mis. 
Julian 1 home has been chosen head of the 
floor committee. 

The queen will be chosen this year by 
popular vote, the ballots for which will be 
sold for the benefit of the Children's 
Hospital. 



— Mr. and Mrs. John H. Rosseter and Mr. 
and Mrs. R. D. Adams gave a large affair 
on New Year's Eve for about fifty of their 
friends. It was a dinner dance held in the 
ballroom of the Adams apartments on Hyde 
street. Some of the guests were: Messrs. 
and Mesdames Burke Smith, George Ro- 
manofsky, Harold Mann, Harry McCormick. 
Charles Fay, E. C. O'Day, J. B. Coleman, 
William I. Sesnon, Wellington Gregg, Axel 
Johnson (Sweden) ; Dr. and Mrs. Alanson 
Weeks. 



— A luncheon was given Tuesday for 
Admiral Sir Lewis Bayley of the British navy 
by the only three naval officers here who 
served under him during the war. They are 
Commander William Glassford, Commander 
William H. Lee and Commander kobert C. 
Giffen. The luncheon took place at the 
Bohemian Club, and among others there 
were Mr. Haig Patigan, president of the 
club; Captain Henry B. Price, Mr. Harry 
Francis, Captain George W- Bauer, U. S. N„ 
and Commander John McGee, U. S. N. R. 

Mr. John Rosseter gave a dinner Monday 
night for the British admiral. It was a stag 
dinner and took place on the Pacific Mail 
steamer Ecuador. 



— Miss Laura Miller and the Misses Bar- 
bara and Katherine Sesnon are the debu- 
tantes for whom Mrs. Theodore Rethers, Jr., 
gave a tea Tuesday. Receiving with them 
were Miss Margaret Buckbee, Miss Kather- 
ine Bentley, Miss Elizabeth Watt, Miss 
Janice Ewer, Miss Jessie Knowles, Miss 
Barbara Willett, Miss Katherine Stoney and 
Miss Helen Brack. 

Also at the tea were Mrs. Paul Fagan, 
Miss Geraldine Grace, Miss Barbara Kimble, 
Miss Virginia Smith, Miss Vere de Vere 
Adams, Miss Claire Knight, Miss Elizabeth 



Bliss, Miss Elizabeth Magee, Miss Margaret 
Webster, Miss Dorothy Cawston, Mrs. Frank 
Moller, Mrs. W. C. B. de Fremery, Miss 
Frances Lent, Miss Anette Rolph, Mrs. 
Blair Brooks, Mrs. Ream Black, Miss Jane 
Howard, Miss Geraldine King, Miss Kather- 
ine Mackall, Miss Nadine St. Germain, Miss 
Audrey Willett and Miss Mary Kennedy. 



— Admiral Alexander Halstead gave a 
luncheon Wednesday at the Pacific Union 
Club for Admiral Bayley, and in the even- 
ing he and his niece. Miss Violet Vaysey left 
for San Diego. They are the guests of Cap- 
tain and Mrs. Henry B. Price at Yerba 
Buena. 

— Miss Frances Lent was the principal 
guest at a luncheon which her sister, Mrs. 
Paul Fagan, gave Tuesday at the Woman's 
Athletic Club. Miss Lent will not make a 
formal debut this winter, but is taking part 
in all the affairs of the debutante set. Mr. 
and Mrs. Andrew Welch gave a large dance 
for her on Friday evening and Mrs. Bertha 
Welch will give a dinner for her grand- 
daughter before the dance. 

— Mrs. Mark Gerstle gave a luncheon last 
Friday at her Washington street residence 
for a dozen guests. Among them were Mrs. 
Herbert Moffitt. Mrs. Frank Griffin. Miss 
Celia O'Connor, Mrs. Norris Davis, and Mrs. 
John Rothschild. 

— Mrs. Talbot Walker gave a party re- 
cently at her home in Montecito for her 
little sons, James and Talbot Walker. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Oliver Tobin gave 
a large dance on New Year's Eve at the De 
Young house in California street. Friends 
from town and Burlingame were invited. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Walter Martin gave a 
large luncheon on Saturday at the Burlin- 
game and entertained friends from town and 
down the peninsula. 



Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



Specialists — 

Is it not reasonable to sup- 
pose that the merchant who 
is concerned with nothing but 
women's apparel is better 
able to meet the needs of the 
public in his special line? 
Willard's are Specialists in 
Women's Apparel. 

Willard's 

Geary Street 

Between Grant and Stockton 



January 8, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



— Mrs. Chas. Norris gave a luncheon Mon- 
day at the Fairmont for Miss Miller. 

— Colonel and Mrs. Sydney Cloman gave 
a luncheon on Sunday at their home in Bur- 
lingame to celebrate the birthday of Mr. 
Rudolph Spreckels. Luncheon was served 
out of doors. 

— Commander and Mrs. Kirby Crittenden 
will give a dinner next Tuesday evening for 
Admiral Alexander Halstead. It will take 
place at the Fay home in Grove street, where 
Commander and Mrs. Crittenden are spend- 
ing the winter. 



— The marriage of Mrs. Ethel Pippy Faris 
and Mr. George Dixon Adams took place a 
few days ago in Sacramento. The bride is 
the daughter of the late Colonel J. A. Pippy 
of San Mateo and is the widow of the late 
Dr. Clifton Faris. Mr. Adams is a grain 
dealer of Woodland. 

— Congratulations are being sent to Dr. 
and Mrs. William Lyle of New York on the 
birth of a son. Mrs. Lyle was Miss Leon- 
tine de Sabla of San Mateo until her mar- 
riage two years ago to the well known 
physician. Mrs. Lyle has made two or three 
visits to her former home since her mar- 
riage. 



— Many of Mrs. Eleanor Martin's friends 
called on her Saturday afternoon to wish her 
a happy New Year. She has followed the 
custom for years of receiving her friends on 
the first day of the year. Assisting her in 
receiving were Mrs. J. Downey Harvey, Mrs. 
Richard Derby, Miss Maye Colburn, Miss 
Pauline Howard and Mrs. Frank Helm. 

— Mrs. Jessie McNab Kerrigan with her 
sister. Miss Christine McNab, took their de- 
parture Tuesday for the East coast, to sail 
next month for Europe, where they will 
travel in France and Italy for an indefinite 
time. The Kerrigan children are in the care 
of Miss Sue McNab at her home on Broad- 
way. 

— Mrs. William Babcock has returned to 
New York from Europe and is at the Hotel 
St. Regis. She has been visiting her sister 
in London and has also been to Paris. Mrs. 
Babcock has been away from California for 
nearly a year and spent most of last winter 
with her relatives. Colonel and Mrs. Henry 
May, in Washington. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hudnut, who 
were at the Fairmont for several weeks after 
their arrival from New York, have taken 
possession of their new apartment in Cali- 
fornia street. They will be there until they 
leave for New York and Europe in the early 
spring. 

— Mr. Joseph D. Grant has gone to New 
York and will remain there until Mrs. Grant 
and Miss Josephine Grant return from 
Europe. He was with them abroad until 
last month when he returned to his home 
here for a short stay. 



— Miss Marion Zeile, who went to Hono- 
lulu with Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dillingham 
and is visiting them there will return to her 
apartments at the Fairmont on January I 7. 

— Among the interesting visitors to San 
Francisco are Mr. and Mrs. Axel Johnson of 
Stockholm, who are at the Fairmont with 
two secretaries and a retinue of servants. Mr. 
Johnson is consul-general of Sweden to 
Siam. 

— Mrs. William S. Porter has given up 
her trip to the Orient and will leave in a 
fortnight for Europe. She will go directly 
to Italy to pass the remainder of the winter. 
Mrs. Porter and Mrs. George Fairchild had 
planned to sail for Japan this month, but 
Mrs. Fairchild is delayed in New York on 
account of the illness of her daughter and 
will not leave there for another month. 

— Miss Mary Ashe Miller spent the week- 
end here with Mr. and Mrs. James Potter 
Langhorne. She returned to Hollywood, 
where she has an apartment for the winter. 



— One of the most attractive children's 
parties ever given in San Francisco was that 
at which little Miss Jean Wingfield and 
George Wingfield, Jr., were hosts at the 
Fairmont. Mrs. George Wingfield and her 
daughter and son received the guests in the 
Empire room, which presented a brilliant 
Christmas scene. There was a huge, gor- 
geously trimmed Christmas tree and a large 
table where the children sat for refresh- 
ments. 



— Viscountess Rothermere was the prin- 
cipal guest at a dinner which Commodore 
and Mrs. James H. Bull gave recently in the 
Rose room at the Palace. The other guests 



were Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong Taylor, Com- 
mander and Mrs. Wallace Bertholf, Captain 
Longbourne of Highmead, Guilford, Eng- 
land, Miss Ireland of Edenburgh, who is 
traveling with Lady Rothermere; Admiral 
Alexander Halstead, General George Barnett 
and Mr. Wilfred Bull. The viscountess and 
Miss Ireland are enthusiastic horse-back 
riders and during their stay at the Fairmont 
are riding every day in the park and on the 
beach. In England at her estate, Cran- 
brook, in Hemsted, Lady Rothermere has a 
fine stable, and also at "La Dragonniere," 
the Rothermere place at Cap Martin. 

— The names of two California families 
of prominence are linked with the announce- 
ment of the engagement of Miss Virginia 
Younger and Gaston Ashe. The late Dr. 
William J. Younger, grandfather of the en- 
gaged girl, lived in Paris for many years 
and, together with Mrs. Younger, was one of 
the leaders of the American colony in that 
city. Miss Younger bears the name of her 
grandmother, who is living in San Francisco 
at present. The bride-to-be is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Younger. She is 
a niece of Baroness Nugent, Mrs. Burns Mc- 
Donald and Miss Maude Younger. The 
groom-elect is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Francis Davis. On his mother's side he is a 
descendant of Don Juan Bolado. He is at 
present living on the Bolado rancho at Hol- 
lister. This property is part of the original 
grant given to the distinguished Spaniard. 
Young Ashe was overseas during the war. 
His mother lives in Santa Cruz. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Van Sicklen 
and Miss Hilda Van Sicklin have taken 
apartments at the Fairmount for the winter. 



PRE INVENTORY 



NOW ON 



SALE 



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Men's Furnishing Goods 
at 20 to 50 per cent off 

HASTINGS CLOTHING COMPANY J 

POST STREET AT KEARNY 
UtQ t f • * >••• »»»♦♦««»»» QOOOOO OO OOO M OOOOO f ••»•>»»♦ 




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Use Murine Eye Remedy 

No Dressing Table Complete Without 
_.. ve Murine As An Eye Tonic liquid 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8. 1921 



Del Monte's Grand Trophy 



IT IS GREATLY to the credit of the Del 
Monte management, that it is doing so 

much to make the beautiful resort by the 
shores of Monterey Bay, such an attraction 
to the most desirable class of visitors, from 
all parts of the world. To people in 
northern California, Del Monte has always 
been synonymous with pre-eminence in the - 
lines of delightful hotel entertainment and 
outdoor recreation. 

On the front .page of the News Letter this 
week is a fine engraving of the unique and 
beautiful bronze trophy which is being set 
up by the Del Monte Club. It will be played 
for during the course of the annual tourna- 
ment from March 19 to April 3. The action 
of the two figures represented in the trophy 
is worthy of the highest praise for the 
sculptor, Miss Lucille Schoenfeld, by whom 
the bronze has been modeled. 

The trophy represents two polo players 
riding at full speed, and Miss Shoenfeld has 
caught their spirited pose at the precise mo- 
ment when it is most picturesque and 
exciting, lhe talented sculptor will find it 
no easy task to excel in any artistic respect 
such an admirable creation. 

This fine bronze will remain a permanent 
trophy at Del Monte, with the names of the 
winning teams each year engraved upon it. 
Replicas of the trophy will be presented to 
the individual members of the winning team. 
It is needless to say that the players who 
shall win replicas of such an appropriate 
work of art will esteem themselves fortunate 
and highly honored. lhe usual form of 
polo .prize has been some cup, which, how- 
ever beautiful in design, is rather hackneyed, 
the idea of a splendid bronze statue, repre- 
sentative of a tense and typical moment in 
the great game of esquestrian skill is worthy 
of the highest approval, especially when ma- 
terialized with such genius as the selected 
sculptor has shown, llie originator of the 
idea is S. F. B. Morse, delegate of the Del 
Monte Folo Club. 

In connection with the offering of this fine 
polo trophy, it may be stated that everything 
is being put in readiness at Del Monte for 
the biggest polo season ever enjoyed in 
California. lire season will officially be 
ushered in on January 29 with an Invita- 
tional Tournament. Flay will start, how- 
ever, about the middle of January and will 
continue until the latter part of April. The 
annual tournament at Del Monte comes on 
March 19 to April 3. 

The Honolulu polo club will ship 20 to 30 
ponies on January 8 to Del Monte and the 
Island players will follow in the latter part 
of February. It is also expected that Mexico, 
Canada and the East will be represented 



with teams in the tournaments at Del Monte. 

An outstanding feature of the California 
polo season this year will be the appearance 
of army teams on the field. The war depart- 
ment is making an effort to interest officers 
and enlisted men in the sport and the Mon- 
terey Presidio has already organized a team 
to get into the events on the Del Monte 
fields. 

The bronze work on this beautiful trophy 
is being wrought by Shreve & Company, 
which is a guarantee that the completed 
work will lose none of the spirit of the 
clever sculptor's sketch. 



DEL MONTE CHAMPIONSHIPS 

The year 1920 will go down in history as 
the greatest ever enjoyed in sports at Del 
Monte. For many years the State cham- 
pionships have been decided on the Del 
Monte golf course and in former years the 
Pacific Coast, as well as the State champions 
were crowned on the tennis courts there. 
During the past year the scope of competi- 
tion was extended to take in trap shooting, 
swimming, polo and the like. 

Golf naturally took the lead in attracting 
the greatest interest. Something like 18,000 
more games of golf were played during 1 920 
than the previous twelve months. Increased 
interest was displayed in practically all lines 
of out of door pastime. 

A feature of the year was the activity of 
social and business organizations in decid- 
ing their golf championships and other 
events at Del Monte. 

No less than thirty-three champions were 
proclaimed during the year. Their organi- 
zations represented many States in America. 



JANUARY JAZZ AT TECHAU TAVERN 

The New Year at Techau Tavern opens 
with an entire change of musical entertain- 
ment, including several new and novel 
numbers by the 1921 Revue, an octette of 
pretty girls gowned in the last word in color 
and style. The big attraction is, of course, 
the Three White Kuhns, the originators ol 
instrumental novelties, starring in their own 
creations, "Oh, What a Dance," and other 
numbers. Direct from the Orpheum and 
Pantages circuit they are attracting music 
lovers to the Techau Tavern daily. One of 
the new attractions in Lucky Dances is the 



distribution of large boxes of Miss Saylor's 
chocolates, the unusual candy, which to- 
gether with boxes of Murad cigarettes form 
especial attractions for after theatre dancers. 



Tetrazzini to Return 

Luisa Tetrazzini, who is making the 
greatest tour of her career under the man- 
agement of W. H. Leahy, will visit San 
Francisco again in the spring, and will give 
a recital in the Civic Auditorium on Easter 
Sunday afternoon, March 27, under the 
local management of Frank W. Healy. 



Maude — How do you happen lo be engaged to 
Iwo men at once? 

Alice — Why, I proposed to Jaclt last night and 
he accepted me, and now Tom, who refused me last 
week, writes that he has reconsidered in my favor. — 
Judge. 



PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 
- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 



DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist ' 

908 Market Street, at Powell 

San Francisco 

Dept. N. L. Established 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



Established 25 Years. 



Kearny 2842 



Hair Priced Lower 

Hair Nets,doz. - - $1.00 
Hair Switches - $5.95 

Values up to $15.00 

TRANSFORMATIONS 



First Quality 



Now 



$9.95 



You can't afford to have your hair look 
badly. Prices like these appeal lo all ladies. 



Cosgrove's Hair Store 



360 Geary Street 



San Francisco. 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



January 8. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



monioijlo 




At this time of year many motor car 
owners are planning to build garages and a 
few words of advice may save some dol- 
lars and disappointment later on. The aver- 
age car owner should get it firmly in mind 
that the garage is essentially an investment, 
and not a mere shelter for the vehicle, in 
which neither looks nor convenience count 
for anything. 

This view of the matter has been too 
prevalent in the past and it is time that we 
get rid of it. 

In planning the garage, the car owner 
should make up his mind to have plenty of 
room. This will cost a little more in the 
first place but it will pay for itself times 
over as the years go on. There should be 
space enough to allow for a work bench, in 
addition to the car. In fact, the owner will 
do well to consider the possibility of making 
the building large enough to house an extra 
car, though he may have but one at a time. 
We never know when we may acquire a 
second car, and then also most week-ending 
is done by car nowadays and provision 
ought to be at hand for the guest's car, as 
well as the guest himself. 

Plenty of space in the garage actually 
pays dividends in money saved because if 
the building is constricted the owner will find 
it impossible, or at any rate, inconvenient, 
to do many jobs about the car that would 
otherwise be attended to at home — the net 
result, swollen repair bills. 

If it is at all possible, the garage should 
have a water system. The motor car is a 
vehicle of mud as well as of stone roads, and 
washing operations are almost a daily oc- 
currence during the active running seasons. 
Many garage owners prefer to have the 
water placed just outside the garage, believ- 
ing that this saves puddles and general 
messiness inside the building. There is 
much to recommend this view. On the other 
hand, if the floor is properly sloped and an 
adequate drain is installed, there will not be 
a great deal of trouble with water in the 
garage. At any rate, the cleaning fluid 
should be close at hand, so there is no temp- 
tation to neglect using it. 

The next item for serious consideration is 
lighting. If there is any place where light 
is essential, it is in the garage. It may be 
well to .devote a few words to the drainage 
of the garage. This must be adequate to 
carry off all oil and gasoline drippings de- 



si 



posited on the floor and water if this is used 
in the building. The floor of the garage 
should slope to the drain, generally located 
in the center of the floor. 

* * * 
Watch Brake Rods 

Every month or so the motorist should 
look over the brake rods and linkages, clean- 
ing off all the accumulated road dirt and 
rust so that they will act as freely and ef- 
ficiently as possible. In the cleansing pro- 
cess, a half-and-half solution of kerosene 
and lubricating oil works wonders. You will 
be surprised how much easier and more 
efficiently the brakes act if the operating 
mechanism gets this attention at not too in- 
frequent intervals. 

Emergency Patch 

Ordinary tire tape may be used to patch 
inner tubes by running it twice around the 
tube and overlapping the ends so as to cover 
the leak. Surgeon's plaster may be used in 
the same way in an emergency. 

* * * 
Packing Gasoline Pump 

A satisfactory material for packing the 
stuffing box of the gasoline pump is hemp- 
string and soap. Gasoline will dissolve prac- 
tically any kind of oil used as a lubricant, 
but it has no effect on soap, so that this 



15 

material may be used in place of grease as 
a lubricant, or in place of red lead in mak- 
ing screw joints tight. 

* * * 

For Clear Windshield 

Here is a simple recipe I have used for 
keeping moisture from obscuring the wind- 
shield: Rub the glass all over with strong 
soap suds made from automobile soap and 
permit the suds to dry. This prevents the 
formation of the small globules that hinder 
clear vision through the glass in rain or 
mist. 

¥ * * 

Reports from 22 Moon dealers through- 
out the northern half of the State indicate 
a marked resumption of buying, declares J. 
C. Galeoto of the Moon Automobile Com- 
pany, Moon distributors for this territory. 
Galeoto has just returned to San Francisco 
from a tour of the State and is enthusiastic 
about conditions generally. 

Plans for the coming Oakland Auto- Show, 
next of the California salons, are assuming 
definite shape as they days pass. 

Tire Companies Reducing 

Practically all rubber industries in Akron 
for the past several months have reduced 
wage scales by reducing factory operating 
forces and then re-employing men at a 
lower scale. 

The Firestone factories are working on a 
basis of twenty-five hours a week or five 
hours a day and five days a week. The re- 
duction in operating schedules is in addition 
lo the heavy reduction of factory operating 
forces during the past several weeks. 

In announcing this reduction for salaried 
employes the Firestone Tire and Rubber 
Company has given full and careful consid- 



CAPITAL $2,000,000.00 

EARTHQUAKE - FIRE - AUTOMOBILE 

PATRONIZING AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS 
IS PRACTICAL PATRIOTISM 

The North River Insurance Co. 



Incorporated 1822 



Pacific Department 

266 Bush St., S. F. 



Harold Junker 

Manager 



THE HOME 

INSURANCI COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Co, in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 

TOURISTS" BAGGAGE INSURANCE 

REASONABLE RATES 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8. 1921 



eration to every phase of the present eco- 
nomic situation. Conditions have necessi- 
tated a retrenchment in every line of pro- 
duction. Salaries came last but could not 
be excepted. It is only fair in making this 
announcement that attention should be 
called to the fact that at the same time the 
company also reduced the returns on the 
money invested in the business, in other 
words, the dividend rate, from $2 to $1.50 
per share per quarter. 



THEIR BRIEF HOUR OVER 

Among the rotables who died in 1920 
were: Dr. Cyrus Townsend, 59, author. 
New York; Carranza, 60, President of 
Mexico; F. H. Chickering, piano manufac- 
turer, Chicago; Wm. Cotnwallis West, 63, 
England; Rear Admiral Day, 72, France; 
Reginald DeKoven, 59, composer. New 
York; Duke De Morny, Paris; Gaby Deslys, 
dancer, Paris; Lord Sholto Douglas, Ninth 
Marquis of Queensbury, South Africa; Duke 
Ludwig of Bavaria, 89, Switzerland; former 
Empress Eugenia of France, 94, Madrid; 
Prince Joachim, 30, German Kaiser's 
youngest son, Potsdam; Wm. Dean Howells, 
83, author, New York; Rear Admiral 
Kempf, 79, Santa Barbara; Mrs. Ogden 
Mills, 65, Paris; Harry Moffitt, 47, chief U. 
S. secret service, San Francisco; Thomas 
Morris, 126, oldest living man, Grand 
Rapids, Neb.; Levi P. Morton, 96, ex-gov- 
ernor of New York; Col. Sam Parker of 
Hawaii, San Francisco; Robert E. Perry, 
discoverer of North Pole, Washington, D. 
C. ; Maude Powell, 52, violinist, New York; 
Mme. Rejane, 63, Paris; E. P. Ripley, head 
Santa Fe Railroad, Santa Barbara, Calif. ; 
Jacob H. Schiff, 73, banker, New York; 
E. E. Searles, 79, philanthropist, Massachu- 
setts; Olive Thomas, movie star, Paris; W. 
K. Vanderbilt, 71, capitalist, Paris; Grand 
Duchess Vladimir, 66, aunt of Emperor 
Nicholas, Paris; I. W. Hellman, senior San 
Francisco banker; Rafael Weill, famous San 
Francisco philanthropist, Paris. 



LEOPOLD MICHELS' WILL 

The will of the late Leopold Michels, ad- 
mitted to probate by Superior Judge Frank 
H. Dunne, provides for a number of personal 
bequests to the amount of $18,750, and 
legacies to various San Francisco charities, 
including the Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum 
and Home Society, the Protestant Orphan 
Asylum Society, the Roman Catholic Orphan 
Asylum, the Nursery for Homeless Children 
and the Eureka Benevolent Society. 

The bulk of the estate, worth over $500,- 
000, goes to Mrs. Carrie Michels for her use 
during her lifetime. 



CRISIS IN ENGLAND'S TEXTILES 

England's textile trades are now passing 
through the greatest crisis they have experi- 
enced since our Civil War when the supply 
of cotton was cut off by the Federal block- 



ade, according to Leonard B. Gary, trade 
commissioner of the Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce of the Department of 
Labor. Mr. Gary, whose station is in Lon- 
don, is in New York on a brief furlough, 
after which he will return to his post. 

As reported by Mr. Gary, the stocks of 
cottons on hand are immense, with the de- 
mand inversely small. 



IMPORTANT CHANGE 

W. L. Hughson Will Remove His Large 

Business to Van Ness Avenue and 

Market Street 

CONSIDERING the importance of the 
building operations at Van Ness ave- 
nue and Market street, very little atten- 
tion has been paid to it by any of the news- 
papers. The realty reporters might get busy 
on the subject, for in a short time the lo- 
cality just mentioned will be the center of 
the motor truck business. Shrewd realtors 
believe the locality will eventually pull a 
very important part of the auto trade. 

the southeast corner of Van Ness avenue 
and Market street will soon be occupied by 
that highly progressive automobile man. 
William L. Hughson, whose large establish- 
ment is now located at Van Ness avenue and 
Geary street. 

That such an important firm should be- 
come established at Market street and Van 
Ness is exceedingly significant. The motor 
truck business would be firmly established in 
that section already, were it not that the 
property owners of the neighboring blocks 
are all asleep to their opportunities. Some 
of the owners are broke, some are so rich 
they give no attention to their city property, 
and some are the heirs of large estates and 
desire only to convert their holdings into 
cash. 

lhe late P. J. Gartland, a very successful 
real estate operator, bought from the Miller 
and Lux estate the fine corner where W. L. 
Hughson is about to move his extensive 
business. Mr. Gartland proceeded to erect 
a fine building on the comer, and it was an- 
nounced that he had leased it to the Chev- 
rolet Motor Company. For some reason the 
arrangement fell through, after the building 
was started. Mr. Gartland's serious illness 
at the time delayed the construction of 'the 
building and his death followed soon after, 
more delay was unavoidable. The building 
is now being carried on with celerity and 
the new occupant's signs in front of it in- 
form the public that it will be the Ford 
Corner, for sales and service. 

The public, knowing Mr. Hughson's record 
as a hustling and reliable business man, re- 
alizes that things will soon begin to hum 
around the corner of Market and Van Ness. 
The location he has chosen is regarded by 
progressive real estate men as ideal. They 
praise Mr. Hughson's excellent judgment and 
predict a rush of motor dealers to imitate 
him. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

BANK OF ITALY 

Southeast Corner Montgomery and Clay Streets. 

Market Street Branch, Junction. Market, Turk ami 

Mason Streets. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1920, a 

dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 

per cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 

on and after January 3, 1921. Dividends not called 

for are added to and bear the same rate of interest 

as the principal from January 1, 1921. Deposits made 

on or before January 10, 1921, will earn interest from 

January 1, 1921. 

A. P. GIANNINI, President. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK 

783 Market Street, Near Fourth. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1920, a 

dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) per 

cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable on 

and after January 3, 1921. Dividends not called for 

are added to and bear the same rate of interest as 

the principal from January 1, 1921. Deposits made on 

or before January 10, 1921, will earn interest from 

January 1, 1921. 

H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK 

316 Montgomery Street. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1920, a 

dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 

per cent per annum on savings deposits, payable on 

and after January 3, 1921; dividends not called for 

arc added and bear the same rate of interest as 

the principal from January 1, 1921; deposits made on 

or before January 10, 1921, will earn interest from 

January 1, 1921. 

EDWARD D. OAKLEY, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

THE H1BERN1A SAVINGS AND LOAN 

SOCIETY 

Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Streets. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1920, a 

dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 

per cent per annum on all deposits, payable on and 

after Monday, January 3, 1921. Dividends not 

drawn will be added to depositors' accounts, become 

a part thereof, and will earn dividends from January 

1, 1921. Deposits made on or before January 10, 

1921, will draw interest from January 1, 1921. 

R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

ITALIAN-AMERICAN BASK 

Southeast Corner Montgomery and Sacramento 

Streets. (North Beach Branch, Columbia 

Avenue and Broadway) 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1920, a 

dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 

per cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 

on and after January 3, 1921. Dividends not called 

for will be added to the principal and bear the same 

rate of interest from January 1, 1921. Deposits 

made on or before January 10, 1921, will earn 

interest from January 1, 1921. 

A. SBARBORO, President. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY 

Montgomery and Post Streets. (Branch, 706 Market 

Street, opposite Third) 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1920. a 

dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 

per cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 

on and after January 3, 1921. Dividends not called 

for are added to the deposit account and earn 

dividend from January 1, 1921. Deposits made on 

or before January 10, 1921, will earn interest from 

January 1, 1921. 

JAMES K. MOFFITT, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

TRENCH-AMERICAN BANK OF SAVINGS 

(Savings Department) 108 Sutter Street. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1920, a 

dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 

per cent per annum on all deposits, payable on and 

after January 3, 1921. Dividends not called for arc 

added to and bear the same rate of interest as the 

principal from January 1, 1921. Deposits made on 

or before January 10, 1921, will earn interest from 

lanuary 1, 1921. 

LEON BOCQUERAZ, President. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Junction of Market Street, Grant Avenue and 

O'Farrell Street. 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1920) 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 
on and after Monday, January 3, 1021. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same rate of 
interest as the principal from January 1, l c '2l 
Money deposited on or before January 10, 1921, will 
earn interest from January 1, 1921. 

F. J. BRICKWEDEL, Cashier. 






January 8. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 




PLvDASURE/'S "WAND 



"Obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




The Symphony Orchestra 

Sunday afternoon in the Curran Theatre, 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
under the direction of Alfred Hertz will offer 
another of its "Popular" concerts, the pro- 
gram for which is made up mostly of fa- 
miliar light classics. The principal number 
will be Schubert's "Unfinished" symphony 
in B Minor and Wagner's overture to "The 
Mastersingers." 

At the next pair of symphony concerts, to 
be given next Friday and Sunday after- 
noons, San Francisco Symphony patrons 
will be given their first hearing of a Mahler 
symphony, the first symphony in D Major 
being scheduled for performance at these 

concerts. 

Orpheum New Bill 

The Lightner Sisters and Newton Alex- 
ander, surrounded by a large supporting 
company, including William Taylor, the 
Dancing McDonalds and ten vamps, will re- 
turn to the Orpheum next week with their 
new offering, a one-act musical comedy en- 
titled "Little Miss Vamp." 

Elsa Ruegger, a San Francisco idol, also 
will be welcomed next week; Howard Lang- 
ford and Ina Fredrick; Eddie Clayton and 
Frank Lennie; William Mandel and com- 
pany; Fred Whitfield and Marie Ireland; 
Margaret Stewart and William Downing, in 
a high class posing act; Jeannette Hackett 
and Harry Delmar, with their dancing com- 
pany who hold over next week, complete the 
bill. 



Alcazar Attractions 

"Civilian Clothes," which ran a year in 
large eastern cities, will be presented on 
Sunday, January 9. Oliver Morosco con- 
siders it as one of his greatest productions. 
The hero of the play, "Captain Sam Mc- 
Ginnis," (Dudley Ayres) a shoemaker's son, 
comes home from the war in civilian clothes 
and disturbs the family ideals of his high- 
bred Kentucky lover, who never saw him 
except in his regimentals when she was 
nursing in France. Elwyn Harvey plays the 
capricious belle, and distinctive roles fall 
to Ben Erway, Rafael Brunette Henry 
Shumer, Al Cunningham, and the other 
clever members of the company. 

On Sunday. January 16 "The Wonderful 
Thing." another New York success will be 
produced. 



Mystery Melodrama at Alcazar 

The title alone makes for excited interest. 
and the moment the curtain rises upon "For 
the Defense," the thrills begin. 



Maitland Playhouse 

Shaw's comedy, "You Never Can Tell," 
is being played by the Maitland company. 
Maitland portrays Valentine, the delightful 
dentist. His personality is always agreeable, 
but there is a sameness in his light comedy 
part that tries the patience of his admirers. 

Alice Eastman, in the part of Dorothy 
Clandon, is pretty and acceptable. Caroline 
Howard made a lovely mother. Mary Morris 
was excellent as Gloria. William, the waiter, 
which is the real part of the play, was well 
done by Thomas Miller. 



Orpheum's Holiday Bill 

Our leading vaudeville theatre gives this 
week a lavish entertainment, helping appre- 
ciably to lighten that inevitable feeling of 
depression and lassitude which follows the 
Merry Christmas season. 



MATINEE MUSICALE 

The matinee musicale to be held at the 
Hotel St. Francis next Tuesday afternoon is 
anticipated by music-loving circles. The 
noted harpist. Salzedo, with six assisting 
artists, together with Madame Povla Frijsh, 
Danish dramatic soprano, will present a de- 
lightful program, to be followed by tea 
served in the Italian room. Some of the 
patronesses are: Mesdames Sydney Cloman, 
Daniel Jackling, Frank Pinckney Helm. 
Marcus Koshland, William T. Sesnon, An- 
drew Welch, William Hinckley Taylor. 
Hunter Liggett. George Cameron. Louis C. 
Mullgardt. Prentiss Cobb Hale, Aimer 
Newhall, Uda Waldrop. Florence Porter 
Pfingst. Herbert Fleishhacker. Eleanor Mar- 
tin ; Miss Maude Fay. 



FAIRMONT DINNER DANCE 

The Fairmont Hotel dinner dance. Sat- 
urday. January 8, in the Venetian Room, 
from 7 o'clock until midnight, will be an 
affair calculated to attract the class of guests 
that value special attention. It is to such 
that the Fairmont caters and by which it has 
established its great reputation. 



AS DELMONICOE SEES IT 

Manager Fcurer of Delmonico's in New 
York, says: "The chief causes of present 
high prices in our restaurant are prohibition 
and labor. For the first there is no relief 
unless the Volstead act is drastically 
amended. As to labor, during the month of 
April alone our salary list increased from 
$16,000 to $21,000. We hope this problem 
will be solved by immigration. This, in fact, 
is the only way in which it can be solved. 



But, even if we are able to obtain labor 
from this new group, the results will not be 
felt for half a year." 



NIGHTS OF CARNIVAL 

Every Thursday night at Cafe Marquard 
is one of carnival, with a dinner extraor- 
dinary from 6 to 9:30 for $2.50. 

The Fashion Revue for 1921 with Patricia 
Allen, the Lucky Dances and the Wheel of 
Fate candy baskets all contribute to a list 
of attractions made doubly enjoyable by the 
Paramount Melodists. 

The pre-war price of the 75 cent luncheon 
for business men is indicative of the cut in 
rates at this aptly styled "Smart Place for 
Smart People." Mason and Geary streets. 



Results of an investigation of the news- 
paper reading habits of students in New 
York University, show that in the matter of 
relative interest general news led with 19.80 
per cent of the votes; editorials, 14.82 per 
cent; politics, 11.73 per cent, and next in 
order were finance, sports, foreign news, 
special articles, theatre news, advertisements, 
local news, business page, cartoons and book 
reviews. 



SAM FRANCISCO 



\n NAUD^U.Vt 



I 



J $\yfaui^&\ciut U B g 




Next Week— Starting Sunday 

Lightner Sisters & Newton Alexander 

Willintn Tiiyl'ir— Tho Pnnoinjr Mac Donalds 

and 10 Vamp* 

E.lrii— CLAYTON A LKNNIE--Frnnk 

Elsa Ruegger | Langford & Fredrick 

W M H ANDEL A CO. I WHIT Fig I.D.Ic IRELAND 



•ARTISTIC TREAT" 



TOPICS OF PAY 



INTERNATIONAL N 



ORCHFSTRA 



Hackett & Delmar 

With a Bevy "f Bpnutitul Sale* Girls , 

Matinees— C'-c to il.OO Evenlncs— 2:-c to $l.. r O 

MATINEE DAILY— Phone Ponitla» 70 

Scalp, r- Tlekett Noi Honored 

ALCAZAR 

THIS WEEK— Baffling My.lery Play 

"FOR THE DEFENSE" 
WEEK COM. NEXT SUN. MAT.. JAN. 9 

Oliver Morosco's Supreme Success 
The Enormously Popular Afler-lhe-War Comedy 

"CIVILIAN CLOTHES" 

This is the Famous Spoken Drama. 

NEW ALCAZAR COMPANY 

DUDLEY AYRES— ELWYN HARVEY 

SUN. MAT. (AN. 16— Recent New York Hit 

Lillian Trimle Bradley's Ideal Romance. Blending 

Laughter. Pathos. Dramatic Thrill 

THE WONDERFUL THING" 

\. \ppealing as "Pec O' My Heart" 

Every Evening— Mats. Sun.. Thurs.. Sal. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8, 1921 



Market Street Death Traps 



pears to have profited by this condition of 
affairs. 

The situation points unerringly to the ne- 
cessity of a restoration of the protective 
policy, argues Mr. Bourne. 



WHY WASTE TIME inquiring "Who is 
to blame for the New Year's Eve 
accident on Market street, when a 
temporary sidewalk in front of a theatre ex- 
cavation, Market and Taylor streets, col- 
lapsed and precipitated many people into 
the pit?" 

Of course the Board of Works is the real 
culprit, no matter where the legal responsi- 
bility may ultimately rest. 

Because few people were dangerously 
hurt does not guarantee that we shall not 
have another and worse occurrence, as the 
city is full of death-traps in the form of 
unsafe sidewalks, that have remained so 
since the terrible fire of 1906. The exist- 
ence of such dangerous spots is also a black 
mark against the Board of Works. 

We understand, thoroughly, that allow- 
ance must be made for unlucky property 
owners, whom the great fire left in deplor- 
able circumstances. But all the owners of 
death-traps are not impoverished taxpayers. 
Some of them are millionaires, and the con- 
dition of their property is discreditable as 
well as dangerous. 

Since that temporary sidewalk at Market 
and Taylor streets collapsed and hurt people, 
the city authorities have shown tremendous 
interest in examination of the causes. All 
kinds of officials have been in evidence. 
Even a police photographer has been making 
plates of the pine boards that crumpled up. 
That is always the way. If the officials had 
exercised, before the accident, one-tenth of 
the interest since displayed, scores of people 
would not have been placed in jeopardy of 
the emergency hospital and the morgue. 
The same old rule is always followed at the 
city hall — "lock the stable when the steed 
is stolen." 

At present most of the dense crowds on 
Market street collect below Seventh; but 
one of these fine days some street spactacle 
will take thousands of sightseers above 
Ninth, and I miss my guess if the emergency 
hospitals do not have a busy afternoon. 

Along upper Market street there are 
blocks of old board sidewalks on tall trestles 
that would make a cautious cock-sparrow 
mind his step; but the thin veneer of 
asphaltum hides the pitfalls from pedestrians 
and they stride along oblivious of their peril. 
Before the inevitable catastrophe takes place 
an ordinance should be adopted by the 
Board of Supervisors compelling the police 
to rope off all dangerous sidewalks on days 
of public processions and erect signs to warn 
the heedless multitude. 

Of course an easier and more effective 
way would be to make the owners of dan- 



gerous sidewalks substitute safe footing for 
the public. Upper Market street is a dis- 
credit to our city, as most of the property 
owners will neither sell, nor lease, no matter 
what advantageous offers be made them. 
They perhaps prefer to sit down by their 
dangerous sidewalks, and wait till somebody 
comes along and gives them a fortune in 
unearned increment as a reward for their 
dog-in-the-manger policy. 



HIGHER TARIFF NEEDED 

Former United States Senator Jonathan 
Bourne of Oregon calls attention to the 
enormous imports during 1920. In ten 
months the importation of foodstuffs 
amounted to 34 per cent, or $1,602,000,000, 
and manufactured goods made up 31 per 
cent, or $1,461,000,000. For the same 
period of 1919, with imports totaling $3,- 
100,000,000. foodstuffs totaled $912,000.- 
000. and manufacturers $844,000,000. Com- 
pared with the 1919 period the ten months 
of 1920 show an increase of $1,600,000,000 
in total imports, $690,000,000 in foodstuffs, 
and $617,000,000 in manufactures. It is 
interesting, the former senator says, to note 
that the increase in total imports, the 1920 
over the 1919 period, is greater by $140,- 
000,000 than the grand total of imports for 
the ten months ended October 31, 1913, 
under the protective tariff policy. Our 
total imports for the 1913 period were 
$1,460,000,000. 

Another interesting point to note is that 
while the imports for the 1913 period paid 
$268,000,000 into the Federal treasury by 
way of customs duties, the imports for the 
1920 period more than three times as great, 
paid in customs duties not more than $20,- 
000,000 in excess of the 1913 collections, or, 
to express it in simple proportion, $1,460.- 

000.000 is to $268,000,000 as $4,700,000.- 

000 is to $288,000,000. Foodstuffs are 
nearly five times what they were before the 
war, in point of value, while imports of man- 
ufacturers have been multiplied by nearly 
two and one-half. But outside of the foreign 
producer and the importer none of us ap- 



SERVICES IN THE INTEREST OF PEACE 

It's quite true: President Wilson has been 
made the pleased and, no doubt, surprised 
recipient of the Nobel peace prize. When 
the story of the award first reached this 
country, a great many of our fellow-citizens 
thought the Norwegians were having a little 
joke at the expense of the President, and 
some very natural resentment was felt here 
at their display of bad taste. More than any 
other people, we knew that Mr. Wilson had 
done nothing to entitle him to the Nobel 
peace prize; it was this knowledge that 
aroused our anger against those who, we 
thought, had jocularly sent abroad the im- 
possible story of the award. 

And now we find that the Nobel prize has 
indeed been given to Mr. Wilson for his ex- 
traordinary services in the interest of peace! 
What did Mr. Wilson do to earn this prize? 
He kept us out of war during one political 
campaign, and then, wholly unready and un- 
prepared, plunged us into the war that he 
knew and the rest of us were quite certain 
was inevitable. Was it for this that the 
Nobel peace prize was awarded? While we 
were in the war, Mr. Wilson retained in office 
those who permitted the Government's war 
machinery to break down. Was that service 
in the interest of peace? And when the war 
was almost won, and the Allies had it in their 
power to slay the dragon that had devastated 
the universe, and thereby give us a lasting, 
world-wide peace, Mr. Wilson stepped in and 
gave us a few vain phrases and a no less 
futile armistice. The nations of the world 
are still beating their plowshares into swords 
and their pruning hooks into spears; what a 
spasmodic industry earns is wrested from it 
to manufacture engines of war whose 
menace on the Pacific and whose ravages in 
Europe make a mock of the injunction: "On 
earth peace, and good will toward men." 
But Mr. Wilson has been awarded the Nobel 
prize for his services in the interest of peace. 
— Portland Spectator. 



RADICAL: One who believes in the use 
of dynamite. 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



We Stand for the Best in Business Training 



Munson 




School 



..for.. 



Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 

Send foi- Catalog 



Potted Plants 
and Ferns 

OF DISTINCTION 

SUITABLE FOR ANY 

OCCASION AT NURSERY 

PRICES 

Bay Counties Seed Co. and 

Nurseric 

404 Market Street, San Francisco 



PROMPT SERVICE 

is a feature of our daily luncheon. You can 
dine here in 30 minutes or less if you wish 

SPECIAL LUNCHEON. $1.00 

OR SHORT ORDERS A LA CARTE 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNER, $1.75 

Sunday and Week Days 

DANCING 

6 TO 9 EVERY EVENING 
BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old P00DLE-D0G Co. 

421 BUSH STREET. ABOVE KEARNY 
Phone Douglas 241 1 



Most Pleasant Time of the Year at 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

To Enjoy Sports and Social Pleasures 
CARL S. STANLEY MANAGER 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



imy and Nipiii Service 



Tires and Accessories 



Stockton and Sutter 

- GARAGE- 

DOLSON & ANDERSON, Inc. 

410 STOCKTON STREET 

PHONE DOUGLAS 5388 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CLUB GARAGE 

727 SOUTH OLTV I 9Tftl n 

Phone Main 2368 

IOS ANi.KI.FS. CAI-. 



DKNMAN GARAGE 
yOO-932 B1 BH -i i iii 
Phone Prospect 9-j6 

-an FHAKCISCO 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles to the Gallon" 



Associated Oil Company 



Sharon Bldg. 



San Francisco 



AUTOMOBILE STARTING AND 
LIGHTING SYSTEMS 

Give satisfactory results when given proper at- 
tention. We specialize on Electrical equipment, 
storage batteries, etc.. and guarantee satisfaction. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

Brand fc Cushman 
955 Post St. Phone Prospect 741 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



i* - » ■ • - a -J - • •-•-•■•- 



&an iFrauriiiri. (fjtrmttrlr 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coaat 



A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 



Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for 90 centa a 
month -including Sunday editiona. 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster. 
. . ... ... .>--. .-..; 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



BLANCO'S 

0'Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 
Buslnet ■ i am hei m M b, m. to 'J p. m. 

548 Sacramento St., cor. Leidetdorff 



Fourth St. Garage 

423 4th St., near Harrison St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Excellent Service 

Convenient 

Spacious 

Tires and Accessories 

PHONE GARFIELD 600 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Coven 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than seems necessary." The 
typewriter papers are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through your printer or stationer, or. if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the antire 
line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
37-45 FIRST STRFTT SAN FRANCISCO 



STATEMENT 
of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities of 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

(HIBERNIA BANK) 

Dated San Francisco, December 31, 1920 

ASSETS 

1— Bonds of the United States ($15,347,600X0), of the State of Cali- 
fornia and the Cities and Counties thereof ($12,697,400.00), of the 
State of New York ($2,149,000.00). of the City of New York 
($ 1,000,000 .00), of the State of Massachusetts ($1,162,000.00), of 
the County of Bergen, New Jersey ($200,000X0), of the County of 
Cuyahoga. Ohio ($90,000.00). of the City of Chicago ($645,000.00), 
of the City of Cleveland ($100,000.00), of the Cily of Albany 
($200,000.00). of the City of St. Paul ($100,000.00), of the City 
of Philadelphia ($350,000.00), of the City of San Antonio. Texas 
($72,000.00), the actual value of which is $33,324,431.94 

2 — Miscellaneous Bonds comprising Steam Railway Bonds $(1,768,- 
000.00), Street Railway Bonds ($1,486,594.51). Quasi-Public Cor- 
poration Bonds ($2,302,000.00). Municipal Notes ($155,000.00). 
and Bankers' Acceptances ($1,804,590.86), the actual value of 
which is 6,878,831.50 

3— Cash on Hand 3,116,690.68 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of 

which is 29,645,697.21 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned by said Corporation, 
and the payment thereof is secured by First Mortgages on Real Estate within 
this Slate and the States of Oregon. Nevada and Washington. 

5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of 

which is 487,611.04 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned by said Corporation, 
and are payable to it at its office, and the payment thereof is secured by pledge 
of Bonds and other securities. 

6 (a) — Real Estate situate in the City and County of San Francisco 

($409,246.26), and in the Counties of Alameda ($32,287.05). 

San Mateo ($30,985.58), Los Angeles ($73,685.98), and Contra 

Costa ($33,055.36). in this State, the actual value of which is... 579,260.23 

(b) — The Land and Building in which said Corporation keeps its said 

office, the actual value of which is 979,112.56 

TOTAL ASSETS $75,011,635.16 

LIABILITIES 

1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amouniing to and the actual value of 

w h'ch is ...$72,473,122.92 

Number of Depositors 80,849 

Average Deposit $896.39 

2 — Reserve Fund, Actual Value 2,538,512.24 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $75,011,635.16 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

By E. J. TOBIN, President. 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

By R. M. TOBIN. Secretary. 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA 
City and County of San Francisco — ss. 

it r E -rvL TOBIN and R ' M - TOBIN - bcin 8 eac " du 'y sworn, each for himself, says: That said 
ANifi i rv\ ' S Pres,denf . and ,hal said R - M - TOBIN is Secretary of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned, and that the foregoing statement is true. 

E. J. TOBIN, President. 
R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Subscribed and swoin lo before me this 3rd day of January, 1921. 

CHAS. T. STANLEY. 
Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Francisco, State of California. 












E»tab)i»hed July 20 1856 




AND 

California AotJerttB?r 
PRICE 10 CENTS SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 1921 $5.00 PER YEAR 




PLAN NOW TO SEE\^ RA ^ 

THE GREAT 

AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT 
EXPOSITION 

Six Days — January 22-27 

Largest Display of New Inventions, Auto Accessories, Heavy Machinery, 
Tools, etc. — 950 different lines, in all — making the most interesting and instruc- 
tive industrial show ever held in the West. 

If the visitor spends only 5 minutes at each booth it will take him 18 hours 
to see this great exhibition of mechanical goods. 

Dealers should arrange to spend at least three days at the Exposition to prop- 
erly select their 1921 lines. 

CIVIC AUDITORIUM 

10:30 A. M. to 10:30 P. M. 
A Show You Can't Afford to Miss. 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

1174 Phelan Building, San Francisco 

Has a practical system of placing manuscripts for 
publication, which is important to people who write. 

Frank criticism and competent revision are also 
available. 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORIE - McLAREN CO. 

FLORISTS, NURSERYMEN 

and 
LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Mateo 

Phone San Mateo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



CLOCK 
REPAIRING 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specialty 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

country 

We carry an attractive line of new clocks 

Work guaranteed in every detail 

CALIFORNIA CLOCK CO. 

418-19 Whitney Bldg. 133 Geary Street 

Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping, Manager 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St. 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 
Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital , 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



$ 23,828,500.00 
16,375.000.00 



Aggregate Assets. 30th 
Sept. 1919 




$377,721,211.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 



351 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in tbe Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji. Papua (New 

Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of California. National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Height and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 51, 1920 

Assets $69,878,147.01 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits 66,358.147.01 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,540,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund. $345,556.85 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK. President 

CEO. TOURNY, Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President A. H. MULLER, Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashier 
C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 
O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 
GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH COODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 
E. A. CHR1STENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 
GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE «i ORRICK. General Attorneys 



BOND 


DEPARTMENT 






Sutter and Sansome Streets 


THE ANGLO j 


\ND LONDON PARIS 






Phone Kearny 5600 


NATIONAL BANK 






San Francisco, Calif. 


OFFERS... 








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ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 

SAN W5 c »«Co 




TER 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY IS, 1921 



No. 3 



■DITcCIALv 




If we keep on making foolish laws and robbing the taxpayers, there 
will be nothing to protect. The States are their own worst enemies. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by ihe Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second- 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year, $5.00. Foreign: One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

Good idea of President Harding to discourage pomp and 

ceremony at Washington on March 4. We have had enough kingly 
masquerading to last this generation and the next one as well. 



Hearst's newspaper says that the California Assembly at 

Sacramento is "Unanimous on the Jap land law!" That doesn't 
speak well for it. As a rule politicians are wrong. Only by chance 
do they ever hit it right. 



It is under consideration at Sacramento to tax gasoline a 

cent a gallon. There is concentrated idiocy! Wouldn't it be con- 
siderably better to tax wine and beer and let people have those 
beverages with their meals? 



Now some fool legislator wants the State to keep amorous 

kids from eloping from Los Angeles to Santa Ana. and getting 
married. What are the parents of the runaways doing? 



There is a growing impression that the present State Legis- 
lature is really worse than ever before, though it seems incredible. 



We get some notion of the growing importance of the 

Panama Canal, when a second canal is considered necessary. 



When the newspapers get tired of the gangster sensation. 

they might find room to revive that other unsavory subject, the 
police court scandal. 



Sacramento lawmakers have opened a fight on the inde- 
terminate sentence. What they should fight is our judicial system, 
which politics has robbed of confidence and efficiency. 



State Controller John S. Chambers promises to do wonders 

in opposing State extravagance. Why doesn't John make a start? 
He has been talking economy for four years. 



The California Assembly asks the United States to protect 



-Former Internal Revenue Collector Joseph J. Scott is suing 



Mark Requa and his fellow capitalists of the Aloha Mining Company 
for $25,000, as tax expert for about eighteen months. Is it a softer 
snap to be tax expert than tax collector? 



It's hard to say whether the narcotic drug peddlers or the 

bootleggers are driving the more prosperous trade these fine days. 



Young W. W. Crocker is patterning after his popular and 

public-spirited dad, by mixing with the people who do things. The 
young man has just been elected treasurer of the Downtown 
Association. 



The passage of the Sunday Closing Law by our gelatinous 

Board of Supervisors, at the request of the Labor Council, will have 
one good effect — it will remove from the sidewalks the Bolsheviks 
that have been boycotting non-union barbers, in defiance of the laws. 



Congressman Volstead is reported to be dubious about sup- 
pression of John Barleycorn. He will be more dubious this time next 
year. Having been nine thousand years trying to find a satisfactory 
substitute for cold water man isn't going to quit so easy. 



That self-sacrificing philanthropist, William Randolph H, 

won't quit on the plutocrats that have a billion or two a year in 
incomes. What do they do with it all? What does William him- 
self do with his superfluous dough? He should have train- 
loads of it. 



If the Prohibitionists had political sense they would not try 

to stuff another Harris enforcement bill down the California voters 
throats, after the recent defeat of the first bill, which the late Dr. 
Gandier so highly approved. 



The Dry crusaders are trying to force Governor Stephens 

iver the Harris hurdles but he does not seem to like that kind of a 
race for re-election. 



It is a queer turn of political affairs when the Johnson law- 
makers at Sacramento want an investigation of the Railroad Com- 
Tiission. Poor old Commission. Been such a bugbear to California, 
t's a wonder nobody suggests its abolishment. 



-Making theatrical censors out of the State school authorities 



n California is certainly a subject for a four-reel comedy. Before 
.i .1- .l _ i u : .L-:_ ' 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15, 1921 



It is most inspiring to see how Chief Dan O'Brien 
A New Broom is using the new broom at headquarters with frantic 

energy. All the cobwebs are being swept out. 
Figuratively everything is being vacuumed, including the reputa- 
tions of the captains. Go slow, Daniel! Remember that wise old 
saying: "Pride goeth before a double somersault in the bouillon,' 
or words to that effect. There is another ancient but useful admo- 
nition relative to him "who puts on his armor not boasting as he 
who taketh it off." You never can tell what may happen. The wise 
official is the one who goes slow at the start as if he was walking on 
greased ice. 

We are constrained to this sermonizing by the newspaper enum- 
eration of all the terrible things Chief Dan will do the Chink gunmen 
if they start a war in Chinatown and make too much trouble for 
the coroner. But what's the difference as long as the coroner isn't 
kicking? We might forget that we had such an attraction as China- 
town if the Tong highbinders did not start something occasionally. 
Don't blow off all your steam at once, Dan, just to make those news- 
paper ginks happy by trying to make you out an easy mark. Go 
slow but sure and you may make a really first class chief — some- 
thing that we almost forget what it looks like. 



We are in receipt from time to time of 
Fools and Their Money complaints from .people that they have 

been robbed by buying stocks or bonds 
from brokers, who do not belong to the Stock Exchange. No doubt 
we should express great commisseration for the poor dupes, and in 
a measure we are sorry for them; but why do they have dealings 
with crooks when there are so many responsible brokers who are 
members of the Stock Exchange? These responsible brokers will 
give clients a square deal, and the stocks or bonds they sell are 
worth the market price. A foolish buyer who deals with an irre- 
sponsible broker not belonging to the Exchange, takes desperate 
chances with his cash, and too often finds verified the old adage: 
"A fool and his money are soon parted." 



Josephus Daniels has all his batteries cocked and 
Investigate the primed for the investigation of the three navy 
Right One balloonists who were temporarily lost in the snow- 

fields of Canada. There is talk of trying the men 
for selling accounts of their adventure to the newspapers, disgraceful 
personal quarrel, etc., etc. The morale of the Navy under Daniels' 
administration seems to be water-logged or worm-eaten, or some- 
thing. Josephus is the boy who should be court-martialed before 
anybody. 



prominent and successful as a self-made man of fine talents, affable, 
conscientious and earnest. In social and fraternal circles he was 
greatly esteemed for his admirable personality. Much sympathy is 
felt for his widow and two children, the older a fine boy of fourteen 



The much regretted death of G. H. Umbsen 
No Change in Firm of the leading realty firm of Umbsen, Kerner 
& Eisert, will make no change in the business 
arrangements of the concern. Such a contingency as the death of 
any of the members of the firm had been fully arranged. The 
business will proceed without any further change of personnel. 

Messrs. Kerner and Eisert had been many years associated with 
Mr. Umbsen and were prominently identified with the management 
of the original firm before the existing business title of Umbsen, 
Kerner & Eisert was adopted. On account of that long association 
of the members of the firm the regrettable loss of the founder will 
be all the less likely to cause business disarrangement. The subor- 
dinate members of the business have also been identified with it for 
years. 

Although the death of Mr. Umbsen came as a shock to many of 
the clients of the firm, it was known to his business associates and 
close acquaintances for some time that his health was failing. He 
had hopes of complete recovery by a trip to Honolulu, but unfor- 
tunately he grew worse instead of better and succumbed on board 
ship the day before his return to his home in San Francisco. 

He will be remembered in the business world where he was so 



years. 



Whatever amount the State of California 
The Tax Cormorants may decide on taxing gasoline, will be that 
much extracted from the pockets of con- 
sumers. Already the State is getting too much money from automo- 
bile owners. Every day the use of gasoline in various industrial 
ways is becoming greater. But there is no limit to what taxeaters 
will demand as long as the taxpayers furnish the money. 

To talk to the hungry cormorants about reducing government 
expenses is only breath wasted. In San Francisco, before the Rolph 
administration went into power, the city, under a grafting govern- 
ment, was carried on for less than seven million dollars. Now twice 
that sum is not sufficient; and the worst is yet to come unless drastic 
measures are adopted and a new charter adopted. In no other way 
can the necessary reduction be attained except by starting the city 
affairs on new lines, and cutting out civil service. When we had 
no such thing in politics San Francisco got along comfortably on a 
tax rate of a dollar on the $100 of assessed valuation. We had no 
public debt. Before long we may have a tax rate of $5 on the 
$100 and we owe for everything. 

Let us start the agitation for a new city charter and also for a 
new State constitution which is also required to get rid of the load of 
barnacles that threatens to swamp us. 



No matter what anybody may say about 
Give Us Correct Figures these United States of ours, most of us 
who have any right to be citizens like to 
see fair play. It seems to us that the cards are being stacked on 
the anti-Jap political game. Why should there be such a frightful 
discrepancy between the statistics of Japanese agricultural activities, 
presented by Col. John P. Irish, and the anti-Japs headed by Editor 
McClatchy of the Sacramento Bee. Irish used to be an editor, but 
his newspaper languished and died, which might be taken as evi- 
dence that he stuck too close to the truth for journalistic success. 
McClatchy is rolling in the lap of newspaper prosperity and you can 
draw your own conclusions. 

But in the great State of California, with its unnumbered chambers 
of commerce, civic centers, taxpayers' leagues, etc., can there not be 
found any believable citizen capable of enumerating the Jap 
farmers, and fruit packers, and picture brides, and all their progeny? 

We would cheerfully assume the task ourselves and settle the 
question but we fear our decision would so increase the greatness 
and glory of Brother McClatchy as the champion prevaricator that 
nothing could stop him from being Governor of California. And 
that would be a calamity, for he is a shining ornament to his noble 
profession, but as a Governor — the possibilities are even worse than 
we imagine. 

Until we know by accurate statistics whether the Jap problem in 
California is a menace or a fake why should we lose sleep over it? 



The wholesale change of police captains in San Francisco 

should be a saving of labor. At present the District Attorney has 
to find all the gambling houses and tell the police where to locate 
them. It may be different after this shakeup — perhaps? 



It seems that anti-Jap agitators in the Hawaiian Islands were 

amazed because the Mikado's subjects there made no howl about the 
new law prohibiting the teaching of a foreign tongue. The Jap 
is far too clever a bird to object to his children learning English in 
the schools. If they need Japanese they can learn it at home and 
will have the advantage of two live tongues. 



January 15, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Anti-Tobacco Crusaders 



THE CRUSADERS against tobacco are 
neither dead nor sleeping. They are 
very much alive, and believe that Pro- 
hibition has aided their movement against 
the sway of Lady Nicotine. 

Most men are inclined to laugh when they 
are told that, ultimately, smoking may be 
forbidden, although many recent and far- 
reaching laws restricting the sale of the 
cigarette have demonstrated the possibility 
of an anti-tobacco crusade. 

The anti-tobacco propaganda has been 
greatly increased of late by the influence of 
women, who also have the vote. A writer 
in "Good Health" says: "Unquestionably, 
propaganda against tobacco has reached 
large dimensions and made much headway. 
Many men, perhaps most men, still smoke, 
but an advance has been made in this great 
reform. Mothers clubs and parent associa- 
tions are forces for anti-tobacco propa- 
ganda." 

The main thesis of the protagonists in this 
movement is that a "more refined stage of 
civilization will rid itself of smoking." It 
is also argued that manners will change and 
that under a different system of manners 
smoking will be relegated to the "vulgar 
classes of society." It is astonishing how 
many people in our democracy are swayed 
by the thought that anything is popular with 
the "vulgar classes" or otherwise. Smoking 
is essentially a fashion. In other words, 
smokers naturally prefer tobacco as a means 
of social enjoyment, but, if there were no 
tobacco, so deeply grounded in fashion or 
custom is smoking that men would continue 
to smoke some substitute, as was actually 
done during the war in countries where the 
leaf was scarce — in Germany, for example. 

So far, no proposal has been made to pro- 
hibit the habit of smoking substitutes, like 
rose leaves or coltsfoot, and numerous other 
artificial tobaccos. Despite the virtual cer- 
tainty that these would take the place of 
tobacco, the object of the anti-tobacco 
gospellers is to prohibit the sale of the genu- 
ine article. This is a serious deficiency in 
their program, for many, if not most, of 
these substitutes are more harmful than pure 
tobacco. Researches, which have just been 
published in Europe show that the smoke of 
leaves of plants ordinarily esteemed bene- 
ficial is particularly toxic, a fact which has 
led to another inquiry into what is the 
deleterious ingredient of tobacco smoke. 

The results of this investigation were pub- 
lished recently in The Chemical News of 
London. About forty cigarettes were taken 
in which the proportion of nicotine was de- 
termined by chemical analysis. These were 



They Rely Upon the 
Women's Vote 

By Paul R. Marshall 

weighed and smoked in an automatic 
smoker. The ends were collected and 
weighed, and thus the weight actually 
smoked was known. About two-thirds of a 
cigarette is normally smoked; for example, 
in the first series of experiments the total 
weight was 29.7 grams, the ends weighing 
9 grams. In the second series the figures 
were 26.5 and 9 grams, respectively. The 
amount of nicotine in the inhalation was 
thus estimated. Knowing the amount in the 
burned portions, the amount destroyed could 
be calculated. The weight of the burned 
cigarettes being known, the nicotine in the 
inhalation is figured on this weight and given 
in percentages. In cigarettes weighing 29.7 
grams the percentage of nicotine in the in- 
halation was 0.92. In the lighter cigarettes 
it was more — 0.97. 

In the smoke of thirty cigarettes only a 
trace of nicotine was found. In the tobacco 
itself of forty cigarettes the percentage of 
nicotine varied between 1 and 2. 

These investigations are especially inter- 
esting, as the cigarette has always been 
assailed in legislation and in articles which 
condemn them as forms of smoking. Many 
people object to them on the score of clean- 
liness, smell, and the freedom with which 
they are smoked in drawing rooms, writing 
rooms and cafes. A difference of taste in 
such matters can easily lead to a difference 
in public opinion. One of the greatest dan- 
gers to which tobacco is exposed is the prac- 
tice of making cigarettes out of "mixtures' 
of tobacco and other leaves. One result of 
the war has been to increase the number of 
these brands on the market. If such a prac- 
tice continues, the cigarette may find itself 
out of public favor. Propagandists who do 
not know the cause are quick to complain of 
the "odor" of this tobacco. 
* * * 

Trivial as it may appear, the main force 
of the new propaganda is this appeal to 
taste. Even experts do not understand the 
danger here. To make matters worse for 
the smoker, it has boon necessary to produce 
cheap brands at the expense of flavor and 
aroma. Criticism of smoking has. therefore, 
taken a new turn, -hich is the appeal to 
taste or imagination and the fastidiousness 
which is so marked a trait of the American 
character. The propagandists now say less 
of the effects of nicotine, and wisely. For 



the public, and even the expert, the propor- 
tion of nicotine in a cigarette or cigar is a 
matter chiefly of guesswork. 
* * * 
That tobacco is in danger very few know 
as yet. It is unique among things of this 
world. No other substance soothes, cheers, 
stimulates, as it does; nothing else can take 
it splace when the usual foods and drinks 
are, for some reason, absent — and it does all 
this with less expense to health and happi- 
ness than any other solace discovered by 
man. After an exhaustive analysis of the 
substitutes tried, Professor Rupp writes: 
"Tobacco affords true enjoyment; it helps 
our organism over many difficulties and over 
many cares and hardships leading to de- 
pressed states. It satisfies thirst and hunger, 
as we learned during the war." 



FOR THE OPEN SHOP 

Some weeks ago, in commenting upon the 
stand of the Bethlehem Steel Corporation in 
refusing to sell fabricated steel to closed- 
shop contractors. The Spectator said, among 
other things: 

Already manufacturers and employers of labor 
who would be glad to run open shop if the unions 
would permit them to do so. are closing their shops 
to union men until the closed-shop agitation ceases. 

In short, a policy of reprisal is being 
adopted as a last resort against the unfair 
and un-American "closed shop." Press dis- 
patches inform us that Mr. Gompers and his 
corps of assistants, who so ably and com- 
pletely failed to elect those senators and rep- 
resentatives only who would do the bidding 
of Mr. Gompers, have taken a trip to 
Mexico, presumably to recuperate from the 
shock the election returns gave them. The 
correspondents seem to believe that these 
gentlemen prefer to be absent during the 
period of general wage reductions which 
they so confidently proclaimed, only a short 
time ago, would not be permitted, quite re- 
gardless of the fact that wage advances were 
secured solely upon the ground of the in- 
creased cost of living, and must inevitably 
follow the downward trend of prices. 

In a number of instances employes have 
voluntarily accepted reductions, but never, 
as far as The Spectator has been able lo 
discover, with the sanction of Mr. Gompers 
and the inner official circle of organized 
labor. The real workingmen of the country 
rather generally recognize the fact that they 
must do their part toward reducing living 
costs, even if the professional workingmen, 
headed by Mr. Gompers. do not. 

Signs are not lacking either that these 
same workingmen are beginning to dimly 
realize that the closed-shop methods of the 
leaders and the frequent strikes to enforce 
these methods have largely alienated public 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15, 1921 



California Unfavorable to Blue Laws 



IT IS TO BE HOPED that the intelligent 
portion of the American public, which is 
the larger one, realizes that the recent 
agitation for a restoration of the old Puritan 
Blue Laws of Connecticut, is not a spon- 
taneous popular desire. It is the expression 
of a small but carefully organized minority, 
part of which is sincere and part of which 
is less influenced by moral scruples than by 
mercenary considerations. 

Prohibition having gone into effect, many 
clerical politicians who found the dry agita- 
tion so beneficial to their pockets are out of 
jobs. The New York World estimates that 
there are 20,000 unemployed preachers in 
the United States at .present ; either they are 
without pulpits, or their congregations are 
unable or unwilling to give them salaries 
they can live on. 

While the prohibition agitation was in full 
swing, a great many needy preachers eked 
out their meagre salaries by acting as col- 
lection agents for the Anti-iSaloon League. 
Those clerical collectors were the authorized 
agents of the League, and empowered to 
take out liberal commissions before forward- 
ing the collections to headquarters. The 
particulars of the collection plan were fully 
shown to the United States Senate during 
debates on the whiskey question in 1918, 
and can be found in the Congressional 
Record. 

The sums contributed to the Prohibition 
cause by church-going contributors, the 
movies and other business interests that be- 
lieved their business would be improved by 
a dry America, must have been enormous. 
Mot even the Anti-Saloon League could fur- 
nish precise figures. 

Searching for a New Devil 

Professional moral reformers are now 
laboring to find a profitable substitute for 
the saloon, as a devil incarnate, against 
which to direct the abhorrence of the pious 
and loosen their purse strings. That is why 
we begin to hear such an insistent call in 
certain quarters for Sunday closing laws and 
all kinds of sumptuary legislation. So far 
the seed of moral agitation has fallen on 
rather barren ground. It is not easy to find 
such another mark of moral detestation as 
the abhorred saloon. Its enemies were 
legion and nobody could have the hardihood 
to defend it. So in the storm of popular 
disapprobation it disappeared, and the 
thirsty public is forced to rely for consola- 
tion on the "moonshiners," "blind pigs" and 
"bootleggers," whose regulation is a much 
more difficult task than would have been the 
sale of alcohol under Government control. 

California will oppose the adoption of 
Blue Laws as vigorously as it did Prohibi- 
tion. Our State did not believe that the 



Only Two States Without 
Sunday Closing Measures 

By Harvey Brougham 

drastic measures of the Anti-Saloon League 
were the best remedy for alcoholic intem- 
perance. As a matter of fact, intemperance 
was not increasing, but growing less. A 
generation ago the saloon had a stronger 
hold on American communities. It was not 
discreditable for professional men of high 
standing to be seen in the barrooms of hotels 
talking politics or private professional mat- 
ters, with glasses of toddy before them. 
Wholesale merchants invited customers out 
to take a glass of whisky or wine, after 
making an important sale. The old-fash- 
ioned gentleman tippled far more than was 
good for him, but people winked at such 
lapses as natural occurrences. In the British 
novels of the Victorian era we find many 
references to gentlemen falling under the 
table after too much port wine. In the past 
twenty years one saw very little of such 
social laxity. For at least a decade before 
Prohibition became a part of the United 
States constitution, prominent professional 
men ceased to be ornaments of any public 
bar. They might indulge in a social glass in 
their clubs, but decidedly the drinking habit 
was on the wane. 

The Old Witch Burners 

There is little doubt that the next genera- 
tion will see alcohol sold in public under 
some Governmental regulation, both as a 
measure of prudence and revenue. In all 
likelihood the educated class of Americans 
will regard the Prohibition methods of 1920 
as a form of moral hysteria, not unlike the 
puritanism of the days of Cotton Mather, 
the Massachusetts witch-hunter. In Mather's 
time learned judges agreed that witchcraft 
was a serious menace to the human race. 
The saints in those days did not object to 
hard cider or a swig of Jamaica rum, im- 
bibed judiciously behind the door, but they 
drew the line at old women riding through 
the air on broom-sticks and bewitching 
honest folk. The Reverend Cotton Mather 
was as sure of the fatal accursedness of 
those old dames on broom-handles as our 
ardent Prohibitionist crusaders are of deadly 
alcohol. In fact, of the two types of hys- 
terical intolerants, the old witch-burners 
were the saner. They had unshaken faith 
in the existence of a Devil who was con- 
stantly chasing humanity and dragging his 
captives down to the regions of burning 
brimstone. Rev. Cotton Mather has left a 
book in which he tells us how the Devil 
raged around the preacher's study when 



Mather was writing his sermons and expos- 
ing the cussedness of his Satanic Majesty. 
Mankind Growing Stronger 

When one believes in the existence of a 
visible Devil, it is easy enough to imagine 
that he may have human servants in league 
with him — witches such as Bobby Burns tells 
us Tam O'Shanter saw the night he got so 
soused at Ayr. But how intelligent people 
can work themselves into a frenzy of appre- 
hension and intolerance over the devil of 
alcohol, in these days of schools and news- 
papers, is beyond understanding. Humanity 
has been assimilating alcohol for thousands 
of years. How has humanity escaped de- 
struction all those centuries the race has 
been wine imbibing and beer swigging 
and whiskey tippling? We know that 
our ancestors were inveterate old samplers 
of the hard stuff and utterly contemptu- 
ous of soft drinks. Yet we have im- 
proved on the ancients in stature and 
strength. The armor that famous fighting 
men of Europe wore centuries ago would not 
fit one of Uncle Sam's average recruits. In 
the Olympic sports of today, we can make 
rings around the records of the ancient 
Greek athletes. How does that happen, 
when all the centuries we have been more 
or less faithful disciples of Bacchus? Why 
should the frightful moral and physical de- 
generation be confined to our own gen- 
eration? 

Votaries of Bacchus 

The old Romans, the sturdiest rascals of 
their day, were inveterate guzzlers. The 
Norsemen were frightful boozers when they 
got a chance. Alexander the Great, con- 
queror of the world before thirty, was not 
to be trusted near a full bottle. He killed 
his best friend when drunk. The guzzling 
and gormandizing of the Anglo-Saxons has 
never been outdone in history. The Gaels 
are one of the sturdiest races on earth, 
though they have held their native tipple in 
high reverence from time immemorial. The 
Japanese are increasing in height and 
weight, yet they have been good single- 
handed drinkers for at least a hundred years 
that we know about. In his book, "Fifty 
Years of Soldiering," Field Marshal Woolsey 
of England, warned white travelers, to keep 
off the streets of Tokio after 4 p. m., as all 
the Daimio's armed retainers were usually 
drunk at that hour and likely to cut down 
white strangers. 

Ardent Prohibitionists will have to dig up 
some elaborate statistics to convince the 
scientifically inclined public, that unless 
alcohol be radically exorcised the white race 
will do a joy-ride to perdition. We are ex- 
periencing a wave of crime, instead of the 
millennium, as one of the first results of Pro- 






January 15, 1921 

hibition. Worse whiskey than ever is being 
sold, and frightful bestiality by gangsters is 
attributed to poisonous liquor, sold in secret 
resorts of the vicious. There is a host of 
bootleggers and moonshiners, peddling illicit 
drinks, and in all probability the health of 
the public is suffering more than if the liquor 
traffic had been left to Government regula- 
tion and the home influences that help .public 
temperance. 

Adverse to Sumptuary Laws 

California, with all its civic sins, has the 
credit of rejecting Prohibition thrice. Our 
State has also been consistent in opposing 
Sunday Laws calculated to restrict public 
liberty. The Supreme Court of California 
in 1858 declared unconstitutional a Sunday 
Law, aimed at Sunday baseball and theatri- 
cals. A second sample of sumptuary legis- 
lation was tried on the California public in 
1861, but it proved to be a dead letter, and 
was repealed in 1883 at the request of 
Governor Stoneman. 

Oregon and California are the only States 
that have successfully resisted the intolerant 
old puritan spirit which has become doubly 
aggressive since Prohibition was "put over" 
on the American masses. It is now an- 
nounced by the International Reform Bureau 
that the Pacific Coast must be whipped into 
line for a revival of Blue Laws. This is the 
dying flicker of the flame of intolerance 
which flared up so fiercely in the olden days 
in Connecticut when they fined an unregen- 
erate brother if caught kissing his wife on 
Sunday. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



A BASS VIOL WITH A HISTORY 

The large bass viol at present being used 
by the Three White Kuhns in their musical 
numbers at the Techau Tavern is prabably 
entitled to recognition apart from its musical 
ability. This instrument has been charming 
the ears of thousands of people all over the 
United States with its deep throated har- 
mony for more than twenty-five years. It 
passed through the Dayton Flood, the San 
Francisco fire, r.nd many other interesting 
historical periods. Its throbbing notes have 
probably been heard in every city from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific that boasts a popula- 
tion of over 5000 people. The Kuhns were 
the originators of the Bass Viol Musical act, 
and its drawing power is still the wonder of 
the entertainment world. In addition to this 
number, a wonderful entertainment program 
featuring a Jazz Revue, under the direction 
of Rene Perry, Lucky Dances which offer 
Miss Saylor's chocolates, delightful confec- 
tions that rival imitation, and large boxes of 
Murad cigarettes to the lucky winners. Danc- 
ing still continues in the cycle of popularity 
and the harmonious offerings of the Techau 
Tavern Dance Orchestra under the capable 
direction of Elliston R. Ames, make it still 
more attractive. 



COMPARISON OF MONSTERS 

That many of the animals of past ages 
were much larger than any extant today is a 
mere "notion," as erroneous as it is preva- 
lent, according to Sir Ray Lankester, perhaps 
the most distinguished surviving scholar of 
the Darwinian school. This notion, says 
the noted scientist, is traceable to the "fan- 
ciful exaggerations of newspaper gossips." 

"It is true," writes Sir Ray, "that the 
mammoth and the mastodon were enormous 
creatures, but they were not bigger than 
their living representatives, the great ele- 
phants of Africa and India." 

To get a fair comparison as to "bigness," 
land-walking animals must be measured 
against other terrestrial animals, and aquatic 
animals with aquatic ones. "No extinct ani- 
mal known approaches the existing whale 
in bulk and weight. A big whalebone whale 
weighs two hundred tons — forty times as 
much as a big elephant. By far the biggest 
animals of which we have any knowledge 
are the various kinds of whales still flour- 
ishing in the sea." Surely no statement 
could more conclusive annihilate the com- 
mon belief in prehistoric lizards larger than 
any creature alive today. 

The largest of these great lizards ever 
discovered was found at Tendagoroo, fifty 
miles from the coast in German East Africa, 
and brought safely to Berlin in 1912. "When 
stretched on the shore, resting on the belly, 
the body of the great lizard of Tendagoroo 
bulked like a breakwater twelve feet high 
and his tail like a huge serpent extended 
eighty feet behind it, while his head and 
neck reached forty feet along the mud in 
front." Any one viewing the awful length 
of the skeleton of this animal and comparing 
it with the eighty or ninety foot length of a 
whale might quite naturally arrive at the 
conclusion that the lizard of Tendagoroo 
was the bigger of the two; but if their rela- 
t i\ e bigness were to be measured in tonnage, 
says Sir Ray, the egg-shaped whale would 
prove the "heftiest o' the fam'ly." 



GUARDING THE PUBLIC RIGHTS 

Adoption by the Senate of the Poindexter 
bill which guards the public health and 
safety by prohibiting strikes on railroad sys- 
tems engaged in interstate commerce seems 
to have surprised Mr. Gompers and others 
of his ilk. They cling to the doctrine that 
the unions have the right to strike at any 
time, anywhere, and against anyone or any- 
thing, individual, corporation, or Govern- 
ment, and that the public has no rights that 
the striker need respect. This doctrine that 
the striker is superior to the .public and that 
the unions are bigger than the Government 
received a deal of encouragement when a 
cowardly Congress passed and a poor poli- 
tician of a president signed the Adamson 
law. But many things have happened since 
then; with a few machine guns ready for 
action, Mayor Ole Hanson proved to the 
Seattle strikers that the public rights were 
paramount to all others; Governor Coolidge 
demonstrated to the striking policemen of 
Boston that they had no rights that were 
superior to those of the public. In Kansas, 
Indiana, Texas — wherever strikers have 
sought to prove their claim that the law of 
violence and disorder was superior to the law 
of order and that the rights of a few organ- 
ized but lawless men were superior to those 
of the public, the outcome has been the 
same. The public has triumphed. That is 
why government by law persists. 

But that there shall be no such unthink- 
able result, the Senate has passed the bill 
that makes it a crime for any body of men 
to imperil the public peace and safety by 
interfering with the Nation's transportation 
facilities. The public will consider this a 
very excellent and necessary law. — Portland 
Spectator. 



"What has become of the overalls idea?" 

"Sort o' died out," replied Farmer Corn- 

tossel. "Didn't seem to be any way of 

makin' overalls expensive enough to give 

'em standin' as a regular fad." 




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Board of Medical Examiners (February 16. 1907), to practice 
in the Sale of California. 

OSTEOPATHY 

Specialist in Women's and Children's Disease*. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15. 1921 



Cultivate the Tourists 



WHEN will Northern California wake 
up to the .possibilities of the tourist 
business, as has Southern Califor- 
nia? There is only one California in the 
United States. Everybody in the Middle 
West or the Atlantic States who has money 
and time to spare likes an occasional trip to 
San Francisco. What are we doing to create 
the impression that San Francisco is the 
right place .or travelers of the best type to 
visit ? 

New York newspapers are quoting the 
statement of the general manager of Thomas 
Cook & Son, that the Oriental tourist busi- 
ness this year will be larger than ever. There 
are no fears that all the talk in California 
about the Japanese problem will become 
anything more than "talk." Never before 
have so many trips to Japan and China 
been planned. Ships will be crowded right 
through the spring to early summer. The 
five new, luxurious and fast steamships that 
are about to be placed in the Japan and 
China trade from San Francisco by the 



Pacific Mail Steamship Company will enable 
more Americans to visit the Far East this 
spring, as the older steamships from this 
port are already booked up. 

The new liners which have been con- 
structed for the United States Shipping 
Board and handed over to the Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company for operation will be 
equipped with the latest improvements, in- 
cluding apparatus to regulate the tempera- 
ture of the cabin, bedsteads instead of berths 
and a bath and shower between two cabins 
except on the upper promenade deck, where 
the staterooms have a private bath attached. 
The liners also have glass-enclosed promen- 
ade decks. 

In addition to heavy travel to the Far 
East, Cooks' manager reports, steamships 
going to Australia and New Zealand packed 
to their capacity and crowds waiting in the 
steamship offices for a berth to be canceled. 
The traffic to Honolulu and the South Seas 
is also very great. 



The Accessory Show 



W'th eastern exhibits pouring in by 
freight and express shipments, and with last- 
minute orders for space pouring in by wire 
and by mail every hour, these are busy days 
at the headquarters of the Pacific Coast 
Automotive Equipment Exposition in the 
Civic Auditorium. 

This is show season for San Francisco and 
Northern California, and the Equipment Ex- 
position is down on the calendar as the first 
of the big shows of the year. It will open 
a week from today, January 22 to 27, being 
the official dates. As it will contain many 
score times as many exhibits as either of the 
great Northern California auto shows, it will 
require even more time than either of these 
important events if the visitor would inspect 
it carefully. 

What will impress the spectator more than 
any other one thing as he enters the great 
auditorium will be the immensity of this 
year's accessory show. Over 950 different 
lines will be represented, at several hundred 
different booths. Many of the exhibits will 
feature inventions and appliances heretofore 
never demonstrated on the Pacific Coast. 

These will not be confined strictly to the 
automotive field but will include many inter- 
esting showings of a mechanical nature 
along other lines, among them being 
heavy machinery, tools and the like. Sev- 
eral new cylinder reboring machines will be 



offered for the public's inspection, according 
to telegraphic information received yester- 
day by Managers Frank Bryson and Arthur 
R. Quigley. 

Last year's show, while a huge success in 
a business way, catered almost exclusively to 
the dealers and garage men of the West. In 
spite of this fact, some 17,000 representa- 
tives of the much-talked-of General Public 
found their way into the Show. This year, 
the exposition is being made primarily a 
show to interest the motorists of the city and 
State, and all persons interested in matters 
scientifical or mechanical. 

The show management believes that by 
staging an exposition which will interest the 
general public and convince them of the 
advantages of the various improvements 
shown, they will also succeed in "selling" 
the dealers, garage men and the trade in 
general on the value of the appliances dem- 
onstrated. 

To this end, therefore, all arrangements 
are being made with the interest and the en- 
tertainment of the public in view as of pri- 
mary importance. Incidentally, however, 
every accessory and automobile dealer and 
every garage man within easy traveling dis- 
tance of the equipment exposition is planning 
to be on hand and to spend from three to 
five days in doing his "shopping" for the 



coming year, declare Managers Bryson and 
Quigley. 

Just to give the public and the trade some 
idea of the tremendous variety in the nature 
of exhibits for which space has already been 
taken, Managers Bryson and Quigley have 
made public the following list of lines to be 
represented at the exposition: 

Valve grinders, cleaning compounds, taps and 
dies, small tools, coils, vulcanizers, lamps, wrenches, 
gaskets, wheel pullers, garage and shop equipment, 
signals, universal joints, ball bearings, beamers, 
welding apparatus, carburetors, replacement parts, 
babbitt metals, tires, auto oil, camping outfits, igni- 
tion apparatus, specialties, timers, cylinder reboring 
machines, top dressers (auto), tops, air compressors, 
windshields, portable cranes, batteries, tire retreader 
outfits, gear and wheel pullers, spring lubricators, 
oilers, bearings, tire carriers, covers, bumpers, shock 
absorbers, headlights, transmission bands, cleaners. 
wheels, polishes, tire fillers, hacksaws, milling ma- 
chines, brake linings, tire tools, oils, electric instru- 
ments, carbon scrapers, lathes, tire repair equipment, 
grease and oil cups, magnetos, pistons, tanks, tire 
cases, springs, spark plugs, cutouts, pumps, gauges, 
patches, gears, soldering irons, pumps, radiators, 
grease guns, rim tools, inner tubes, locks, machinery 
and tools, piston rings, lock steering wheels, jacks, 
lubricants, steering wheels. 



POLO AT DEL MONTE 

Society will soon be filling up the boxes 
of the Del Monte polo fields. An Invita- 
tional Tournament is scheduled to start on 
January 29 and will continue until Feb- 
ruary 6. 

A number of local teams will participate 
in the matches scheduled. George Moore of 
Santa Barbara, who has recently taken up 
his residence at San Mateo, has already 
entered a strong four which will consist of 
himself as No. I ; Willie Tevis, No. 2; Elmet 
Boeseke, No. 3, and Col. H. G. Nutting, 
back. 

The Del Monte players on the senior and 
junior teams will probably be Hugh Drury, 
Eric Pedley, Harry Hunt, Carlton Burke. 
Felton Elkins and others. 

Officers of the Monterey Presidio are tak- 
ing active interest in polo inasmuch as the 
Post will have a representative team. 



PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 
- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Salhfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 



DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

908 Market Street, at Powell 

San Francisco 

Dept. N. L. EslablUhed 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



January 15, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Said Northcliffe to Josephus 



ENGLISH NEWSPAPERS are extract- 
ing some amusement from the pub- 
lished correspondence of Lord North- 
cliffe of the London Times and our own Mr. 
Josephus Daniels, secretary of the United 
States navy. Northcliffe has certainly scored 
off Josephus, for the latter, as usual, "flew 
off the handle," and when he was pinned 
down to an intelligent answer had nothing of 
the sort to offer. 

The discussion grew out of Northcliffe's 
statements to an American press agency in 
London when he said with regard to com- 
petitive navy building: 

"As for rivalry between the fleets of the 
United States and the fleets of Great Britain, 
our fleets are wanted for an entirely different 
purpose from yours. Ours is a fleet for de- 
fense and mainly for commerce defense. If 
my friend Mr. Secretary Daniels ever did 
suggest that the United States had to arm 
itself to compete against any combination 
of powers that might be formed against the 
United States, I should very much like to 
know what combination he suggests. There 
is no possible combination. Is it suggested 
that Great Britain should, for example, com- 
bine with the Japanese or the Chinese 
against the United States? I can imagine 
the howl that would come from Australia, 
British Columbia, and other of the British 
oversea dominions, if any such impossible 
situation were suggested. Perhaps some 
Washington newspaper correspondent will 
give my love to Mr. Daniels and ask him to 
name his combination." 
Daniels replied: 

"Give my love to Northcliffe. Tell him I 
want agreement between all nations of the 
world and no competitive naval building. I 
want all nations in the league to join. I 
want the doors of the league open in order 
that Austria and Germany may be admitted 
at the proper time. I re-state my remarks 
on the naval report. 

" 'An alliance between America, England, 
and Japan, or America, Italy, and France, 
limiting building, cannot obtain the desired 
result. Such an arrangement will be re- 
garded as an alliance in the old sense. It 
would be going back to an old idea in the 
balance of power, which would be looked on 
askance by the rest of the world. The only 
basis for peace is to have all nations come in 
as a buttress in the world against evil." 

"I am glad I have heard from Northcliffe. 
I fear he spoke on the strength of my report 
that I intended to recommend another three- 
year building program. I would not recom- 
mend that unless it were absolutely certain 
that we were going to stay out of the league 
or any association of the nations altogether. 



Northcliffe is a good fellow. We are fellow 
newspaper men, only he is rich and I am 
poor. He has a lot of mighty fine ideas." 
etc. All of which had as much relevancy to 
the real question as whether Josephus pre- 
ferred pie or hot biscuits for breakfast. 

Northcliffe had the last word in the dis- 
cussion and said: 

"I am grateful for my friend Mr. Secre- 
tary Daniels' kind remarks about me, but he 
has not quite answered my question. I 
asked: 'What possible combination against 
the United States does he suggest to which 
Britain could be a party?' I repeat: there 
is no such combination. If the League of 
Nations or any other association of nations 
including the United States can join effect- 
ively in forming a buttress in the world 
against evil, I think I have sufficient knowl- 
edge of public opinion to say that Great 
Britain would welcome it. 



HISTORICAL OIL PROPERTY 



Death Was Busy With the First Organizers 

and New Men Will Resume 

Operations 



An oil property, which is sure to excite 
great interest, is just about to be placed on 
the market. It has a most interesting his- 
tory. Some well-known Californians were 
interested in its development twenty years 
ago as the Cygnet Petroleum property, lo- 
cated on the "Ciervo Anticline" in Fresno 
county, twelve miles northwest of the 
Coalinga field. The best oil experts of the 
time reported favorably upon it. as did the 
State mineralogist. 

A strong company was organized to de- 
velop the property. Charles Fair, son of the 
famous Comstock magnate, was president, 
and the largest stockholder. Isiah W. Lees, 
the well known chief of police of San Fran- 
cisco, was another important shareholder. 
So was Joe Harvey, an enterprising capitalist 
and turfman. These three stockholders were 
on the ground in the spring of 1902 when 



Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



at a depth of 1200 feet the drill encountered 
oil-bearing sand. The analysis was satis- 
factory and the discovery created a sensa- 
tion in oil circles. Next came the reverse 
side of the enterprise. 

The derrick was destroyed by fire. Three 
of the principal capitalists in the enter- 
prise died within a brief space. Charles Fair 
the president and his wife were killed in 
France while motoring. The minority stock- 
holders were not in a position to proceed 
with the oil development, and the promising 
property remained undeveloped. Among the 
stockholders were the late George A. Knight, 
Judge Hibbard, Henry Eickhoff and Frank 
Daroux. 

The title of the oil property remained with 
Henry Eickhoff, the quarter section having 
been acquired from the United States by 
patent. This has made it possible for him 
to lease the property to a group of San 
Francisco business men, who have just com- 
pleted organization of the Sumac Oil Com- 
pany which will take over the former Cygnet 
Petroleum Company's properties, in which 
Charles Fair was so largely interested. 

The property acquired is technically de- 
scribed as the southeast quarter of section 
34, township 16 south, range 13 east, M. D. 
B. and M. Fresno county, containing 160 
acres. 

Recently an examination of the land was 
made by H. B. Frank, a geologist and prac- 
tical oil man, with fourteen years experience 
in the California fields. Frank's report con- 
firms all previous information about the 
tract. He finds the geological formation 
identical with the formation at Coalinga. It 
is proposed to erect a complete modern 
standard drilling rig and proceed with all 
possible diligence to drill and develop the 
land. The old Cygnet Company built a road 
from the plains into section 34 at a cost of 
$8000. This road is still in good condition. 
It is estimated that the cost of the first well 
will be in the neighborhood of $75,000. 

Of 500.000 shares of authorized capital 
stock of the Sumac Oil Company, permit 
was received at the close of last week from 
the State Corporation Department for the 
sale of 100,000 shares at the par value of 
$1 per share. The directors of the company 
include George K. McGunnegle. president ; 
R. N. Scheller. vice-president: Dr. Howard 
Herrington, secretary and treasurer; J. C. 
Steele and M. E. and Maurice De Rieux. E. 
M. Vail & Co.. with offices in the Claus 
Spreckels building, are fiscal agents. 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE CRANE Y, Proprietor 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



In The World of Commerce 



IT IS WITH A FEELING OF PRIDE that 
record is made of the very general im- 
provement in business conditions in the 
eastern part of the country. This is reflected 
by a better condition in Wall Street. All of 
which, it will be noted, was predicted to take 
place about this time by the News Letter. 
This is particularly gratifying, when it is 
remembered that there was a general price 
decline of 8|/2 per cent in the month of De- 
cember. Unemployment is slowly increas- 
ing but business readjustment is going on at 
a much more rapid rate than for some time 
past, ihe decline in commodity prices has 
not included any new lines but seems to 
have been in necessities in which a decline 
had already been going on. Coal, petroleum, 
paper, brick, cement, and gasoline are un- 
affected. The decline has occurred in tex- 
tiles, leather, agriculture, iron and steel 
products. Wages have been cut in some 
lines as much as 25 per cent. There is a 
shrinkage in demand, the buyers' strike is 
still on. But the buyers' strike is waning 
and, by this time next month, it is predicted 
by economic writers we will have reached a 
near-normal basis. In view of the whole- 
sale discharges, in the semi-professional 
lines, by large corporations just before the 
New Year much harsh criticism of an ad- 
verse character has been going on. One 
large corporation in San Francisco dropped 
148 of its dictagraph, stenographic force 
over night, as a New Year's gift to deserv- 
ing employes, without previous notice of in- 
tention. Such action is hysterical, to say 
the least, and one business man made the 
remark, in the hearing of the writer, that 
"any way you take it, it shows poor man- 
agement and a woeful lack of efficiency if 
148 employes, who were supposed to be 
working because they were needed could be 
dispensed with inside of twenty-four hours." 
That is the way lawbreakers are made and 
it is one sure way or bringing about a hatred 
of "big business" and its methods. In labor 
circles there has been but little deflation. 
Wages have been reduced, it is true, but not 
to the extent necessary to bring on a resump- 
tion of work in an active way and, until this 
deflation of wages happens, there is not 
going to be any active building operations 
undertaken. In every large center in the 
country there is a woeful lack of housing 
accommodations but these will not be fur- 
nished as long as materials and wages re- 
main at the price at which they now stand. 
This is just as true of San Francisco as it is 
of New York. 

A gratifying factor in the situation is 
found in the fact that at all the larger cen- 
ters where deflation has been most active 



and where liquidation of loans has been 
accomplished there is now a much easier 
money market. This is again an endorse- 
ment of the theories advanced in these 
columns. Deflation and liquidation have 
been most active in Massachusetts and 
money is easiest in Boston of all large 
centers. Banking accommodation is becom- 
ing easier in New York. 

SHIPPING. — There has been quite an im- 
provement in the incoming lumber cargoes. 
The smaller mills of the up coast are unload- 
ing their product. The owners have seen 
the handwriting on the wall and they have 
given up all hope of a raise in prices and 
have taken the sensible view that prices are 
going to come down instead. This has made 
it a comparatively lively time for the coastal 
lumber carriers. On the other hand, there 
is little or no business in export lumber to 
Australia, Central or South America. As 
far as general shipping business is concerned 
the old established lines, such as the Pacific 
Mail are holding their own. The Japanese 
liners are still doing a fine freight business 
with a passenger list which is good. The 
Shipping Board has at least twelve vessels 
waiting for better times, tied up. We have 
not yet arrived at the period when we may 
send out vessels without having a very defi- 
nite arrangement as to return cargoes and it 
seems that the Shipping Board is not taking 
any chances. It may be said that business 
with our overseas shipping concerns is dull 
lo bad. There will be no improvement until 
export and import business improves and 
that is entirely dependent on the weeding 
out process which began last October. Many 
of the houses that were established during 
the war have quietly dropped out of business 
altogether and others have retrenched in 
their operations. It is one of the best signs 
of the times that the older and more experi- 
enced houses are preparing for a great re- 
vival of business in late January or the be- 
ginning of February. 

INSURANCE. — The moral hazard again 
is drawing attention to itself in insurance 
circles. Agents are looking with apprehen- 
sion at the increase of fires, seemingly with- 
out cause. One insurance man spoke the 
other day of men in business who would 
prefer to being wiped out by fire rather than 
by the slow and disgracing process of the 
bankruptcy courts, their creditors standing 
a better chance. It may safely be said, how- 
ever, that there is much more talk than fact 
in this rumor. 

The big Otis Elevator Company fire illus- 
trates the futility of attempting to cope with 
such contingencies with the possibility of a 
lack of water and with the use of antiquated 



January 15, 1921 

methods for calling out the alarm. Every 
facility was at hand for doing things right 
but perverse fate seemed to dictate that 
everything should be wrongly done with the 
result that here is a tremendous loss, one 
that could have been in a large measure pre- 
vented had everyone observed care and dili- 
gence in bringing the department to the fire 
and had the fire department found sufficient 
water to cope with the fire when it finally 
did get to it. As far as the business man is 
concerned there is only one moral .possible 
and that is to keep well insured despite pre- 
cautions taken that would seem to make a 
serious loss an impossibility. 

Wilbur E. Malalieu, the general manager 
of the National Board of Fire Underwriters, 
is on the Coast and will establish the local 
agency or branch of that body while here. 

Philip A. Crosby is now compensation and 
liability underwriter for the Royal In- 
demnity. 

A. A. Johnson is manager of the San 
Francisco office of the Manhattan Life, a 
recent advancement, through the resignation 
or George B. Shelton. 

MINING. — Mining business in California 
on a large scale is very quiet. There are 
two reasons for this — the mining sections of 
the State are in the grip of winter, there is 
much snow and it cannot be expected that 
much will be done until after the spring 
thaw. In addition to the embargo placed on 
mining by Jack Frost and Jupiter Pluvius 
there is the fact that, owing to the prevailing 
quiet in every line of business, not much 
interest is being displayed by men of means 
in mining ventures. On the other hand, 
interest has not waned in mining operations, 
via the stock exchanges, and the renewed 
activity recently shown in the Nevada issues 
is due to new developments. All of the 
Nevada mine centers are looking up brightly 
and it looks like a lively time ahead. In oil 
there is feverish development in California 
and, in fact, in all other States. There has 
been news of many wells brought in in 
California. From Montana, where California 
capital is getting busy, there is further news 
of development. The oil field in the Devil's 
Basin, where the first well was located had 
been practically abandoned, on account of 
numerous quarrels which had blossomed 
when oil was struck in the Van Duzen well, 
is now again on the'map. A new well has 
just been brought in which is producing 
from the first sands. In the Mosby field, in 
Fergus county, there are numerous gushers. 
Lewistown and Roundup are again all ex- 
citement and spring will see a great rush 
into the new fields. The first location and 
the original oil discovered was by a Cali- 
fornia engineer. Gordon Campbell. 



"How do the Joneses seem to like their 
little two-room kitchenette apartment?" 
"Oh, they have no room for complaint!" 



January 15, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



Fallacy About Novelists 



A COMBINATION of novelists and busi- 
ness men would be hard to beat. 
That is the opinion of the famous 
Spanish writer, Vicente Blasco Ibanez, whose 
recent contributions to the American press 
have delighted thousands. 

The popular conception of a novelist is a 
man without business talent and of a suc- 
cessful merchant, a person devoid of literary 
genius. In criticizing that fallacy Ibanez re- 
fers to Victor Hugo, who, for the greater 
part of his life, earned a bare living. 

In the early days of Romanticism the 
drama and the novel paid much less than 
they do today. Besides Hugo had a very 
considerable family dependent on him. 
When he went into exile after the fall of 
the Republic and the triuhpm of Napoleon 
III, in 1852, he was practically penniless. 
He left everything he had to his family, re- 
serving less than 80 cents a day, in Ameri- 
can money, for his expenses in Belgium and 
England. Wealth and great success came to 
him while he was in Guernsey. He got some 
five hundred thousand francs for "Les Mis- 
erables," and another half million came to 
him from his other books. 

The Belgian publisher, Lacroix, tells in his 
memoirs that when he went to buy "Les 
Miserables," Hugo refused to read the con- 
tract the publisher had brought. The great 
novelist, during the night, drew up his own 
contract, and the business man was as- 
tonished at the masterly piece of work it 
was. "All the notaries of Europe put to- 
gether," Lacroix observes, "could not have 
produced a sounder document." In it Hugo 
had foreseen all the contingencies that might 
arise to affect his interests, and he put him- 
self on record against all the ambiguities and 
false interpretations that the future might 
try to exploit. 

When, after his return to Paris, Hugo 
came to invest the money he had made, he 
saw something that none of the real estate 
experts of the time had guessed, namely that 
the region around the Arch of Triumph was 
to become a fashionable residential quarter, 
though it had been quite neglected up to 
that time. The poet at once, bought the 
deserted fields that in those days stretched 
along the Avenue Sylau — now called the 
Avenue Victor Hugo. There he built the 
little mansion, since demolished, before 
which in later years the nations of the earth 
were to congregate in jubilee, and where 
death and immortality were finally to seek 
him out. When Hugo died, the land he had 
bought had tripled in value. Had his heirs 
possessed some of his intuition and not sold 



out at once, they would now own property 
in Paris worth $2,000,000 at least. 

Honore Balzac, the most perfect type of 
literary man in France, conceived the idea 
of working the copper-mine dumps left in 
Sardinic by the ancient Romans. Paris wits 
laughed at the famous writer, but some years 
later an English firm exploited the ancient 
mines and thereby made large profits. 



tempt at art decoration. There are too 
many homes of prosperous Americans, where 
a few thousand dollars for meritorious pic- 
tures would not be missed. Yet the decora- 
tive trash seen on the walls would not be 
worth thirty cents. 

A widespread cultural campaign is being 
started with 200 American societies back 
of it to stimulate popular interest in art. The 
poverty in art of the average middle class 
home is distressing and all the more surpris- 
ing as the inhabitants have abundant means 
to indulge in a taste for refinements. 



VICE OF PHRASE-MAKING 

IN THE TERSE and convincing style char- 
acteristic of his public statements, Presi- 
dent William Sproule of the Southern 
lacific Company, says: 

"We are now going into a period when 
the drones must either get out of the hive 
or work. The other men and women in 
industry generally will assert themselves in 
the interest of efficiency knowing that the 
downward course of industry must be 
checked; if otherwise because of falling 
markets and failing work they realize that 
such downward course must work to their 
own undoing. In all lines of business 
activity we are facing the condition at the 
p.esent time of having wages and expenses 
at their highest, while markets are dropping 
and the demand for our products is less 
than the supply. 

"I sometimes think a large part of the 
ticuble at present lies in the fact that we 
have permitted the thought of the Nation, 
which is the common thought of all, to be 
directed by phrases that creep into the ear 
of the average man bul often cover injurious 
things. Sentiment is too often born of 
phrase-making. 

"For instance, we have heard a great deal 
;.bout 'collective bargaining.' The phrase 
very often catches the |>eople generally with- 
out full understanding of what it may mean 
either to those directly concerned or to the 
public at large. Anoiher example, is the 
set phrase 'capital and labor,' which has 
crept into the relations nf employer and em- 
ploye. The working man knows he is not a 
capitalist and so publn thought allows the 
impression that every man represents either 
capital or labor through the use of this set 
phrase. It is not true Yet the misleading 
phrase 'capital and lat >r' has been allowed 
to get into the vernacu U until it has hard- 
ened in the mind of the man who works. 
The employe and the r aployer are in direct 
relation and they both -e capital, and with- 
out capital neither coul get along." 



ALLAN POLLOK RETURNS 

Allan Pollok, former manager of dining 
cars, hotels and restaurants for the Southern 
Pacific Company, has returned after two 
years absence to take up his former post. 
Mr. Pollok left the service at the time the 
Government took control of the railroads 
and became manager of the Palace Hotel 
in San Francisco. Recently he has acted 
as expert organizer for S. W. Straus & Co., 
owners of the Ambassador Hotels System. 
The opening of the Ambassador Hotel at 
Atlantic City was under his personal direc- 
tion and he completed all arrangements for 
the organization of the Ambassador Hotel in 
New York City which will be opened next 
April. 



tO STIMULATE ART 

At last somebody ha.' lit upon a real want 
in the average bourg is home — some at- 



We Specialize in 

Broken Hills Stock 

Now Selling at Bottom 

And other 

Active Nevada 
Mining Issues 

Listed on the 

San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Your business and inquiries solicited 



G. E. Arrowsmith & Co. 

Members S. F. Stock Exchange 

117 RussBldp. 
San Francisco. Cal. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




ociot 




THE FAIRMONT'S CHARM 

The Fairmont is undoubtedly one of the 
most charming hotels in the world. These 
fine winter days one can enjoy its advantages 
in scenery. Its advantages in service are 
always in evidence. 

One of the visitors in San Francisco who 
has been entertaining at a number of af- 
fairs recently is Miss Lolita Magie of Pasa- 
dena, who is the guest of Mrs. Leroy Linnard 
at the Fairmont. Miss Magie will return to 
her southern home this week. 

Mrs. Linnard gave a prettily appointed 
luncheon at the Fairmont for Miss Magie, at 
which she entertained: Misses Cornelia 
Gwynn, Marie Jeanette Sessions, Edith Ful- 
lerton, Gertrude Mitchell, Elvira Coburn. 

On Tuesday Mrs. Linnard also entertained 
at luncheon for her guest. The guests on 
that occasion were: Misses Marian Dunne, 
Nance Obear, Rosalie Grunbaum, Marjorie 
Dunne, Sallie Obear; Mesdames John Bright 
Burnham, Edward P. Baker. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Wallis gave an in- 
formal dinner at their home in Scott street 
for Miss Magie. 



— Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker has 
announced her intention of leaving for the 
East, to be accompanied by Miss Helen 
Chesebrough. Together Mrs. Crocker and 
Miss Chesebrough will go abroad for a 
period of several months. They will returr 



Our Entire 
Stock of 

Exclusive 
FURS 

at Reductions 
Ranging up to 
20 per cent. 



LOUIS GASSNER, Inc. 

I I 2 Geary Street 



in the spring, at the end of the cruise of the 
U. S. S. Idaho, when Ensign Templeton 
Crocker will return from South America. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Seward McNear chaper- 
oned a party of young people to Hobart 
Mills in Nevada, over New Year's. Among 
those in the party were Miss Amanda Mc- 
Near, Miss Doris and Miss Betty Schmiedell, 
Mr. James Moffitt, Mr. Harry Crocker, Mr. 
Barroll McNear and Mr. Alfred and Mr. 
William Hendrickson. 

— Mrs. Richard Mulcahy of San Mateo is 
spending this month in Nice, France. She 
has been abroad for the past few months 
and has been traveling with friends on the 
continent. 

— Commander and Mrs. Kirby Crittenden 
gave a dinner Tuesday evening for Admiral 
Alexander Halsted. There was a dozen 
other guests. 

— Mrs. Duval Moore gave an informal 
luncheon a few days ago for Miss Alice Gil- 
more, an eastern girl, who is spending the 
winter here with her mother, and is at the 
Fairmont. 

— Miss Mary Phelan has gone to the 
Yosemite valley to spend several days. The 
valley is especially beautiful at this time of 
year with its surroundings of beautiful snow- 
covered peaks. The Merced river is covered 
with ice and there are several excellent 
skating places in the valley. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Jackling gave 
a dinner Thursday evening at their apart- 
ment at the St. Francis for Mrs. William S. 
Porter who will leave soon for Europe. 

Mrs. Butler Breeden will give a luncheon 
for Mrs. Porter at the St. Francis on Janu- 
ary 19. 

— Mrs. Marshall Madison entertained at 
an informal luncheon on Monday and had 
as guests Mrs. Ralph McCurdie, Mrs. Clinton 
La Montaigne, Mrs. Paul Fagan, Miss Isabel 
Jennings and Mrs. Russell Slade. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Hammond, who 
came from the North to pass the holidays 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Ham- 
mond, have decided to remain here and have 
taken a house for the remainder of the win- 
ter, ihe couple were married in New York 
last May. They came West later in the 
summer and went to Oregon. Mrs. Ham- 
mond was Mrs. Dorothy Perry Bell of 
Boston. 

— Mr. Douglas Alexander has returned to 
Seattle after spending the holidays with 
his aunt, Mrs. Mountford Wilson, and Mr. 
Wilson in Burlingame. He has made his 
home in Seattle for the past six months. 



January 15, 1921 

— Miss Ruth Prior, who made her debut 
last season, is contemplating a trip East, and 
will probably leave town early in the spring. 
Miss Prior was hostess at a tea on Saturday 
afternoon at the Palace hotel. The affair 
was given in Palm Court for the Misses 
(Catherine and Barbara Sesnon. 

— The Burlingame Country Club was the 
scene Sunday afternoon of several informal 
luncheons, one of which was given by Mrs. 
Emory Sands in honor of General George 
Barnett, U. S. M. C. Mrs. Sands is visiting 
at the Andrew Welch home in El Cerrito. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Rennie Pierre Schwerin 
have closed their home in San Mateo and 
have taken apartments at the Fairmont ho- 
tel for the rest of the winter. 

— The engagement is announced of Miss 
Gladys Bell Cox of Sacramento to Mr. 
Charles D. Clinch of this city. The young 
couple became engaged on New Year's eve 
and are now telling their friends. The wed- 
ding will take place in May. 

— Miss Maude Younger has arrived in 
Washington after her long trip across the 
continent in an automobile. She drove her 
machine and was alone until some one in 
the Middle West presented her with a watch 
dog. On her arrival in Washington, Miss 
Younger was met by several motion picture 
photographers and her picture in the ma- 
chine with the dog is being shown in the 
news pictures all over the country. 

— One of the attractive affairs given for 
the debutantes and their escorts was the 
dance given Friday evening by Mrs. Andrew 
Welch at her home in Broadway in honor 
of her niece, Miss Frances Lent, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Lent, both 
of whom are visiting in the East. Since Miss 
Lent's return from New York she has been 
a guest at the home of her sister, Mrs. Paul 
Fagan, who assisted Mrs. Welch in receiving 
at the affair. 

Preceding the dance several of the guests 
were entertained at dinner at the home of 
Mrs. Bertha Welch on Divisadero street. 

— Mrs. William S. Porter and Miss Maud 











Buy Now— 

the things you need, for the 
prices are down. They went 
up a step at a time, and they 
can't come down the bannis- 
ter. If you wait for the 
"bottom to drop out" neither 
you nor the other fellow may 
be able to buy then. Buy 
now. 

Willard's 

Geary Street 

Between Grant and Stockton 











January 15, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



O'Connor will leave on or about the 
twentieth of the month for New York and 
will sail in February for Europe for a visit 
of several months, much of which time 
will be passed in Naples. 

— The engagement is announced of Miss 
{Catherine Crellin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
T. Arthur Crellin, of Oakland, and Dr. Lloyd 
Robinson Reynolds of this city. The wed- 
ding will take place in the early summer. 

Miss Crellin is a sister of Miss Anita, Miss 
Alice and Miss Florence Crellin and a niece 
of Mr. Earl W. Crellin of this city, and of 
the late Mr. Thomas Crellin of Oakland. 
She is a very pretty girl and has many 
friends on both sides of the bay. During 
the war Miss Crellin trained for a nurse and 
was graduated from the Stanford University 
hospital. Dr. Reynolds is an interne at the 
same hospital. 

■ — Mrs. William Griffith Henshaw will soon 
leave for New York and Europe. In New 
York she will join her daughter, Mrs. Alia 
Henshaw Chickering, who has been there 
several weeks, and they will go abroad to- 
gether. They will be away four months. 
Mr. Henshaw will sail on February 9 for 
South America for a three months' trip and 
will return here about the time Mrs. Hen- 
shaw returns from Europe. 

— Mrs. Frank King gave a luncheon on 
Friday and entertained Mrs. William S. 
Porter, Mrs. Charles Blyth, Miss Maude Fay, 
Mrs. Harry Scott, Mrs. Atholl McBean, Mrs. 
Charles McCormick and Mrs. Leonard 
Hammond. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles Blyth gave a din- 
ner on Wednesday evening at their home in 
Clay street. Their guests were Mr. and 
Mrs. Laurence McCreery, Miss Helen Garritt, 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel F. B. Morse and Mr. 
Kenneth Moore. 



AROUND THE THEATRES 



FLAMDOOZLE! ! 

Lawmaking to reach every kind of infec- 
tion is so popular now, it is curious we don't 
get after the automobile tinkers who call 
themselves mechanics. Lots of people call 
them worse names than "tinkers." 

One of their best tricks is to detail some 
inexperienced kid to repair a car, which 
needs some little attention. The untrained 
boy takes hours instead of minutes on the 
repair work and the boss tinker charges up 
the lad's time at a couple of dollars or so 
an hour. Of course the work done, is all 
botched up. and it has to be undone and the 
job finished by a mechanic. For the delay 
and annoyance the owner of the car really 
has an honest claim against the tinkering 
shop, but instead of that he is expected lo 
pay about the full price of a new car. plus a 
mortgage on his house and lot. One of the 
finest artists in this line of flamdoozle is said 
to be Fred Burg-or-something. on Geary and 
Polk streets. 



Some Extracts from the New Letter's Note 
Book 



Symphony Orchestra 

Sunday afternoon, in the Curran Theatre, 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, 
under the direction of Alfred Hertz, will pre- 
sent a most interesting program, the most 
important feature of which will be Mahler's 
first symphony in D Major. The nine 
symphonies of Mahler constitute one of the 
most important contributions to modern 
music, and this, the first performance of any 
one of them in San Francisco, will mark an 
epoch in San Francisco's musical progress. 
Ihe program will open with' Gluck's over- 
ture to "Iphigenie in Aulis," the remaining 
number being Bach's "Double Concerto" in 
D Minor for two violins. In the latter num- 
ber the solo parts will be played by Louis 
Persinger and Arthur Argiewicz. 

On the following Sunday the regular 
"Popular" concert will be given, the prin- 
cipal numbers being the "Alsacien Scenes" 
of Massenet and Grieg's suite of Norwegian 
Dances. Other numbers will be the overture 
to Maillardt's "Les Dragons de Villars," the 
Dream Pantomime from Humperdinck's 
"Hansel and Gretel," Johann Strauss' "Per- 
pelum Mobile," Grainger's Irish Tune from 
County Derry, the "Loin du Bal" of Gillet 
and Lassen's Festival Overture. 



WOULD HOLD MORE 

Here's the newest Scotch story: 

Donald had borrowed three pipesful of 
tobacco from his fellow-workman, Sandy. 
Getting a new bag he offered to repay it. 

"No," said Sandy. "I'll no be taking it 
now." 

"Take it, mon." insisted Donald. 

"No," said Sandy, viewing his carbonized 
pipe. '"I'll be cleaning my pipe after the 
kirk on the Sabbath, an' I'll take it fra you 
on Monday." 



New \ork real estate operations of the 
past year involved $3,493,595,000. This 
breaks all high records for sales, mortgage 
loans and building operations. It compares 
with $2,504,350,000 for the preceding year 
and $1,043,485,300 in 1918. For 156.650 
properties sold the aggregate assessed valu- 
ations were $2.422. ">50.000. 



NIGHTS OF CARNIVAL 
Thursday nights continue to be nights of 
fete at Cafe Marqu.ud, Mason and Geary 



streets, the "Dinner Extraordinaire" being 
only $2.50. All the evening at Cafe Mar- 
quard, as well as during dinner there is a 
musical entertainment and dancing. Bert 
E. Fiske's famous band and the Paramount 
Melodists contribute to the enjoyment. There 
are also such features as "Wheel of Fate," 
candy baskets, and lucky dances. 

The business men's lunch is an established 
feature, much appreciated. 



A BOON TO CAR OWNERS 

That "Higlos," the polish which renews 
the lustre of used cars, is worth its weight in 
gold, was demonstrated this week on the 
Avenue, when a second-hand car was 
quickly sold by reason of its improved ap- 
pearance from a coat of the remarkable 
cleansing and beautifying preparation. It 
works wonders on any painted and varnished 
or enameled surface, whether of automobiles 
or household furniture. 

Careful owners of cars who use "Higlos" 
hail it as a boon which saves them labor and 
money, as its timely use not only imparts 
a beautiful finish with little effort but pre- 
serves the original finish. The highly useful 
preparation is manufactured at Oakland, 
lelephone Piedmont 4324-W. The office is 
362 Russ Building, San Francisco. Tele- 
phone Douglas 256. 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

Gus' Fashion 

The MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT 

65 Post Street. Near Market Street. 

Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 

French and Italian Dinners. 

FISH AND CAME A SPECIALTY 



Established 25 Years. 



Kearny 2842 



Hair Priced Lower 

Hair Nets,doz. - - $1.00 
Hair Switches - $5.95 

Values up to $15.00 

TRANSFORMATIONS 

First Quality 

Now $9.95 

't ou can't afford to have your hair look 
badly. Prices like these appeal to all ladies. 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco. 




Would You Preserve Your Lustrous Eyes? 

Use Murine Eye Remedy 

No Dressing Table Complete Without 
ialve Murine As An Eye Tonic liquid 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15, 1921 



^fQtnoiJh 




THE MOTOR TRUCK in the past few 
years has acquired a definite and im- 
portant place in the transportation 
field, has kept pace with the demands of in- 
dustry, and has contributed materially to the 
development of the country. 

When spring comes there will be no signs 
of oversupply conditions caused by tempor- 
ary industrial slackness. Government re- 
ports emphasize the fact that crops this year 
for the most part are the greatest in the 
history of the country. It is true that prices 
to be paid the farmer for his crops may not 
be as high as in the past few years, but the 
fact remains that these crops must be moved 
from the farm. 

The motor truck for some time has been 
accepted by the farmer as a vehicle that is 
thoroughly practical for his purposes, and 
never in the history of the industry has the 
farmer shown the interest in the motor truck 
that he exhibits today. In the year just 
closed thousands of trucks were purchased 
by farmers, and the demand in the near 
future will be even greater than in the past. 

Fallacy About Insurance 

It is quite generally believed by laymen 
that when a company pays a loss, the 
amount paid is deducted from the amount of 
the policy. If a person carrying a five- 
thousand dollar policy was paid for a four- 
thousand dollar loss, the policy he is insured 
for would be only one thousand dollars for 
the balance of the term. 

Nothing could be further from the truth. 
His insurance is for the full limits of the 
policy, for each separate loss after the pre- 
ceding loss has been settled. The policy 
states: "The liability shall be reduced by 
the amount of such loss or damage until re- 
pairs have been completed, but shall then 
attach for the full amount, as originally 
written, without additional premium." 

Under this wording it is conceivable that 
a five-thousand-dollar liability policy might 
cost the insurance company two or three 
hundred thousand dollars. But it never will, 
because after a few accidents the policy 
would be cancelled and a pro rata amount 
of the premium returned to the assured. The 
reason for the cancellation is more devious 
than the justice of returning part of the 
premium. 

One very substantial precaution that 
should be taken in buying insurance is to 



take out the policy in a financially strong 
company. Court cases frequently drag out 
for years before the verdict is reached, and 
if the company issuing the policy has gone 
out of business before the case is ended, the 
policy holder faces costs and the payment 
of the verdict if the case goes against him. 



Start of Goodrich Business 

The recent Golden Anniversary of the 
founding of the B. F. Goodrich Company of 
Akron, 0., is a remarkable one. 

Fifty years ago when Goodrich was 
founded the uses of rubber were few. It 
was just beginning to be appreciated as a 
factor in industrial life. Since that time the 
ingenuity and inventiveness of man have 
created of this material many thousands of 
products which today are absolutely essen- 
tial to the continued progress of the world. 

Dr. Goodrich, a resident of New York 
State, was a physician by profession. How- 
ever, after serving as a surgeon during the 
Civil War, he took up real estate and shortly 
found himself in possession of a small rubber 
factory. 

Handicapped by a lack of funds, his first 
efforts to operate this factory were unsuc- 
cessful. He tried again with better success. 

The first important progress in the rubber 
business came with the demand for bicycle 
tires. Dr. Goodrich did not live to see the 
auto tire boom. 

Tootle With Melody 

Motorists thinking of visiting Japan are 
advised to read and consider seriously the 
following English-Japanese rules of the road 
that govern motor drivers in that country: 
At the rise of the hand of a police- 
man stop rapidly. Do not pass him by 
or otherwise disrespect him. 

When a passenger of the foot hove in 
sight, tootle the horn trumpet to him 
melodiously at first. If he still ob- 
stacles your passage, tootle him with 
vigor and express by word of mouth the 
warning "Hi! Hi!" 

Beware of the wandering horse that 



he shall not take fright as you pass him. 
Do not explode the exhaust box at him. 
Go soothingly by. 

Give big space to the festive dog 
that make sport in the roadway. Avoid 
entanglement of dog with your wheel 
spokes. 

Go soothingly on the grease mud, as 
there lurk the skid demon. Press the 
brake of the foot as you roll round the 
corners and save the collapse and 
tie up. 

Some Record 

The Ford Motor Company hung up an- 
other production record last Thursday with 
an output of 5673 engines, 4061 of which 
left the factory in completed cars. The 
company is maintaining its schedule of 4000 
a day despite the fact that the five-day a 
week schedule is in effect and the further 
fact that between 6000 and 10,000 men are 
off at the Highland Park and River Rouge 
plants. Increased labor efficiency is de- 
clared responsible for the maintenance of 
production schedules. 

Be Careful of Brakes 

Brakes should be tested each day. Before 
going half a block from the garage make a 
service test by throwing out the clutch and 
applying the brakes. If possible select a dry 
spot for making this service test. Under no 
circumstances should the car be taken 
farther if the brakes are not operating prop- 
erly. Drive back to the garage and see that 
the faults are corrected before driving out 
again. 

To keep the brakes in good condition: 

Once in two months remove the rear 
wheels and wash the brake lining in kero- 
sene. Never oil brake lining. 

Brakes squeal when they are glazed or 
when improperly adjusted. Squealing can 
often be stopped by removing wheels and 
roughening the brake lining with a file. 

If the brake lining is worn down to the 
rivets, sink the rivets still further or have 
the brakes relined. 

Wipe off and oil the brake mechanism 
every 500 miles, or at least once a month. 

Make regular systematic brake inspection 
a habit. The loss of a cotter pin might lead 
to a serious accident. When a lock washer 
is removed, don't put it back; use a new 
one. 

Points on Skidding 

Many cars skid, not only because of 
slippery streets, but also because of unequal 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



January 15, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



division of braking power. Jack up rear 
wheels and apply brake far enough so that 
it is just possible to turn one wheel by 
hand. Adjust brake on other wheel so the 
same amount of energy is required to turn 
that wheel by hand. 

When coming to a stop on a straight-away 
shut off the gasoline throttle and leave the 
clutch engaged until just before you come to 
a stop; this method of stopping is especially 
advisable in wet weather because it lessens 
the tendency to skid. 

In making an emergency stop, leave the 
clutch engaged, apply the foot brake, and 
pull the hand brake, but do not "lock the 
wheels." Keep the wheels rolling; other- 
wise there is danger that the car might slide 
or skid. 

Lubrication Life of Car 

Lubrication mistakes are the most costly 
mistakes a motor car owner can make. Im- 
proper lubrication will wreck the finest 
engine built; proper lubrication will safe- 
guard it for years and insure sweet running. 
Proper lubrication will do more, it will keep 
your car out of the repair shop. It will re- 
duce costs of operation. It will save you 
from road troubles. 

A motor car engine is a delicate piece of 
mechanism. It operates at terrific heat and 
under severe strains. 

In order to protect the parts of your 
engine from friction, it has to be kept well 
lubricated. Two metal parts, rubbing against 
each other at high speed, generate extreme 
heat. The greater the speed against the 
friction, the higher the heat. To prevent 
this friction, there is only a thin coating of 
oil which acts as a cushion between the 
metal parts. If that thin film of oil is not 
of good quality, it will not do its work. 

In buying lubricants for motor car, truck, 
or tractor, do not let the price consideration 
govern your choice. It costs less to produce 
poor lubricants, but the price paid in lost 
service, in repair bills, in vexatious troubles 
is many times the difference between the 
cost of good motor oils and poor oils. 

It is a general rule, worth remembering, 
that advertised and trade-marked products 
are safest to buy. The manufacturer who 
advertises his trade-marked products, knows 
that in order to live and prosper, he must 
put good quality into his products. That is 
your protection when buying advertised and 
trade-marked motor oils, gear greases and 
gasoline. 

Don't neglect the lubrication of your 
motor cars. Keep them well supplied with 
lubricating oil at all times. See that this oil 
is pure, tested to stand the hard usage it will 
get in the engine, and renew it often so that 
no sediment may remain to carbonize valves 
and cylinders. 

Good motor oils — trade-marked oils — will 
save from worry and expenses of upkeep. 



Repair for Cracked Nut 

When a nut cannot be replaced, due to 
its peculiar size or thread try the following 
method: Place nut in vise and file a recess 
on the inner surface so as to form a shoul- 
der. Then secure a heavy washer and force 
over the part that has been filed down. 

When turned in place the washer cannot 
come off and it will hold a cracked nut from 
opening up. If desired, the crack can then 
be brazed. 

To Prevent Checking 

The heat from the sun's rays will rapidly 
dry out the paint of an automobile body and 
rain will penetrate the paint leaving it 
streaked and faded, likewise mud will spot 
it. As a protection from the elements a 
mixture of linseed oil and varnish applied 
with a soft rag will shed rain and prevent 
checking due to sunlight. This will also 
restore to some extent the original lustre of 
the paint. Use a mixture consisting of one- 
tenth varnish and nine-tenths linseed oil. 

Changing Tires 

In changing tires on demountable rims, it 
is not necessary to remove the two lugs near 
the valve stem. This saves considerable 
time. 

* * * 

Irregular Firing 

Moisture gathering on the exposed part of 
the porcelain of the spark plug will often 
cause irregular firing. This trouble may be 
cured by greasing the porcelain with gaso- 
line or hard grease. 

* * * 

Rapid Fire Grease Gun 
Here is a method of putting lubricant into 



the rear axle in double quick time. Put a 
common funnel in the filler hole of the axle. 
Remove the cap and nozzle from the end of 
the grease gun, opening the whole front 
end of the gun. Put the end of the grease 
gun in the wide end of the funnel and hold 
it firmly while screwing up the handle in the 
ordinary way. The grease will shoot into 
the axle in jig time, and a rinsing with kero- 
sene and wiping with a bit of waste will 
remove all traces of the operation from the 
funnel. 

Replacing Spark Plugs 

Spark plugs should never be forced into 
position by severe wrench action. They 
should seat firmly against a copper asbestos 
gasket with but little more force than can be 
applied with the fingers. 



ANNUAL MEETING 
THE JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS 

The regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of the Joshua Hendy Iron Works 
will be held at the office of the Corporation, 
No. 75 Fremont street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, on Tuesday, the 8th day of February, 
1921, at the hour of 10 o'clock A. M., for 
the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
to serve for the ensuing year, and the trans- 
action of such other business as may come 
before the meeting. 

CHAS. C. GARDNER. 

Secretary. 
Office: 75 Fremont Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



"No, your Honor, he didn't give a hoot 
whether I saw him coming or not." 

"How do you know he didn't give a 
hoot ?" 

"Well, he didn't blow his horn." 



ASSETS OVER $1,000,000.00 

PATRONIZING AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS 
IS PRACTICAL PATRIOTISM 

RICHMOND INSURANCE CO. 



OrRanized 1836 



Pacific Department 

266 Bush St., S F. 



Harold Junker 

Manager 



THE HOME 

INSUKANCC COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Go. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 



TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTR 



REASONABLE RATES 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15, 1921 



PLyEASURDS WAND 

"Obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 





ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS 
Orpheum's New Bill 

George MacFarlane, whose fine high bari- 
tone is one of the very best voices on the 
stage, will provide one of the high grade 
attractions on next week's bill at the 
Orpheum. Other features will be: Frances 
Pitchard and her company in "A Dance 
Duel ; " The six Kirksmith Sisters, a charm- 
ing sextette nf skilled musicians; the Swor 
Brothers in impersonations of the southern 
negro; Johnson, Baker and Johnson, in a 
novelty called "Practice;" Joe Lane and 
Pearle Harper will sing and dance in "The 
Man and the Manicure;" The Breakaway 
Barlows in a combination of comedy and 
dexterity; the Lightner Sisters and Newton 
Alexander in their one-act musical comedy, 
"Little Miss Vamp," will remain one more 
week. 



Alcazar Attractions 

"Cilivian Clothes" is a great popular hit 
this week at the Alcazar. It gives .place next 
Sunday to first local staging of "The Won- 
derful Thing." This romantic comedy has 
the same humorous and emotional appeal 
that made " Peg 0' My Heart" so fascinat- 
ing. Its scenes are laid in a fashionable 
New York household. A distinctive cast of 
quality will present it. 

"Marry the Poor Girl," Oliver Morosco's 
latest farce comedy success at the Little 
Theatre, New York, has first San Francisco 
presentation Sunday, January 23. It is by 
Owen Davis, author of "Peggy Behave." 



Mnntell Coming to Columbia 

"Three Wise Fools" ends its record run of 
a fortnight at the Columbia this week, and 
then comes Robert Mantell with a splendid 
repertoire of Shakespearean plays to attract 
the lovers of good acting. Busy days at the 
box-office ! 




^ <Svi&turu,&vaufc f a 



Next Week— Starting Sunday 



George Mac Farlane 

The Favorite Baritone 



Frances Pritchard 

in the "DANCE DUEL" 



JOHNSON, BAKER it JOHNSON 



The Six 
Kirksmith Sisters 



John Albert 

Swor Brothers 



LANE & HARPER I BREAKAWAY BARLOWS 

Lightner Sisters & Newton Alexander 

William Taylor— The Dancing Mac Donalds 

and 10 Vamps 

Matinees— 2Sc to $1.00 Evenings— 2. r .c to $1.60 

MATINEE DAILY— Phone Douglas 70 

Scalpers' Tickets Not Honored 




FRANCES PRITCHARD 
"Dance Duel" at Orpheum Nexl Wce\. 



SYMPHONY 

A ORCHESTRA 

Alfred Hertz Conductor. 

CONCERT SUNDAY 

CURRAN THEATRE -:- 2:45 P. M. 

PROGRAMME 

Overture. "Iphigenie in Aulis" C/ucfc 

Concerto for two violins Bach 

Louis Persinger Arthur Argiewicz 

Symphony No. I D Major Mahler 

(First lime in San Francisco) 



ALCAZAR 

THIS WEEK — Morosco's Phenomena] Success 

Spoken Word Version "CIVILIAN CLOTHES" 

WEEK COM. NEXT SUN. MAT., JAN. 16 

Lillian Trimble Bradley's Ideal Romance Blending 

Laughter, Pathos, Dramatic Thrill 

"THE WONDERFUL THING" 

Recent Hit at The Playhouse, New York 

NEW ALCAZAR COMPANY 

DUDLEY AYRES— ELWYN HARVEY 

SUN. MAT.. JAN. 23— First Time Here 

New York's Little Theal-e Farcical Success 

By Owen Davis, author "Peggy Behave." 

"At 9:45" 

"MARRY THE POOR GIRL" 

Uproarious, Wholesome, Piquant Fun 

Every Evening — Mats. Sun., Thurs., Sat. 



January 15, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



1 


SLEUTHING BIRDIE 

A Drama of the Ribbon and Veiling Department 

By Helen Hughes 


* 



I must have made a path in the tile flooring of the hallway 
leading past the door marked: "The Never-Sleep Detective 
Agency," in a tall office building on Montgomery street. It 
may have been the last lap of the fifteenth thousandth round, 
that some tension inside me seemed to give way. I recaptured 
my courage in a measure and entered. At that, I gave three 
chokes and a gasp before I could say: "G — good morning." 

"You tell me that you have had no experience, Miss?" 
The little man eyed me shrewdly. 

"No. We-11, not exactly," said I. "But I've always wanted 
to try and see what I could do. I think that I'm capable — 
I'll — I'll work reasonable, until I can demonstrate my ability." 

"You understand that you'll run up against a clever lot of 
brains in this line of work? And just now, when the shops are 
crowded with Christmas shoppers — Would you know it if some- 
one was trying to put it over on you ?" 

"Would I know it!" said I, indignant. "I should say I 
would ! " 

He chewed on this for several minutes. Then he excused 
himself, and went into another office. I could hear him talking 
to someone. When he came back he said: "We've got a job 
that we can try you out on. Report here tomorrow at seven- 
thirty." 

Say! Going down the hallway that I had slunk through, a 
half hour before, my feet hardly hit the tiles. Be-lieve me, I 
walked on air! Every third step I bumped into the ceiling. 
At last my ambition was realized. I, Mame Smith — Vera 
Veronica, for business purposes — was a sure-enough sleuth. 

At seven A. M., after an anxious, nightmarish night, I was 
on hand at "The Never-Sleep Detective Agency." The little 
man slipped me an envelope and told me to report for duty 
at a certain department store. I was to hand the sealed 
envelope to Levy — shall we call him Levy? — himself. He 
would be waiting for me in his office on the fifth floor. 

I felt very important; no tremors now. Twenty minutes 
later I stepped off the elevator at the fifth floor, and breezed 
into Levy's presence. He read the message, and motioned me 
lo sit down. 

"You have had selling experience, I presume?" And as I 
nodded: "You will be in the ribbons and veilings to start. 
Get acquainted with Birdie O'Callighan." 

He touched a bell on his desk. There appeared with the 
suddenness which suggested a conjuring trick a handsome 
fellow of perhaps forty. He was manager and floorwalker. 
On his heels came a young woman of perhaps twenty-five 
years. She entered with an air of importance; and by the 
way Levy beamed on her, I could plainly see that she was 
very much admired by her employer. She was pretty: and 
two cunnin' moles on her peachy cheek didn't hurt her lookt 
none to speak of. I learned afterward that this young lady 
was nicknamed "Warts", and that she was very much disliked 
by her fellow-employees. Levy introduced me lo them, 
saying: "This young lady is here on a little special work." 
Turning to me, he explained: "If you need help, signal Mr. 
Downs here, or Miss Daisy. Miss Daisy is the head of your 
department." 

It was decided that I should scratch my head as a signal. 
I was sorry, afterward, that we didn't decide on any other 
signal; for goodness me! How my head did itch the whole 
time I was in that store' I had the hardest time in the world 
to keep from signaling the handsome floorwalker every other 
minute. 



I was put in the ribbon and veiling department; and I met 
Birdie O'Callighan. I cultivated Birdie's friendship from the 
start. I hadn't been acquainted with her more than two days 
before I was sorry that I had ever set out to be a female 
Sherlock. I realized, sadly, that I was expected to sleuth 
Birdie O'Callighan. 

She was a beauty — with clear Irish-blue eyes, the sort that 
go laughing through life. She had the mind of a she-imp; 
but the soul of a saintess. I wasn't there long until I found 
that out. She had gone to work as a cash-girl when she was 
eight. Her vocabulary was made up of fifteen per cent under- 
standable English, and eighty-five per cent slang and plain 
blasphemy. 

But she was kind to me. She helped me with my Christmas 
sales, and gave me some of hers to swell my receipts — because 
I was new, she gave out. 

"Holy saints!" she said to me, the first day, after I had 
waited on a lady who had bought a yard of veiling, and in 
paying for her purchase had displayed a large roll of 
currency. 

"Say, kid. Levy wouldn't sleep three winks ternight, ef 
he could see yer lettin' that dame slip out with all that 
Irish ribbon (green-backs), an' only one yard of veilin'. 
Jest watch me, kid, an' I'll show yer how it's done. I'll 
wait on this little banty comin'. Something for youse 
madame? Veiling? Yes, madam. What color? Black?" 

Handling a bunch of veilings dexterously, Birdie selected a 
pattern in green — they were overstocked with green; holding 
it up to the woman's face and smiling sweetly, she went on: 

"Here, madam, is a wonderful bargain. It's rain-proof, 
sheds water like a duck's back. It's a bargain at forty-five 
cents. You look swell in green. Brings out the color in yer 
eyes. It's dead swell. Will one yard fit yer hat? Yes. madam, 
it'll fit. but 's long 's it's a bargain, take two yards. It's gonna 
be econ'my in lh' long run. Wen th' first yard gits holey, cut 
it off and use t'other end. This same veilin's gonna be six-bit! 
a yard nex' week. Speshul reduction for Chris'mas. Not much 
of this here exclusive pattern left." 

So the lady bought two yards, and two yards of black; and 
when she had left. Birdie turned to me. 

"Nuthin' to il. Kid. w'en once yer git th' hang of it. None 
o' these dames gits by Birdie O'Callighan wit' one yard o' 
veilin'. I'll tell th' worl'! I'd hand Levy his job ef they did." 

The next morning, though Birdie's eyes were still smiling, 
she was busy powdering her little shiny nose; and down each 
pretty cheek was a glistening path, made by two round tears. 

"What's the trouble?" said I, putting my arms 'round her. 

"I'm poor. Kid. an" cain't help them what needs me," she 
beefed. "Look at th' ol' geezer runnin' this store, an' rakin' 
in sheaves an' handin' it to th' bankers t' play wit.! An' my 
frien's wit" no Chris'mas, out where I live. An' Mrs. Flaharty 
sick this mornin'. an' that little darlin' angel o' hers all twisted 
with infantile paral'sis. wit" no clo'es an' no right kind o' 
grub. An' look at th' stack o' duds this store's got. piled up 
here! It's a blazes-to-blazes blankety crime." says she. 

That was my chance. I said: "He wouldn't miss a kiddy 
dress or two. would he?" 

She turned and looked at me from under her heavy, dark 
lashes. 

"Can th' chatter. Kid! Can it' That guardian-devil o' 
his tells him every time us kids winks an eye 'N me with a 
s-w-e-ll lieutenant dead stuck on me. an' not even a pair o 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15, 1921 



fiber silk socks to go with my two-forty-five kicks — a bargain 
what I picks up in th' basement. 

She laughed, but it didn't sound cheerful. 

"Birdie O'Callighan, turn yer switch! Yer runnin' on th' 
wrong track this mornin*. Say, Kid, I'm thinkin' my swell 
Lieut, won't never come my way ag'in. Tin Can Alley! Say, 
Kid, that place must look like Millionaire Row alongside the 
place I live. Kid, that Lieut, is g-r-a-n-d in his un'form. It 
ain't no hand-me-down, take it fr'm me! Tailored, an' fits 
like Theda Bara's shoit-waists. A tin chick'n on th' collar; an' 
stripes on his arm — M-m-m ! " 

"Tough luck, Birdie," I agreed. "But it's always darkest 
just before it gets light. Brace up!" 

Another day passed. At last came my chance! Birdie 
rushed in, all excited. 

"Say, Kid, th' Lieut, called me up an' wants me t' go t' 
th' Chris mas Ball. It's gonna be g-r-a-and. But how am I 
goin' with brown kicks an' black socks? 

I motioned her to the back of the counter, and whispered: 

"Say, Birdie, I got word this morning that I'm to be sent 
to the stocking counter. Now, say, Kid, I'll snitch a couple of 
pairs of pretty brown silk stockings, and pass 'em to you 
tomorrow, if you will land me a set of those Mary Jane bows. 
I want 'em for a Christmas present for my niece. I'll pass the 
stockings to you tomorrow at lunch." 

Birdie's eyes glistened bright, and the corners of her mouth 
curled into the sweetest smile. She whispered: 

"Yer kin count on yer Mary Janes." 

I went to the stocking counter, telling Miss Daisy my reason 
for changing. Somehow, I didn't feel as smart as I expected 
to. Birdie losing her job, and me tempting her to lose it, 
wasn't the star-spangled honor-garb I'd figured out. I'd made 
good on my first case — oh, yes! But I began to wish I 
hadn't. 

The next day, at lunch on the top floor of the store where 
they serve coffee-and for thirteen cents, I sat beside Birdie. 
Under the table I passed her a package — two pairs of best 
silk hose, and received in return a neatly wrapped package. I 
tried to comfort myself with the thought that at last I was a 
fully-fledged detective. I'd made good, and could see myself 
sought after by all the detective agencies in town. I hated to 
think that it had to be Birdie O'Callighan that I exposed; but 
I couldn't let that sad fact alter my career. 

Miss Daisy was seated three tables away, and opposite me. 
I scratched my head and made my escape, taking the elevator 
to the fifth floor. I rushed into Levy's presence. 

"Here's the goods, Mr. Levy. Do I keep my job? I told 
you nobody could put anything over on me." 

"Cert', you keep your job all right," says he. "Tonight I 
fire Birdie and you together. You understand?" He winked 
at me. All this time he was unwrapping the package that I 
had handed him. 

"I understand." said I. And then — 

I stood there dazed. I was getting cold and sick; for what 
do you suppose was in that package? A ragged little dress; 
in its folds was a note which read: 

"Mrs. flaharty's kid has got infantil paralsis it needs does this here 
is the size dress she wears. Anything yer kin do fer her fer Chrisinus 
will be qreatlie apreciated by Yurs troly. 

"BIRDIE O." 
A little later there was a knock on the door; a clerk entered 
saying: 

"Here is a package that I found on a chair in the dining- 
room, Mr. Levy, and it's for you." 

Sure enough, it was addressed to Mr. Levy. Inside was 
another note: 

"These air yer socks Mister Levy. Dont spend yer money watchin 
me Las friday at 5:33 warts took a pink an gren petacot an i dont 
know how many million things the las five years double my pay an 111 
watch her fer youse. Yurs troly Birdie O. 

' P. S. — tell the she-detectif she is some kid, but neds coachin. im 
goin to be married chrismus eve er id coach her fer youse. 

"P- S. — i wish everybody a merry chrismus, same as mine. Tell the 
she-detectif its the Lieut. — B." 



LIBRARY TABLE 



How many of our readers know anything at all about L. 
Frank Tooker? Those who do must have enjoyed him in his 
stories. He writes sea stories because he knows the sea. 
America has produced, just once in so often, a man who knows 
the sea and writes about it in a very fascinating manner. 
Tooker is one of these men. You remember "Under Rocking 
Skies ?"and, if you are a friend of rousing measure and sound- 
ing phrase, you must recall that book of sea poems — "The 
Call of the Sea." 

Mr. Tooker's latest book is "The Middle Passage." It, too, 
is of the sea, of the old slave trade, and it holds your interest 
with a gripping force. Incidentally there is interwoven a 
love tale and a thread of nobility runs through the whole 
story like a charming minor chord — Mr. Tooker's style has 
been referred to as "being at once fine, restrained and pas- 
sionately just." It is a story well worth reading, putting 
away, and then reading again. — Century Co., N. Y. 

Great Red Cross Work 

Henry P. Davison, a partner in the great house of Morgan 
when the war of wars was on, did his mite for civilization. He 
labored, through the millions of the big financial institution 
of which he is a part, to make the allies conquer and he gave 
of his personality in other ways, to the greatest possible extent. 

His tribute to the "American Red Cross in the Great War," 
which is the title of a book which has found its way to the 
book-sellers' shelves, is a volume for all Americans to treasure. 
A copy of this book should find its way to the library of every 
American family that, lest we forget, we may, when time has 
blunted our sensibilities and dulled our sympathies, again re- 
fresh our memories as to the horrors of war. 

It is a statement of facts that is as entrancing as the reading 
of an interest-compelling piece of fiction. The book is pub- 
lished by Macmillan Company and it is illustrated. The front 
piece is one of Pennell's characteristic pieces of work and the 
other pictures are made directly from the photographs. 
Price, $2.00. 



"Mamma, will heaven be as beautiful as they say in the 
Sunday school books?" 

"Certainly, my dear. Why do you ask?" 

"Places we go to in the summer are never as nice as the 
circulars." — Boston Transcript. 



"So the young heiress has promised to marry you in three 
years. Isn't that a good while to wait?" 

"It may be, but she's worth her wait in gold." — Boston 
Transcript. 



"Has your husband a good ear for music?" 
"I'm afraid not. He seems to think that everything he hears 
played in church is a lullaby." — Detroit Free Press. 

Jack — Is Tom lazy? 

Jim — I should say so. When we roomed together at college, 
he would wait until I finished my prayers and say "Amen." — 
Judge. 



He — Kiss me, and the world is mine. 
She — I see no advantage in that for me. 



A corporal in the 339th United States Infantry has just 
received official notice that he is dead. Once in a great, great 
while, these days, a letter gets in ahead of time. — Detroit 

News. 



'I see you are employing a painter?" 
"No! I can't afford one. I got an artist instead !"- 
Fliegende Blatter (Munich). 




• TA«LUHEO >••< 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a. m. t«> 2 i>. m. 

548 Sacramento St., cor. Leidesdorf f 



Fourth St. Garage 

423 4th St., near Harrison St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Excellent Service 

Convenient 

Spacious 

Tires and Accessories 

PHONE GARFIELD 600 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a liltle better than seems necessary." The 
typewriter papers are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through your printer or stationer, or, if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the sntire 
line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1655 



Imy and Night Service 



Tires and Accessories 



Stockton and Sutter 

- GARAGE- 

DOLSON & ANDERSON, Inc. 

410 STOCKTON STREET 

PHONE DOUGLAS 5388 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CLUB GARAGE 

727 SOUTH OIJVESTEEET 

Phone Main 2388 

LOS A.KGELES, OAL, 



PENMAN GARAGE 

900-932 BUSB STREET 

Phone Prospect 9(36 

s.\N FRANCISCO 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles to the Gallon" 



Associated Oil Company 

Sharon Bldg. San Francisco 



AUTOMOBILE 


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lention. We specialize on Electrical 
storage batteries, etc., and guarantee 


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GUARANTEE 


BATTERY 


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Brand 


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955 Post Si. 


Phone Prospecl 741 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Franci-.co 



We Stand for the Best in Business Training 



Munson 




School 



..for.. 

Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 

Send for Catalog 



Potted Plants 
and Ferns 

OF DISTINCTION 

SUITABLE FOR ANY 

OCCASION AT NURSERY 

PRICES 

Bay Counties Seed Co. and 

Nurserie. 

404 Market Street, San Francisco 



PROMPT SERVICE 

is a feature of our daily luncheon. You can 
dine here in 30 minutes or less if you wish 

SPECIAL LUNCHEON, $1.00 

OR SHORT ORDERS A LA CARTE 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNER, $1.75 

Sunday and Week Days 

DANCING 

6 TO 9 EVERY EVENING 

BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old P00DLE-D0G Co. 

421 BUSH STREET, ABOVE KEARNY 
Phone Douglas 2411 



Most Pleasant Time of the Year at 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

To Enjoy Sports and Social Pleasures 
CARL S. STANLEY MANAGER 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Office*— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



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SATURDAY, JANUARY 22, 1921 



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LIMITED AMOUNT OF STOCK IS BEING SOLD 

Par Value $50 

ALL STOCK IS COMMON 
NO BONDS NO MORTGAGES 

All necessary machinery, engines, boilers, etc., have been purchased for the 
construction of three all-steel AUTO FERRIES — capacity. 80 machines 
each. To operate between Seventh street, at Oakland Mole, to Ferry 
Building, San Francisco — V/i miles. 

PROPOSED SCHEDULE: 
Week Days — Every Half Hour. 
Sundays and Holidays — Every Twenty Minutes 

THE SIX-MINUTE FERRY is now successfully operating the Steamer 
San Jose between Crockett and Vallejo, and the Steamer Vallejo between 
Vallejo and Mare Island and has always paid its stockholders at the rate of 
8 per cent per annum. 

Monthly installments will be taken to suit convenience of modest investors. 

Subscribe now before values advance when limit of present issue is reached. 

For further detailed information, address or call 

NEW YORK & LONDON SALES COMPANY 

EIGHTH FLOOR, 948 MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Kearny 5918 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

1 174 Phelan Building, San Francisco 

Has a practical system of placing manuscripts for 
publication, which is important to people who write. 

Frank criticism and competent revision are also 
available. 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORIE - McLAREN CO. 

FLORISTS. NURSERYMEN 
and 

LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Mateo 

Phone San Mateo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



CLOCK 
REPAIRING 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specialty 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

country 

We carry an attractive line of new clocks 

Work guaranteed in every detail 

CALIFORNIA CLOCK CO. 

418-19 Whitney Bldg. 133 Geary Street 

Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping, Manager 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 
Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors - 



$ 23,828,500.00 
16,375,000.00 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept. 1919 _ 




$377,721,211.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

351 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian Stales, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua (New 

Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'I Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON, ENG.: NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 2lsl Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 51, 1920 

Assets $69,878,147.01 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits 66.338.147.01 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,540.000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund _ $343,536.85 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY, Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President A. H. MULLER, Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashier 
C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 
O. F. PAULSEN, Manager Haight Street Branch 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 
GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 
E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 
GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE 8t ORRICK. General Attorneys 



BOND DEPARTMENT 




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Phone Kearny 


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NATIONAL BANK 




San Francisco, 


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OFFERS... 










Jl selcQion of eight corporation bonds, to yield jrom 


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thus meeting the re- 


quirements of every investor. 










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ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 22, 1921 



No. 4 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second- 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year, $5.00. Foreign: One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

What surprise will the ladies spring on us in spring, when the 

short skirts go out of fashion? 



How much of a figure does the Teamsters' Union play in all 

the fuss over switching zones and charges in San Francisco? 



The de Young Memorial Museum is a suggestive object 

lesson for other wealthy philanthropists. Next! 



Two Sinn-Feiners, caught by Irish police, have been driven 

into a barn and the building fired. That's a new wrinkle for negro 
lynchers in the United States — or is it new? 



Governor Stephens has laid eight "economy" bills before the 

California legislature. Looks to us like a rehash of the fake 
"economy" program two years ago. 



We are for investigation of the Railroad Commission and 

everything political — if the legislative inquisitors will only pay their 
own expenses. Go to it, boys! 



Seattle is setting up a roar about its municipal railroad being 

a lemon. Surely those Seattleites are not such boobs as to expect 
it will ever pay. 



The San Francisco Chronicle's annual is out this week, bigger 

and better than ever, which is saying something. Everybody sending 
it to a friend in the East and Europe. 



Whether in rain or sunshine, the eager crowds flock to the 

new Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park, given so generously 
by M. H. de Young. And every year the crowds will increase. 



Mr. Joyce of Wilkes-Barre undertook to become a volunteer 

conciliator in the coal strike now agitating the town. Result — the 
front of his store has been blown out by dynamite. "Blessed are 
the peacemakers." 



-One of Governor Stephens' "economy measures" for Cali- 



The California legislature is at its old game "of "emergency" 

bills. Generally those are outright robbery by taxeaters. What are 
the Sacramento authorities doing to squelch the extravagance? 



fomia is the establishment of a Department of Labor. How many 



votes will that win to 
November election. 



him? He'd better read the totals of the 



Il is no doubt true, as the Civil Service Commission of San 

Francisco reports, that only I 7 per cent of city employes draw $200 
a month, or more. The Commission says that private firms pay 
more. What's holding those underpaid city employes from resign- 
ing and grabbing those inviting private jobs? 



If you make us give up our cigarettes we will make you pull 

down your short skirts, declare the young men of Urbana, Illinois. 
There's a likely scrap for you! Talk about the Sinn-Feiners and 
Johnny Bull. Comparatively a love spat. 

It makes our chests expand when we think that California's 

State University is bigger than any in the United States, but what a 
crimp in our bank-roll it is going to make if we keep it up. This 
year $15,000,000 is asked from the Legislature. 



It sounds like treason to mention it, but why should not 

prosperous citizens pay for the University education of their boys 
and girls in California? Many people who are saying little about it 
are doing lots of thinking. Taxation will soon be the burning 
question in America. 



Assemblyman Hornblower is after the San Francisco police 

with a legislative bill, to curb their "czaristic" methods in arresting 
gangsters in a high-handed style. A man is known by his company, 
Mr. Assemblyman. 



The San Francisco Bar Association is an influential and 

honorable body, but it will never get a medal for the "speed" it's 
showing in the prosecution of Police Judge Qppenhaim for bribery. 
It got a short step nearer this week. 



The Building Trades Council and the Builders' Exchange 

have signed an agreement to provide a permanent way of avoiding 
future troubles in the building lines. Fine! But how are they 
going to get property owners to invest money in building? You 
can lead a horse to the water-trough, but it's a different thing to 
make it drink. 



Suppose that Professor Plehn was advocating increase of 

railroad taxes till they all went into bankruptcy, what a noble patriot 
he would appear to the Bolsheviks who want him disciplined by the 
University Regents for accepting outside fees. Not that we believe 
it's the wisest thing in the world to have professors grabbing snaps. 

Of course it's a grand and gloiious thing to soak the Cali- 
fornia electric railroad lines with more and more taxes, so as to 
drive them into bankruptcy: but it will not be so lovely if the roads 
come back at us with 10-cent car fares, and reduced service in the 
thinly populated districts. That's just what's happening in lots of 
places. 



Two years ago the late Senator Nealon of San Francisco 

made a determined effort to prevent the State Normal School, for 
this city being located over on the Marina amongst the mud-flats 
and seagulls. Hearst's sheet desired to have the outrage committed. 
Now it is recognized that Senator Nealon was right and the school 
will probably be placed where he advised, on the site of the present 
school on Waller and Buchanan streets. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22, 192! 



©IToMAL 




An investigation of the State University 
The University Inquiry can do no harm. For one thing it might 
help to impress on the public that no 
branch of the Senate service is a private snap. Not that we for one 
moment wis'i it understood that our fine University is not honestly 
managed. Its regents represent the best to be had in the social and 
professional life of the State. It would be inconceivable that graft 
in the common sense of the word, could find shelter in the shade of 
our California temple of learning. 

But, the unfortunate fact persists in all branches of public service 
that the people in control are likely to forget their true positions as 
servants and not masters of the people. It is part of human nature 
to revel in the pleasures of "a little brief authority" and the average 
official whether a Regent of the State University, or a subordinate 
of the San Francisco Board of Education, no sooner gets used to his 
official seat, than he displays a wish to have things done in his own 
way. Egotism is two-thirds of everybody's existence and with public 
servants it is usually seven-eighths, if not totally — and then some 

Under our form of government every public institution which pays 
salaries, or contributes to political distinction, grows with what may 
be described as "rank luxuriance." Let the Legislature create a 
bureau to license bootblack stands and in less than no time it will 
become a "Department of Leather Industry." It will have experts 
to classify the kinds of shoes to be polished — black, brown, tan and 
black-and-tan. Learned chemists will be employed to write text- 
books on the effects of bootblack mixtures on the public's shoes 
and brogans. The State or Congress will start to make shoe-dyes 
and shoe leather itself, and furnish university extension courses for 
the elevation of shoe-shining into a fine art. From that stage to the 
construction of shoe factories and the breeding of cattle to furnish 
hides for the public tanneries will be easy. 

This illustration of the governmental tendencies is, of course, an 
exaggeration to magnify the lights and shadows of the picture but it 
is, nevertheless, instructive. American taxpayers would be stunned 
if they took time to analyze the costs of various governmental insti- 
tutions that are annually assessed against their purses. One cannot 
even begin to enumerate in the space of a newspaper article the 
expensive and in many instances unnecessary excrescences. 

As to our State University which is asking an appropriation of 
$15,000,000 this year, it was little more than an excuse for a 
university some years ago. Its ambitions were high and its pro- 
fessors talented and worthy men, but the institution was only a 
promise of what was to come. To hasten the fulfillment we engaged 
the best educational builders to be had. We encouraged them to 
make our university fit to rank with the notable ones of the United 
States and we thought that was a bold project. Now we lead all 
the States in America and our ambition is to make all the universities 
of the world insignificant in comparison. The scheme is magnifi- 
cent, but it is not common, hard practical sense. 

Because our university is too heavy a load for our taxpayers we 
should have no bitterness against the regents or the faculty. Cali- 
fornia has been given what she wished. Now if we desire to call a 
halt, let us do so decorously. A proper investigation can do no 
harm, but let us not allow an investigation of the State University to 
degenerate into a narrow political squabble, like a shake-up of the 
police. Our university is something to be proud of. Do not make 
its investigation a disgrace to the State. 



Speaking for ourselves, we are opposed to the paternal idea of 
forcing free education on people. Particularly does it appear inju- 
dicious to make our university a free fountain of knowledge for 
strangers well able to pay for the improvement of their minds. 
One of the great fallacies of the age is that Uncle Sam should be the 
benevolent knight errant of the earth — righting wrongs, crushing all 
tyrants, banishing the dragon of ignorance, and playing good 
Samaritan at any cost — even if national bankruptcy threatens. We 
might remember that good old Don Quixote set himself that task 
and the world laughs at the amusing story of his attack on wind- 
mills and other eccentricities. 



Why is there so little public interest in the 
Why This Silence? approaching election, for the acquirement of 

the Spring Valley property by San Francisco? 
Not a whisper emanates from the City Hall. Everybody in the high 
places is as dumb as a clam. Yet it surely is of some public interest 
and importance that all the money in the treasury is to be scooped 
out by a water company, which wants a lot more money for a frac- 
tion of its rusty and outworn holdings than it was hungry to accept 
a few years ago, when the water pipes were less leaky. 



We miss the old style of party politics in the 
Party Politics Needed efforts to recall the accused police judges, 
who are going along and collecting their 
salaries as if no mud had been dumped on their judicial ermine. 

People are asking whom the distinguished patriots at the head of 
the recall proceedings actually represent. People are so suspicious 
these days. 

Before we discard the party system of politics, for the direct 
methods now so popular, you could not throw even an accused police 
judge out of his job without showing why. Neither could any bunch 
of hoboes calling themselves "purity committee" take the center of 
the stage and nominate some Tom, Dick, or Harry, of whom the 
town had hitherto never heard. Honest citizens had to be shown. 
They insisted on party formality — the calling of mass meetings and 
the appointment of responsible committees composed of residents 
whose names carried confidence. 

In what are now called "the old corrupt days of party politics," 
the police court scandal would have been impossible. The public 
would not stand for it. Either a responsible party convention would 
take action in the matter, or there would be something like a Vigi- 
lante demonstration. If accused judges tried to hold on to their 
salaries and defied public opinion they would be speedily dealt with. 
If some bunch of small ward politicians undertook to nominate new 
judges and speak as if with the public approval, they might find 
themselves in jail when they got out of the hospital. 

Have San Franciscans all deteriorated? Not at all. It is the 
political methods that prevent the creation and proper expression of 
Public Opinion. 



It would be highly satisfactory to the con- 
No Job-Lot Selection servative interests of the United States if 

such a broad-visioned American as Charles 
Evan Hughes should be Secretary of State in President Harding's 
cabinet. The portfolio of Secretaary of State was usually regarded 
important and the best minds were enlisted in its responsibilities. 
In later years the selection for Secretary of State has been made 
from a cheap job-lot and the great office has been sadly deterior- 
ated. It would attain its former distinction by the appointment of 
Charles Evan Hughes. 



It isn't wise to place too much reliance on the press news of 

noting in India. But if true the Britishers are having a tough prob- 
lem, as the Asiatics seem to think it's about time for their inning. 



January 22, 192! 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

That Way Ruin Lies 



IT BOTHERS AMERICANS to think of the 
cost of supporting a standing army of 
I 75.000 men. How would we feel if we 
were trying to carry the load now crushing 
France into the dust — an army of 800,000 
men of all arms? This force of almost a 
million men is actually with the colors. It 
includes the French soldiers and all their 
colonials. 

These figures are accurate, for they were 
published in the Paris newspapers the other 
day, when the Minister of War, resigned be- 
cause he believed that the cabinet did not 
fully appreciate the need of increased mili- 
tary strength, to face the possible troubles 
from Germany and Russia. 

If France should persist in arming against 
internation possibilities of this and the next 
generation, the prospects of the unhappy 
taxpayers would indeed be unenviable. Mili- 
tarism has already made Europe bankrupt. 
Not one of the European nations is in a 
position to view the financial prospect with 
calm patience. Even England, the richest 
of them, is not in position to meet her Ameri- 
can oblibations. 

Lucky is it for the United States, that, 
until the last few years, we followed the good 
advice of the founders of our republic and 
avoided "entangling alliances." Even in 
these recent few years of departure from the 
precepts of our earlier patriots, we have in- 
curred a load of debt, beyond the dreams of 
our forefathers who gave a deaf ear to 
jingoes and idealists. 

Until a few years ago the military expen- 
ditures of the United States, extravagant as 
they were, taxed the resources of the re- 
public but lightly. The amount was small 
compared with the net earning power of the 
people. Still our outlay for the War De- 
partment and the Navy amounted to two- 
thirds of all our public expenses, the pension 
list included. 

* * * 

Our American army was a skeleton force 
compared with European armies, but it is 
well to remember that the upkeep of no 
foreign army or navy is as costly per man as 
the American fighting unit. A French sol- 
dier is called to the colors as part of the 
system of enforced military service. He is 
born to it, and is notified as one who be- 
comes criminal if not prompt in his response. 
At the specified time for enrollment the 
French recruit is warned in public posters 
to present himself for service, and there is 
no waste of politeness in the summons. 



Militarism and Bankruptcy 
the Same 

By Alfred L. James 

"Comply immediately or be punished." That 
is the style. 

The French soldier has no expectancy of 
a life of luxury in the army. He does not 
anticipate anything suggestive of fair wages. 
He proceeds on the understanding that he is 
giving his time of service for the good of his 
nation, as his ancestors had done and as his 
own children would do. A French force of 
800,000 under the colors, as at present, is 
therefore very different in its financial aspect 
from a large American army, fed expensively 
and paid what may be called a daily wage. 

Although France and other foreign 
countries get their armies for less cost per 
soldier than the United States, it has been 
demonstrated that they are surely pursuing 
the road to ruin. Every year their taxes in- 
crease. Statesmen are continually seeking 
new sources of taxation; but nevertheless 
the annual deficits are enormous and loans 
have to be obtained. The governments give 
their promises to repay those loans but how 
can they do so except in paper promises. 
Always the government outlay exceeds the 
national income and the victim of militarism 
gets closer to the day of financial reckoning. 
Governments, themselves, have no money. 
Their income is from the taxes they impose 
and if the taxpayers cannot sustain the finan- 
cial pressure the government must collapse. 

* * * 

We have been squandering money in the 
United States for several years as if dollars 
grew like alfalfa and there were four crops 
per year. We have heavy obligations to 
meet. 

* * * 

Before the United States Government can 
expend a dollar for the ordinary objects of 
government it must first collect more than 
$1,000,000,000 for interest on the public 
debt. That exceeds by hundreds of millions 
the total net cost of the government before 
the beginning of the great war. It was not 
so many years ago that the whole country 
"as in a furore over the first Billion-Dollar 
Congress. The interest on the public debt 
alone is now equivalent to a Two-Billion 
Congress. 

* * * 

It requires no elaborate calculation to 
show that if we embark on the career of 
militarism there can be no hopes of govern- 
ment economy and lighter taxes in the 
United States. Militarism will be more dis- 
astrous to us than Europe, for it will cost 



more per man and per ship. Taxpayers will 
be bled white. 

The sentimentalists are all on the side of 
huge armies and navies, to protect the flag, 
but wise statesmen should be able to accom- 
plish that feat without Uncle Sam's sailing 
around the world with a chip on his shoulder. 
The enemies we have are of our own making 
and sentimentalism and cheap politics are 
chiefly responisble for their existence. 



CHURCHGOERS NO LONGER 

The actual facts of the religious situation 
in all industrial countries, declared Dr. 
Orchard at King's Weigh House, London, 
are appalling. 

The modern man has ceased to go to 
church. Only the barest fraction of our 
population ever attends public worship, and 
that fraction is drawn mostly from the 
middle-class. It is a superficial judgment to 
say that it does not matter, and that attend- 
ance at public worship is no index of the 
strength of religion. Religion began in 
public worship, and it is the most serious 
question whether religion can continue. 



THE HOUSING CRISIS 

The housing crisis is not peculiar to New 
York. According to estimates made by the 
Chamber of Commerce there is a shortage 
of 1.250.000 dwellings in the United States. 
The number built in 1919 fell to 70.000 
from the annual average of 350,000 prior 
to the war. and the figures for 1920 are ex- 
pected to be even less favorable. 

This general shortage of housing accom- 
modations is undoubtedly due in large part 
to unsound conditions which are commonly 
regarded as local to this city In fact, home- 
building the country over is presumably 
under the blight of the same paralyzing 
opposition of prohibitive costs and artificial 
restriction which caused its prostration here. 
The war left building construction broken 
down from the strain of military necessity, 
but it is since the armistice was signed that 
it has received its most serious setback. It 
is suffering from the far-reaching evil of 
profiteering and graft in the building trades, 
which have inevitably affected conditions 
adversely everywhere. 

The National Council of the Chamber of 
Commerce has called meetings for the last 
of this month to discuss measures to relieve 
the situation. That relief can best be pro- 
vided by freeing building from its fetters 
to combinations and restoring it to the old 
conditions of honest construction. Give the 
builder an assurance that he can build 
honestly and without fear of extortion or of 
ruin and building will rexive. — New York 
World. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Fewer Jails, More Rope 



January 22, 1921 



BECAUSE a San Francisco .policeman 
emptied a charge of buckshot into a 
lad 14 years old, who had taken 
somebody's automobile, and given the offi- 
cers a chase of four miles, there seems to be 
some doubt about the propriety of the shoot- 
ing. No wonder the public mind is in a fog, 
when so many sentimentalists make martyrs 
or heroes of captured lawbreakers. 

Whether the 14-year-old boy who was 
shot intended to steal the car, or just took 
it for a free joy-ride, cuts no figure in the 
case. He knew full well that he was com- 
mitting a serious offense in taking the car; 
and he acted as one conscious of his guilt, 
when he made such a desperate attempt to 
escape. He would have got away, after a 
four-mile run, had not a policeman brought 
him down with a shotgun. 

Without accusing the injured boy of inten- 
tion to commit grand larceny, it is proper to 
say that most of the thefts of automobiles 
and tires in San Francisco are committed by 
very young men or boys. Our wretched 
politico-judicial courts are in the habit of 
turning loose, with a reprimand, boys that 
are caught in possession of stolen auto- 
mobiles. 

If not immediately set free, with a warn- 
ing the youthful offenders are "detained for 
observation." The proceeding is usually a 
farce and the culprits go home laughing and 
steal the next machine they think can be 
swiped. The general disrespect for law, and 
the lack of abhorrence for thievery, and 
other forms of rascality, are at the bottom 
of the public laxity of morals. We need 
not look for clean and honest public opinion 
until our courts of justice are made clean 
and honest. Public opinion is in need of 
disinfectants. 

If the courts be clean and honest they will 
speedily bring lawbreakers under control. 
The courts are the foundations of law and 
order; if they be rotten the whole super- 
structure of the commonwealth must be 
shaky. 

* * * 

The wave of crime at present is sweejing 
the United States and France, two of the 
civilized world's important democracies. 
sfi 3£ flP 

Paris is infested with desperate bandits 
and many of them are boys like our San 
Francisco outlaws. A recent number of the 
Paris Journal describes a fierce battle be- 
tween police agents and young bandits, one 
of whom was a girl. The thieves had stolen 
an automobile, and while going around to 
find a buyer, incidentally robbed a jewelry 



Remedy for the Wave 
of Crime 

By Harvey Brougham 

store of articles worth 42,000 francs, which 
they sold to a receiver of stolen goods for 
3500 francs. Police agents, on the track of 
the bandits found four of them. When 
pounced upon by the agents and ordered to 
throw up their hands, the youngest bandit, 
Albert Tellier, sixteen-and-a-half years old, 
fired his revolver point blank at the head of 
the nearest policeman. The flash scorched 
the man's eyes and caused him to fall, and 
the young desperado would have pounced on 
him and fired again had not another agent 
struck him on the arm with a club. 

In the desperate fight which followed, 
Henriette Miffone, twenty years old, mistress 
of one of the robbers, continued to fire on 
the officers until she was mortally wounded 
by a bullet in the stomach. All the bandits 
were captured. 

The young amazon who figured in this 
fierce encounter was well educated. She 
had graduated at sixteen years, second in a 
class of sixty-five pupils, and intended to 
become a teacher. She obtained a position 
in a bureau for the conservation of land 
titles, and seemed an exemplary girl, until 
she picked up with vicious associates and 
kept late hours. Reproved by her father 
she left home. Some months later she wrote 
from the provinces to her paffents that she 
wished to return and present her fiance to 
them, but her father had heard evil reports 
of her conduct and refused to pardon her. 
In revenge the bandits robbed the father's 
little hair store and repeated the robbery 
three times, when he persistently refused for- 
giveness to his erring daughter. Each time 
before the man was robbed, his girl had 
written him, renewing her request. 

* * * 

As to Tellier, the boy bandit, sixteen-and- 
a-half years old, who showed such fierceness 
in his attack on the police, he was a different 
type of vagrant. His people were honest 
French workers, but he detested work him- 
self, and took up with outlaws. 

* * * 

In this Paris affair we find two types and 
both sexes of outlaws represented — the edu- 
cated and intelligent girl, and the young and 
uneducated loafer Tellier who refused to 
work. One seemed as vicious and dangerous 
as the other. That education does not guan- 
antee morals has been shown in our San 
Francisco gangster expose. Some of the 
culprits appeared to be very intelligent, and 



the young man who leased the gangster re- 
sort, where unspeakable crimes were com- 
mitted, was a graduate of a Massachusetts 
University, it is said, and won a good 
record in the great war. 

The question is asked by intelligent people 
in the United States, as in France, whether 
the leniency extended to felons is not ill- 
advised? Will it become necessary for 
honest people, in self defense, to return to 
the drastic measures of the olden days, when 
burglars and highwaymen were strung up 
without mercy. Once that a robber's crime 
was established, nothing could save him 
from the rope but the king's pardon. The 
hanging of a highwayman was once an ex- 
cuse for a public holiday. 

The world must advance, and we cannot 
take out all the thieves and burglars and 
hang them openly on Twin Peaks, as the 
Londoners hanged their highwaymen at 
Tyburn, but some way must be found to 
abate the growing evil. We have been 
making the world so "safe for democracy" 
that we have made it unsafe for honest citi- 
zens. We are plainly on the wrong track. 
We are too tolerant of felony. Murder and 
chicanery we regard as trivial every-day 
occurrences. There is no longer a whole- 
some dread of the law and the gallows. Why 
not invest it with some of its olden terrors? 

The Chinese, who were scientists a thou- 
sand years ahead of us have never con- 
ciliated crime as a public policy. So, too, 
the Japanese. In China there is no phreno- 
logical professorship for the examination of 
the bumps of motor bandits, or burglars. If 
such rascals have been born with abnormal 
and defective brain-boxes so much the worse 
for them. The defectives are not sent to 
state institutions to be coddled for medical 
scrutiny and the reallignment of their bumps 
of criminality. They are taken out in double 
quick time and effaced from the census roll. 
It is large enough without them, think Chi- 
nese solons. In Japan, a nation of very 
practical people, it is considered slow work 
to expend an hour in awarding justice to a 
professional thief and murderer. If the 
court should find the villain guilty fifteen 
minutes before lunch time, the state is saved 
a meal. The hangman is ready with his 
noose and strangling machine. 
* * * 

Fewer prisons and police and more 
hempen rope might solve the troublesome 
social problems and incidentally a few of 
the yellow journalists who exhibit such tender 
interest in the protection of desperate crim- 
inals might have their necks stretched. 



January 22, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

World Laughs At Us 



COMMISSIONER KRAMER of Wash- 
ington, D. C, is the prince of bluffers 
or the narrowest of observers, if ac- 
curately described by the newspapers. 

The newspaper announcement is in effect 
that: "Commissioner Kramer believes that 
although liquor, some of it good and much 
of it bad, is still obtainable in large quanti- 
ties, the prohibition enforcement corps' work 
for the first year has brought a large meas- 
ure of success." 

Nothing could be further from the truth, 
in San Francisco, and the smuggling of 
liquor into the eastern and middle western 
States has made the prohibition there far 
less effective than on the Pacific Coast. 

The condition of the docket in the United 
States District Court in San Francisco is 
illuminative of the .prohibition enforcement 
methods. Judge Dooling is an industrious 
and fair judge, but he cannot do the work 
of fifty men and that number would be too 
little for the effective suppression of the 
illicit liquor traffic, which is injuring the 
health of the community, lowering respect 
for law, and putting fortunes in the pockets 
of a large number of scalawags. 

It can be said without any exaggeration 
that the peddling of poisonous booze is the 
leading business of American cities at this 
moment. In no other business are there such 
profits. The supply of moonshine whiskey 
cannot keep up with the demand, bad as the 
liquor is and high the prices. As long as 
such immense profits are to be had, great 
numbers of persons will engage in the traffic, 
for the chances of detection and punish- 
ment are few. 

The United States District Court, of which 
Judge Dooling is head, exercises jurisdiction 
in California as far as the Nevada line. That 
one tribunal could keep pace with an active 
enforcement of prohibition in such a region 
is ridiculous. Judge Dooling repeatedly has 
had occasion in his court to call attention to 
the inadequacy of the arrangements for 
trying booze cases. His officers of the court 
are energetic men. but the task set them is 
beyond all reason. The Government has not 
the money to carry on enforcement work in 
energetic style and even if that had been 
done the legal progress would be slight. 
Every defendant is entitled to a jury trial, 
and lawyers know what that means in the 
clogging of the wheels of justice. 

In Judge Dooling's court violators of pro- 
hibition who were tried by jury in Novem- 
ber last had been arrested in April, but could 
not be heard sooner, by reason of the over- 
crowding. Since that period there has been 
a reduction of the enforcement force, and 
John Barleycorn is better entrenched in his 
illicit enterprises. 

It seems to be an accepted fact that pro- 
hibition never has prohibited in the United 



Year's Failure of Prohibi- 
tion 

By W. L. Anderson 

States. In Maine, a banner prohibition 
State, there never has been effective teeto- 
talism. Whiskey has always been obtainable 
by anybody who sought it. Groggeries that 
did a concealed business, were raided some- 
times by the authorities, but the public be- 
lief existed that the State collected in fines 
the amount that the whiskey sellers would 
have paid in licenses, had the liquor trade 
been open. In other words there was dis- 
creditable connivance to evade the law. 

One year of ineffective prohibition has 
confirmed the opinion of most thoughtful 
and open-minded people, that the Volstead 
Act does more harm than good. 

As to the proposition that National tem- 
perance is preferable to drunkenness, there 
can be no argument. But is it possible in 
the feverish life of all our great cities to en- 
force sobriety, even approximately. Scien- 
tific thinkers are of the opinion that com- 
plete prohibition in our highly artificial city 
life is a mere chimera — an illusion of 
idealists. Impossible of realization it is in- 
jurious to a community in many ways, by 
substituting wrong methods for a right 
purpose. 

Prohibition idealists commit the error of 
believing that if people are deprived of 
groggeries and cafes that sell liquor, they 
will turn automatically to higher planes of 
thought, and morality. Instead of be- 
fuddling their brains with booze they will 
turn to intellectuality. They may become 
poets, painters and philosophers, and prefer 
university extension lectures and church 
sermons. 

The social and industrial condition of 
American wage-earners was never better 
than in the past twelve months. The moral 
condition of the Nation should have attained 
a high standard. Intellectuality should have 
advanced by leaps and bounds. What have 
we had> Why. a wave of crime — violent 
and terrible crimes that defy police regula- 
tion : and yet all the saloons are closed 
theoretically. Would the moral condition 
be worse if the closing was thorough? 

We were to have the dawn of the millen- 
nium and instead we have had a closer 
approach to Hades. 

Don't let us get excited over it. Let us 
rather be cool and wiser. No set of reforms 
can make earth a sinless paradise by adopt- 
ing a resolution in Congress. They have 
been trying to make saints of everybody 
since Moses produced the Ten Command- 
ments: but still we need police to catch 
burglars and as many jails to cage the 
swindlers. 



What prohibition has done in its first year 
is what sane people foresaw. It has changed 
an open traffic in-liquor into an illicit trade, 
which makes countless lawbreakers. It has 
broken up the saloons and beer-halls — clubs 
of the wage-earners, and driven the habitues 
into the blind pigs and slums where the 
gangsters and outlaws congregate. It has 
not stopped a single booze-fighter from 
getting diunk on poisonous liquor, as long 
as he has the price. It has turned into the 
pockets of a lot of the worst rascals that 
ever disgraced any trade all the taxes on 
liquor that Uncle Sam previously collected. 
It has made the United States a laughing- 
stock in the eyes of foreign distillers that are 
smuggling whiskey into America from all 
points of the compass. 

Even the theory of large employers that 
prohibition is beneficial to the world because 
of the greater efficiency of labor is a fallacy. 
Temperance, yes; but not prohibition. 

It is true that in Great Britain a large per- 
centage of workers are unable to labor on 
Monday because of Saturday-night drunken- 
ness; but it is worth remembering that 
millions of toilers look for surcease of their 
troubles by getting drunk one day in the 
week. Eighty per cent of British agricul- 
tural laborers have no expectation of escap- 
ing the poor-house in their old days and 
being buried by the county. The bright spot 
in their narrow lives is the fireside at the 
village inn and the mug of ale to deaden 
their sensibilities. That is their only glimpse 
of Nirvana. 

Deprive the toiling masses of their drink 
and make the world 100 per cent efficient, 
say the experts. What if the deprivation 
should turn the dull-brained "brother of the 
ox" into a revolutionary pessimist, furious 
with class-hatred and frantic to tear down 
the pillars of white civilization, even if he 
should perish in ruin? 



BETTER THAN GOLD MINE 
Here is a good one for you. Perhaps you 
have sampled some of those "soft drinks" 
with a mule's kick in them that are supposed 
to be "pepsin tonic." Two Yidishers from 
Siberia are the chief manufacturers in San 
Francisco. You or I could do it ourselves if 
we only had the gray matter. To 20 gallons 
of alcohol add the label of an ounce box of 
pepsin and all the cheap sherry wine you 
can find in Sonoma and Napa counties and 
commence at once to cord the kale in car- 
load lots. Two thousands dollars a day is 
a low estimate of what the two gents from 
Siberia are banking every twenty-four hours. 
Every drug store, candy store, blind pig and 
dope emporium in San Francisco carries it. 

And yet the Government is kicking about 
finding it hard to collect taxes. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22. 1921 



"Devil's Subsidy" 



Every day more and more people are dis- 
covering that the prohibition fad has hit 
their purses in a way they never imagined. 
For instance, tourists prefer not to travel on 
American lines, as the Volstead Act applies 
to them on the high seas as well as within 
the three-mile limit. A thirsty tourist might 
stand the three-mile limit but no fear of his 
sailing on an American liner, when its a 
"Sahara" for him all the way across the 
ocean and back again. 

With regard to this American shipping loss. 
on account of prohibition the New York 
World of recent date says: 

"The Department of Justice having ruled 
that the Volstead act applies to American 
ships, whether at sea or inside the three- 
mile limit, representatives of all steamship 
companies in the United States are prepar- 
ing to move on Washington to secure relief. 
They will appear at the hearing of the 
Edmonds bill to permit the operation of bars 
on American passenger vessels in foreign 
service. 

"There is not the slightest doubt that the 
inability to serve liquor at sea will adversely 
affect the passenger traffic of American 
ships. The Prohibition Law has not edu- 
cated American travelers abroad to such a 
pitch of either patriotism or morals that they 
will prefer a dry liner to one on which liquor 
is sold. As for foreign travelers, they refuse 
to patronize the bone-dry liner. 

"Is this the fine flower of national moral 
regulation? The handicap put by Prohibi- 
tion on the American mercantile marine is 
one of the obstacles to economic develop- 
ment resulting from legislation hastily en- 
acted, without regard to its far-reaching 
effects. But can the mistake be corrected 
by action which would compromise the 
national conscience? Exempting American 
ships from American moral regulation will 
appear to all true-blue Prohibitionist regu- 
lators as a devil's subsidy for the encourage- 
ment of the drink evil." 



EXTINCT MAMMALS 

What geologists term the Oligocene forma- 
tions contain the fossil bones of a great 
variety of strange extinct animals. These 
strata are among the most widespread and 
most regularly distributed of the Tertiary 
sedimentary rock formations in the Great 
Plains and cover a vast area in Nebraska 
and Wyoming. 

The lower Oligocene beds, a million years 
old, contain great quantities of the bones of 
extinct mammals of that name. They were 
clumsy brutes of elephantine size, having on 
the front of the skull a pair of great bony 



protuberances which, although hornlike in 
form, were probably not sheathed in horn. 
The head was long and large and of fan- 
tastic shape. In its thick, heavy body and 
short, massive legs the titanothere resembled 
the modern rhinoceros. It was doubtless a 
sluggish, stupid beast, for its brain was small 
in comparison with the size of its body. The 
brain cavity was only a few inches in diame- 
ter and was surrounded by thick bone, as if 
to withstand shocks in battle. The titan- 
otheres were the most formidable animals of 
the time, and though, so far as known, there 
were then no carnivores capable of doing 
them serious harm, yet they seem to have 
disappeared suddenly from North America. 

The animals of Oligocene time seem to 
have been abundant as well as varied in 
kind. Among the characteristic animals of 
this epoch were primitive forms of rhin- 
oceroses, peccaries, ruminants, camels, in- 
sectivores, and opossums. Some of the flesh 
eaters of the preceding Eocene epoch had 
developed into true carnivores, including 
many forms of both doglike and catlike ani- 
mals. The sabre-toothed tiger, one of the 
most formilable enemies of primitive man, 
first appeared in the Oligocene epoch. 



GORKY'S DOUBLE 

Maxim Gorky, during his visit to America, 
found that an imposter was personating him 
at Georgetown, S. C, and playing Gorky's 
drama, "The Lower Depths." Gorky went 
to see the show and found that when the 
curtain fell after the last act of his play a 
man made up to resemble him came before 
the footlights and told the audience in 
broken English how flattered he felt at the 
reception accorded his drama. Going to 
the stage door, Gorky tackled his imperson- 
ator, who confessed that he had perpetrated 
the fraud in many small towns. 

"I have also," he added, "passed myself 
off as Rostand, Sudermann and Maurice 
Donnay. It pleases the public and does the 
real authors no harm." 

Gorky was so amused at the man's cheek 
that he promised not to expose him. 



CALIFORNIA'S CROP REPORT 

Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank's 
monthly review notes that as a whole the 
output of California's farms and orchards 
was not up to that of 1919. 

Potatoes showed an increased yield of ap- 
proximately 1 ,300,000 centals, the estimated 
production being 7,973,400 centals. The 
orange crop is estimated at about 18,500,- 
C00 boxes, approximately 3,500,000 greater 
than in 1919, and the lemon crop at approxi- 
mately 6,000,000— an increase of 1 ,000,000 
boxes. The notable decreases were: Wheat, 
barley, rice, beans and hay. 

Production of rice was reduced 1 ,000,000 
centals and the price has declined. 

At the opening of the canning season ex- 



tremely high prices were paid for fresh fruits 
and vegetables, but those who were not for- 
tunate enough to dispose of their products 
early have met with serious disappointment, 
owing to the continued decline in commodity 
prices. Fruit growers are now carrying over 
a much larger percentage of many varieties 
of dried fruits than usual, notwithstanding 
the decreased output. 

Mineral production increased $45,600,000 
over the production in 1919, petroleum 
being the principal factor. 



NEW AUTO FERRY 

Actual operation of the new automobile 
ferry between San Francisco and Oakland 
will begin July I, according to present plans 
of the Six-Minute Ferry Company. 

"With stock selling at the present rapid 
rate, the entire issue will be taken up in a 
much shorter space of time than that which 
we had figured on at first ; this will make it 
possible for the company to go right ahead 
with its construction plans without delay," 
declares Forbes H. Brown, president of the 
Six-Minute Ferry Company. 

"We have been extremely anxious to set 
the beginning of actual operation of the new 
ferry system at as early a date as possible. 
Every day of the present inadequate service 
means continued inconvenience to the mo- 
torists of San Francisco and the bay district 
at large, and actual financial loss to the 
merchants and business men of this city. 
From every source we are urged to speed 
up operating plans. 

"It has not been until the present time 
that we felt that we could announce what we 
expect to make our opening date — July I. 
The big demand for the stock indicates that 
the remainder of the issue will soon be taken 
up by investors of all classes and we feel 
confident that barring exceptional occur- 
rences we will have the new ferry going by 
the first of July." 



PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland 's Home Treatment 
- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 



DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

908 Market Street, at Powell 
San Francisco 

Dcpt. N. L. Established 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



January 22, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



The Golf Tournaments 



The Pebble Beach gold golf vase tourna- 
ment will be held as was originally sched- 
uled. Owing to the fact that the Northern 
California championship will be staged at 
the same time some consideration was given 
to postponing the event. President J. A. 
McKenzie of the Northern Association was 
communicated with to ascertain if the gold 
golf vase competition would hurt the title 
event, but he replied that it was perfectly 
agreeable for the Northern golfers to let the 
vase play go on. Accordingly, the vase will 
be up for its second annual play over Wash- 
ington's birthday holiday. The gold golf 
vase was set up for the first time last year 
and the conditions are that it is to be .played 
for every Washington's birthday anniversary. 
It must be won three times for permanent 
possession. 

M. A. McLaughlin of Denver, former 
Colorado State champion, was winner last 
year. He will arrive at Del Monte shortly 
to start practicing for the gold golf vase. 
He is going to make a strong bid to have his 
name engraved on the trophy for the second 
time. 

A number of Eastern, Northern and Ca- 
nadian golfers, as well as local club swingers 
are expected to make entry in the event. 



The gold golf vase will go to the player turn- 
ing in the best gross score in the qualifying 
round. This qualifying round will be played 
on Saturday, February 19. The match play 
rounds will follow on the next three days 
with the final match on Tuesday, February 
22. The Pebble Beach cup will go to the 
winner of the match play. There will be the 
usual trophies for the winners and runners 
up in all flights. 

A medal play competition is scheduled for 
women over the Del Monte course on Sun- 
day, February 20. Both Pebble Beach and 
Del Monte will be in first class condition by 
Washington's Birthday. The extensive alter- 
ations and improvements will have been 
completed and players may look forward to 
excellent championship courses at Del 
Monte. 

San Francisco Lodge of Elks No. 3 will 
hold its second annual tournament at Del 
Monte over Lincoln's Birthday, February 12 
and 13, which falls on Saturday and Sun- 
day. Every member of the Elks order, re- 
gardless of lodge affiliations, will be eligible 
to enter the competition. It practically 
means the start of a State championship for 
Elks. It is expected that 150 to 200 Elks 



will participate. The committee in charge 
of the tournament is composed of N. A. 
Denvir, W. J. ("Bill") Bradley and J. J. 
Flatley. 

The California Golf Association has set 
July 21 to 23 for the third annual Junior 
State championship. This event coming in 
the summer when the youngsters are enjoy- 
ing their vacations will undoubtedly draw a 
big entry. In 1919 the first junior title was 
won by Ashton Stanley and last year by 
Egbert (Togo) Osborne. Conditions and de- 
tails of the junor event will be announced 
later by the California Golf Association. 

The Western Confectioners Association 
will stage a golf tournament at Del Monte 
next Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and 
Thursday in connection with their annual 
meeting. The committee appointed to run 
off the competition is composed of John W. 
Vogan, Charles Hotchkiss, Fred E. Krause, 
Oscar Boldemann, W. E. Bevans and L. C. 
Blunt. 

During the season a number of these busi- 
ness associations stage golf tournaments in 
connection with their conventions at Del 
Monte. 



"Thankful? What have I to be thankful 
for? I can't pay my bills." 

"Then, man alive, be thankful you are not 
one of your creditors." 



The Rector System of Gas Heating 

fills a long felt want for a convenient means of heating homes and one that is, at the 
same time, economical in operation. 

It starts and stops at the touch of a button in the same manner as the electric lights 
are turned on and off. Could anything be easier than that? GAS is the fuel used and 
heat is generated at the radiator. Thus, there is no heat lost through transmission from 
a distant central heating plant. All burned gases are drawn through vent pipes by 
mechanical draught and discharged to outside air. Therefore, there is absolutely no 
odor in the room. 

The economy of the system is a result of its unequaled efficiency and the ease with 
which the fuel consumption may be controlled. No big outlay of money in advance is 
required to insure your winter supply of fuel. 

You owe it to yourself to investigate the RECTOR SYSTEM before deciding on a 
heating plant for your home or place of business. We will gladly furnish an estimate 
and descriptive literature free upon request. 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 

San Francisco District 445 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Calif. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22, 192! 



In The World of Commerce 



Among the bankers there is now a much 
more optimistic note struck than there has 
been for some months. They profess to see 
the return of more prosperous times and they 
say that every clanger of a panic has been 
averted. As far as California is concerned, 
there can be visualized nothing but the most 
bountiful crops ahead. The abundant rains 
have guaranteed this. After nearly four 
years of semi-drought no one should com- 
plain of the heavy downpour of water which 
has drenched the State, from one end to the 
other. This not only assures the large crops 
the country needs but it also makes possible 
a continuance of an abundant supply of 
hydro-electric power. It is safe to say that 
the existing plants furnishing the "white 
fuel" will be enlarged to capacity this com- 
ing summer and that many new plants will 
be built. California could use twice the 
amount of power it now has available. There 
is a world-wide demand for California oil 
as fuel and the State itself should be en- 
tirely independent of that form of fuel for 
the manufacture of energy. All over the 
State the farmer is looking forward to one 
of the very heaviest crops he has ever had. 
And, in view of the downpour the question 
of the conservation of flood waters is once 
again to the fore. It is now it should be 
borne in mind that California is a semi-arid 
State and that if she is to continue to pros- 
per, in an agricultural and an industrial 
sense, she should impound her waters in 
seasons of abundant rains that she might use 
them in seasons when there is no pre- 
cipitation. 

The price of lumber is coming down and 
with a corresponding lowering of the wage 
paid carpenters and others who might be 
engaged in building operations there is 
bound to arrive a feverish building period 
to furnish housing accommodation to those 
who are sure to come to the State and those 
who are already here and who are crowded 
in locations where they would not want to be 
if given a certain freedom of choice. The 
bankers are well aware of this condition and 
as quickly as money assumes a more liquid 
character and other factors assist building 
operations are sure to begin again. Mean- 
while the banks are taking better care of 
their commercial customers than they have 
in months past. 



SHIPPING. — The situation in shipping 
circles remains much the same as for the last 
month and there are few signs of improve- 
ment. The export and import business of 
the city is practically at a standstill and 
shipping surfers in accordance. The Ship- 
ping Board has vessels tied up at the docks. 



waiting until cargoes may be depended on 
as a sure thing. We haven't arrived at that 
state where the Shipping Board will take a 
chance on return cargoes. The private lines 
are doing only a fair to middling freight 
business while the passenger lists are light. 
Probably the most exciting event of the 
week was the arrival of the S. S. Creole 
State, of the Pacific Mail Line. This vessel 
is of 20,500 tons and is one of the largest 
ever entering the port. There is nothing 
pretty about her lines. She is a composite 
freight and passenger steamer and her pas- 
senger accommodations are amidships. No 
expense has been spared to make these as 
commodious and elegant as possible and 
many new features have been incorporated 
which will certainly prove a delight to the 
traveler. The Creole State has very large 
freight accommodations and has a refriger- 
ating plant. In a measure the vessel is an 
experiment, as it has been contended by men 
of experience in shipping circles that this 
kind of vessel -cannot be made a practical 
success in competition with the vessels on 
other lines which are devoted especially to 
passengers and which take freight only as a 
complement to their passenger load. These 
argue that the lack of speed of the freighter- 
passenger is an element against its success- 
fully competing with the passenger vessels 
of other lines. 



INSURANCE.— Allan, Acton and McDon- 
ald are said to have resigned the agency of 
the American Equitable. This resignation is 
effective March I . The firm expects to have 
two general agencies for the State in a short 
period of time. 

L. M. Hale has been made office manager 
of Edward Brown & Sons. This firm is in 
a new location — 154 Sansome street. Mr. 
Hale is well known in insurance circles and 
has been with the firm for more than ten 
years. Edward Brown & Sons have been ill 
business for forty-five years. It is one of 
the largest insurance firms on the Pacific 
Coast. 

Insurance men are watching Sacramento 
with a great deal of interest. A number of 
legislators have embryo laws in their pockets 
which may or may not be presented. Some 
are sure to see the light of day and it pays 
the man in insurance circles to watch that 
his interests and the interests of those he 
aims to protect are not sacrificed to the 
ambitions of pseudo statesmen. 

The Fire Underwriters' Association of the 
Pacific will have its annual meeting in San 
Francisco on February 9. Former National 
Fire Prevention Association President Wil- 
liam H. Merrill of Chicago and Secretary 



Franklin H. Wentworth will speak at this 
gathering. Incidentally to his visit, Mr. 
Merrill will look over the field of services of 
the Underwriters' Laboratories, of which he 
is the president. Secretary Wentworth will 
arrange for local headquarters here for the 
N. F. P. A., whose jubilee annual meeting 
will be held in San Francisco June 14-16. 

MINING. — There is a very generally dif- 
fused better feeling among mine operators. 
Developments in nearly every field where 
stocks of the companies operating are quoted 
on San Francisco exchanges are favorable. 
Those who know what is going on are pre- 
dicting a very active season of operations in 
the mines, not only in Nevada, but in Cali- 
fornia. Several of the old mines in Cali- 
fornia are showing up under modern 
methods of management as good producers. 
In Nevada interest centers about Tonopah 
and the Divides. 



WILL MEET LOCAL MANUFACTURERS 

Consul Richardson, at Karachi, India, 
writes that an American engineer, Mr. Thad. 
Avery, Jr., located at Srinagar, Kashmir, 
expects to visit the United States and desires 
to meet and discuss with American manu- 
facturers questions having to do with the 
extension of American trade with India, par- 
ticularly in machinery and metal lines. Mr. 
Avery expects to be in San Francisco about 
March I. 



We Specialize in 

Broken Hills Stock 

Now Selling at Bottom 

And other 

Adive Nevada 
Minin g Issues 

Listed on the 

San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Your business and inquiries solicited 



G. E. Arrowsmith & Co. 

Members S. F. Stock Exchange 



117 Russ Bldg. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



January 22, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



Misuse of Schools 



BUSY CITIZENS who have no time to 
think it over themselves, are asking 
"What is the matter with the world, 
these days?" Anybody who would give ten 
minutes serious thought to the subject would 
know that the world is most in need of a 
Fool-killing Bureau. 

We should have an important annex of 
the Bureau in San Francisco, with all the 
necessary apparatus for torture or execution 
on the second floor, half way between the 
Board of Education and the Board of Super- 
visors. It is hard to say which needs the 
most vigorous attention. One day we think 
'tis the Supervisors; the next day the Board 
of Education wins by a mile in the race to 
the Home for the Feeble-minded. 

This week the Educators (God save the 
mark) are in fine form for the Fool-killer. 
They want to have permission granted all the 
cranks, crooks, anarchists and bums to use 
public school buildings as "Community 
centers." 

If Mayor Rolph had a grain of sense he 
would take the Board of Education by the 
scruff of the neck and send them out to get 
jobs in a canning factory. 

School auditoria as community centers! 
Think of that! Our town is cursed already 
with tireless gabsmiths, holding meetings and 
getting their names in the papers, so as to 
corral some political job. 

Honest and industrious citizens do not 
need "Community Centers" in school build- 
ings. Such worthy people are tired after 
their day's business and go to bed at a 
seasonable hour. An occasional visit to the 
movies is their limit, before turning in. 

What right has a Board of Education to 
use public property for purposes to which 
il is not legally dedicated? Schools are not 
public halls. The taxpayers did not pay 
their good money to have schools turned into 
political bear-bits, piece-clubs, or terpsi- 
chorean chicken-roosts. Schools have a 
serious purpose. To make them temples of 
education by day and temples of Bacchus or 
Venus, or hotbeds of anarchy by night, is 
not within the province of the Board of 
Education. 

And are the unfortunate taxpayers sup- 
posed to have the added costs of these 
"Community Centers" tacked on to their 
already overswollen bills? Will the sagacious 
and liberal members of the Board of Educa- 
tion donate part of their salaries for the 
lights, and the increased janitor service, and 
wear and tear of the buildings? 

Il is because of just such wrong-headed 
municipal government as this that San Fran- 
cisco is receeding to the grade of a county 



of the second class and losing a senator and 
an assemblyman, while Los Angeles acquires 
several additional legislators. 

Haven't we stood this kind of thing long 
enough? Why don't we start up that agita- 
tion for a new charter and get rid of all the 
rubbish and rats in our municipal garret? 



AS PARIS SEES IT 

In Paris the housing crisis is as acute as 
in San Francisco or New York. One obtains 
some idea of the conditions in Paris from 
newspaper articles like that written in the 
Paris Journal of December 9 last, by 
Clement Vautel, a famous writer of 
Feuilletons. 

A former concierge of the Palace of 
Fontainebleau, one Victor Woegete, having 
south lodging for several weeks in Paris, 
found a resting place by the desperate expe- 
dient of suicide. Quoting M. Clement 
Vautel in Le Journal: 

That proves it will be useless for 
would-be tenants to insert in the news- 
papers this announcement: 

I shall kill myself, if I cannot 
find vacant apartment, three rooms 
and kitchen. Notice to philan- 
thropic proprietors. 
That supreme appeal will rest with- 
out echo, for there is not any to let. 
The housing crisis has become in Paris 
the most dangerous of all, and God 
knows we have had various. There is 
choice of but two remedies. 
First : to construct. 
Second : empty Paris. 
But nobody wishes to build and no- 
body desires to depart from the city. 
Certain hotel keepers, with leases 
dating back before the war. have 
doubled, tripled and quadrupled the 
rent of their dirty lodgings and made 
sleep a luxury which many cannot 
afford. 

Monsieur Vautel suggests that the logical 
end of such a condition will be a heap of 
straw in some corner into which one can 
crawl. Paris, at present, cannot be the 
loveliest place in the world for a traveler of 
limited means. 



DECLINE OF OUR INDIAN TRADE 

American export trade with India is at 
the moment faced with an almost inevitable 
curtailment. India's buying having declined 
lo the limit of present urgent necessity. In 
the twelve months ended March 31. 1920. 
India imported from the Lnited States mer- 
chandise of a total value of $81,967,412. 
compared with $52,386,338 for the fiscal 



year 1918-19, and $38,323,905 for 1917- 
1918. 

With the exception of Great Britain, 
America was India's most important pur- 
chasing market in the 1919-20 period, a dis- 
tinction held by Japan for the two years 
preceding. Today, however, the prospect is 
that the current fiscal year's total will be less 
than the high figure recorded at the close of 
last March. The reason for the anticipated 
decrease will be found in the depreciation of 
the rupee in its relation to the dollar. 



HONORED BY FRANCE 

The president of the French Republic has 
just accorded the Cross of the Legion of 
Honor to the City of Belgrade. The presi- 
dential decree is in the following terms: 

"The City of Belgrade was one of the first 
and most illustrious victims of the great war. 
Though the town was bombarded and occu- 
pied by the enemy it did not cease to give 
proofs of bravery without stint. The city 
was a magnificent symbol, first of resistance, 
and then of the victory of a heroic nation 
resolved not to perish." 

This declaration will be solemnly con- 
ferred upon the City of Belgrade by Gen- 
eral Franchet d'Esperey, former commander- 
in-chief of the Army of the Orient. 

After Liege, Belgrade was the second for- 
eign city to receive his distinction. 



SPEEDY END FOR INCORRIGIBLES 

In his valuable message to the legislature, 
Governor Olcott makes a number of interest- 
ing suggestions that he hopes to see incor- 
porated in laws. One of these has to do 
with the treatment of habitual criminals. In 
the opinion of Governor Olcott, "after a man 
has twice served sentences in a penitentiary 
on felony charges, and for a third time has 
been convicted for the commission of a 
felony," he is a habitual criminal, "beyond 
hope of reform," and "society should be pro- 
tected against the confirmed and incorrig- 
ible" felon. The governor thinks "that if 
two terms in the penitentiary cannot reform 
a man, he is incorrigible and beyond the 
hope of reformation, and the proper place 
for him is in close restriction, behind prison 
bars, where he is no longer a menace to 
society and no longer jeopardizes human 
life." Governor Olcott recommends the 
adoption by Oregon of a law similar to that 
of Washington, where habitual criminals are 
imprisoned for life. 

Governor Olcott now holds views similar to 
those frequently expressed by The Spec- 
tator: That society has the right to, and 
should protect itself against the habitual 
criminal. But the measure of protection sug- 
gested by the governor is inadequate, ex- 
pensive, and cruel. The habitual felon 
whose incorrigibility yields neither to the 
force of punitive sentence nor to the suasion 
of reformatory kindness, should be put to 
death. — -The Spectator. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




ociot 




— The marriage of Mrs. Caroline Thorn- 
ton Oxnard, widow of Mr. James G. Oxnard 
of California, to Mr. Arthur C. Carson of 
Butte, Montana, took place last week in the 
East and the couple are coming to California 
on their wedding trip. The wedding was 
celebrated at the home of the bride, at St. 
James, Long Island, in the presence of a 
few friends and relatives. Mr. Robert G. 
Oxnard is her brother-in-law, and Mr. Ben- 
jamin and Mr. Henry Oxnard of New York 
and Washington, are also brothers of her 
first husband. 

— Announcement has been made of the 
marriage of Miss Elinor Talbot, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. C. F. A. Talbot of Woodside. 
to Commander Henry D. Cooke, U. S. N., 
the wedding having taken place at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Mackintosh at 
Bronxville, N. Y., on January 4. The bride 
was attended by Mrs. Mackintosh as matron 
of honor, and Miss Vera Talbot of San 
Mateo as bridesmaid. The ushers included 
four Navy officers and four of the civilian 
friends of the bridegroom. Rev. Dr. Cobb 
of New York officiated. Commander and 
Mrs. Cooke have gone to Bermuda on their 
honeymoon and upon their return will make 
their home in Bronxville. 

— Miss Hannah Hobart, whose engage- 
ment to Leonard Morton Prince of Chicago 
was recently announced, was guest of honor 
at a luncheon which Miss Sara Coffin gave 











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Monday at the San Francisco Golf and 
Country Club. The guests included: Mes- 
dames J. H. P. Howard. Jr., Edward Clark. 
Jr.; Misses Mary Donahue, Ruth Hobart, 
Emilita Timlow, Barbara Donahue, Sophie 
Beylard. 

— An unusually interesting trip has been 
planned by Mr. and Mrs. John H. Rosseter 
and a party of friends. They left here on 
Tuesday in a private car for Mexico. From 
there they will go to Washington and then 
to Baltimore. They will sail from Baltimore 
on the new liner Golden State for Cuba and 
Panama and will then return to San Fran- 
cisco through the canal. It is the maiden 
trip of the steamer, which was christened by 
Mrs. Rosseter. In the party to Mexico were 
Mr. William H. Crocker, Mr. William W. 
Crocker, Mr. Samuel F. B. Morse and Mr. 
Elmer Dover. A large party of San Fran- 
ciscans will join the Rosseters in Baltimore 
and will sail on the White Seal on February 
15, arriving here on March 4. Among them 
will be Mr. and Mrs. Georges de Latour, Mr. 
and Mrs. William T. Sesnon and the Misses 
Barbara and {Catherine Sesnon and Porter 
Sesnon, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph T. Grace and 
Miss Geraldine Grace, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
C. Moore and Miss Josephine Moore, Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Fay, Mr. James F. Fagan 
and his daughter, Miss Doris Fagan. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Rawlings have re- 
turned to San Francisco to live after a long 
residence in Lima, Peru. For the past few 
months Mr. and Mrs. Rawlings have been in 
New York. They returned here Sunday and 
are at the home of Mrs. Rawlings' mother, 
Mrs. Alexander Warner, in Franklin street. 

— Miss Hannah Hobart, whose engage- 
ment to Mr. Leonard Prince of Chicago has 
been announced, was the guest for whom her 
aunt, Mrs. Alexander Lilley, gave a tea last 
week at her apartment at Stanford Court. 
Miss Hobart and her sister, Miss Ruth Ho- 
bart, and Miss Ethel Lilley assisted in re- 
ceiving. 

— Myron T. Herrick and his son and 
daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Parmley W. 
Herrick, who have been visiting for several 
days in San Francisco, sailed Wednesday 
morning on the Wilhelmina for Honolulu. 
During their visit they have been guests at 
the Fairmont hotel. Mr. and Mrs. John 
Drum entertained at dinner in honor of the 
visitors Tuesday evening, the affair having 
taken place at the John Drum home in Bur- 
lingame. 

— Miss Constance Beardsley was hostess 
at a musicale and tea at her apartments on 



January 22, 1921 

Broadway, Sunday afternoon. Miss Beards- 
ley was assisted by Miss Frances Lent, Miss 
Florence Veach and Miss Geraldine Grace. 

— Mrs. Nion Tucker has returned after a 
brief visit in the East. 

— Mr. ana Mrs. George Pope returned last 
week from New York, and are at their home 
in town. They will be there until the early 
spring, when they will go to their Burlin- 
game place. Mrs. Pope has been in New 
York most of the winter, and Mr. Pope 
jointed her there for Christmas. 

— Mrs. William B. Tubbs gave a tea on 
Wednesday for Mrs. William F. Timlow, of 
New York, who is here visiting her mother 
and sister, Mrs. James Carolan and Miss 
Emily Carolan. Mrs. Timlow will be remem- 
bered as Miss Evelyn Carolan, one of the 
most beautiful girls in San Francisco society. 
Mrs. Tubbs invited about fifty of her old 
friends to meet her at tea on Wednesday. 
Miss Emelie Tubbs and Miss Emily Timlow 
poured tea. 

— Miss Ruth and Miss Mary Davis gave 
a luncheon at the Palace for the Misses 
Katherine and Barbara Sesnon, two of this 
winter's debutantes, who are soon going 
East. The other guests were Miss Katherine 
Bentley, Miss Frances Lent, Miss Geraldine 
Grace, Miss Helen Brack, Mrs. Theodore 
Rethers, Jr., Miss Elizabeth Terry, Miss 
Margaret Buckbee, Miss Doris Fagan, Miss 
Elizabeth Magee, Mrs. Ream Black and Miss 
Gladys Little. 

— Miss Minnie Houghton and Miss Lily 
O'Connor have returned from Southern Cali- 
fornia, where they went on a motor trip. 
They spent Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. 
William H. McKittrick at Bakersfield, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Edward White were 
also there over the holidays. 

— Three of the debutantes of this side of 
the bay. Miss Barbara and Miss Katherine 
Sesnon and Miss Margaret Buckbee, were 

Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 











Business 

is a gigantic organization, 
kept alive and active by trade 
coursing through its veins. 
Your livelihood and prosperity 
are bound up in the livelihood 
and prosperity of other men. 
When trade stops circulating, 
business dies. No man's trade 
can flourish in splendid isola- 
tion. And trade circulates 
only by immediate buying. 

Willard's 

Geary Street 

Between Grant and Stockton 











January 22, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



guests for whom Miss Elizabeth Moore gave 
a luncheon yesterday at her home in Pied- 
mont. She was assisted in receiving by her 
mother, Mrs. Walton Moore. Other guests 
were debutantes of San Francisco and Oak- 
land. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hamilton gave 
a dinner Monday as a farewell to Mrs. Wil- 
liam S. Porter, who is going to Europe. It 
took place at the home of Mrs. Hamilton's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. John D. Spreckels in 
Pacific avenue, where the Hamiltons are 
spending the winter. 

— Miss Mary and Miss Barbara Donohoe 
gave a tea on Friday for Miss Hannah Ho- 
bart. The Donohoes are occupying the 
Lansdale house on Broadway this winter and 
the tea took place there. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edward Pringle gave an 
informal dinner recently at their home in 
Pacific avenue and entertained Dr. and Mrs. 
Grant Selfridge, Dr. and Mrs. Henry Kier- 
sted and Mr. and Mrs. Atholl McBean. 

— Mr. Ralston White will leave for the 
East the end of this month and will join Mrs. 
White, who has been in New York several 
weeks. They will sail soon for Europe and 
will first go to the Mediterranean and after 
a visit to Egypt will tour Italy. Later they 
will go to Paris and will make a long stay 
there. They will return to California in the 
late summer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Georges de Latour have 
returned to town from their country place 
at Rutherford, where they spent a few days. 
The de Latours gave a dinner Monday even- 
ing at their home on Broadway and had 
among their guests Mr. and Mrs. John 
Rosseter, Mr. and Mrs. William T. Sesnon 
and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fay. 

— The members of the Auxiliary of the 
Children's Hospital met Monday at the St. 
Francis and made further arrangements for 
the Mardi Gras ball at the Civic Auditorium, 
February 8. At the meeting were Mrs. 
Charles Templeton Crocker. Mrs. Walter S. 
Martin, Mrs. Henry Kiersted, Mrs. Andrew 
Welch, Mrs. Latham McMullin. Mrs. Harry 
Scott, Mrs. Norris Davis, Mrs. Horace Hill. 
Mrs. Laurence Irving Scott, Miss Emily 
Carolan, Mrs. Will Taylor, Mrs. Samuel 
Boardman. Costumes of all kinds are being 
designed for the ball and it is expected that 
it will be more attractive than ever. 

— Miss Cecile Broke gave a luncheon 
Monday for Miss Frances Lent. Several 
other debutantes were there. In the party 
were Miss Geraldine Grace. Miss Barbara 
and Miss (Catherine Sesnon. Miss Margaret 
Bruckbee. Miss Laura Miller, Miss Jane Car- 
rigan. Miss Helen Brack, Miss Kathenne 
Mohun. Miss Elizabeth Magee and Mix 
(Catherine Bentley. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William H. Crocker gave 
a large dinner a few evenings ago for the 
I. ountess de Buyer who. was Miss Daisy 



Polk, and who is in San Mateo visiting her 
brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. 
Willis Polk. Several other entertainments 
have been given in Burlingame and San 
Mateo for the Countess since her arrival 
from France. 

— Miss Margaret Buckbee gave a tea on 
Friday at her home in Pacific avenue. The 
principal guests were three debutantes. Miss 
Geraldine Grace and the Misses Barbara and 
Katherine Sesnon, who will soon leave for 
the East. 

— Mr. Richard Magee left a few days ago 
for the East to enter a preparatory school. 
He spent the Christmas holidays with his 
mother, Mrs. Walter Hobart, and Mr. Hobart 
at their place in San Mateo. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Frederick J. Koster gave 
a dinner Wednesday evening at their home 
on Commonwealth avenue and had as guests 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Boardman, Mr. and 
Mrs. George Chauncey Boardman, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Fay. 

— Captain and Mrs. William C. Van 
Antwerp (Edith Chesebrough) have returned 
from Del Monte after passing their honey- 
moon at the Clark villa at Pebble Beach. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton ar- 
rived from Honolulu on Tuesday. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Jackling gave 
a dinner Sunday evening for Mrs. William S. 
Porter, who is being constantly entertained 
before her departure for Europe. Others 
at the dinner were Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Bosqui, Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Allen, and 
Messrs. Philip Paschel. Alfred Holmes and 
Robert Henderson. 

— Mrs. Adrian Applegarth gave a tea 
Monday for Mrs. Patricia O'Connor Hen- 
shaw, who is here on a visit from Los 
Angeles, where she has lived for the past two 
years, and for Mrs. Paul Butte, who will 
leave on February 4 for Honolulu. During 
the afternoon Mrs. Henshaw read a play. 
She is very talented with much dramatic 
ability and a charming singing voice. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hill will soon leave 
for New York, to spend several weeks. They 
recently moved into their new house at 
Broadway and Webster street, and while 
they are in New York will buy some of the 
decorations. 

— Mrs. Russell Cool's friends are much 
concerned over her serious illness. She is 
at the Stanford University Hospital. Her 
daughter has arrived from Texas, to be 
near her mother, and is visiting Mr. and Mrs. 
Mark Gerstle. 



— Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Norris gave a 
dinner Wednesday evening at the Fairmont 
and had as guests Mr. and Mrs. Dean Witter, 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Thompson, Mr. and 
Mrs. Roy R. Somers and Mr. and Mrs. 
James Jenkins. 



THE RENDEZVOUS OF THE EPICUREAN 

Where can one find a more unique pro- 
gram of entertainment and amusement than 
at the divertisement of hilarity offerings pro- 
duced every evening at the famous Techau 
Tavern? The gorgeous gowns, the beautiful 
girls, the wonderful orchestra and its still 
more wonderful music, for dancing, and of 
course, the Lucky Dances with attractive 
boxes of Murad cigarettes and Miss Saylor's 
famous chocolates, delightful gifts for the 
lucky winners, and in addition to all this, 
when the menu offers such delightful, appe- 
tizing dishes, products of the State's best in 
the abundance of the river, the orchard, and 
the farm, prepared in a manner which makes 
San Francisco the attractive goal of all bon 
vivants, what could one wish for that would 
in any way approach this bountiful offering 
of both entertainment and unusual res- 
taurant dishes. The Saturday afternoon 
dancing during tea also finds great favor 
among the shoppers who find it an excellent 
relaxation in the afternoon. 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

Gus' Fashion 

The MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT 

65 Post Slreet. Near Market Slreel. 

Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco. Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carle. Also Regular 

French and Italian Dinners. 

FISH AND CAME A SPECIALTY 



Treatments 



Mr. & Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove 

SPECIALIZE IN 

Hair 
Face 
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You hare scientific care at 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

Kearny 2842 San Francisco. 

Berkeley Store 233 I Telegraph 




Would Yon Preserve Your Lustrous Eyes? 

Use Murine Eye Remedy 

No Dressing Table Complete Without 
9«. UVE Murine As An Eye Tonic liquid 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22, 1921 



^ttotnohjlo 




How to Lubricate Cylinders 

First and foremost, use good oil. All the 
conditions are not necessarily satisfied if the 
quality is good, because viscosity and flash- 
point are alsi essential. Unless you know 
more about lubrication than the makers of 
your car, we suggest that their recommen- 
dations be followed as to the grade of engine 
oil to use in winter and in summer. 

At intervals drain off the oil from the 
crank case or reservoir, flush out with kero- 
sene or gasoline if you have reason to think 
the case is dirty, and then put in clean oil. 
Of course it is not necessary to drain the 
crank case every time fresh oil is added to 
the lubricating system. 

Whenever a quart or so of fresh oil is 
supplied let a teaspoonful of Dixon's Motor 
Graphite be inhaled through the air intake 
of the carburetor. This must be done while 
the engine is running at good speed in order 
to draw the graphite into the cylinders. The 
simplest method is to place graphite on a 
sheet of folded paper and hold it close to 
the air intake, being careful that the 
graphite is not blown away by the fan. Tt 
is not necessary that the introduction of 
graphite to the cylinders be coincidental 
with the addition of fresh oil, but that is 
about the right frequency. 

Do not use more graphite than is recom- 
mended. Better use none than too much. 
A small amount is sufficient to keep your 
motor young. 

* * * 

The Care of the Magneto 

The care of the magneto may be summed 
up in the three following injunctions: 
I. Lubricate; 2, Keep clean; 3, Keep dry. 

1 . Lubricate. There are two bearings 
for the armature and one for the distributor. 
One drop in each oil lead every 1000 miles 
(or once a week) is all the manufacturer 
advises. Use the regular cylinder oil in your 
oil can. If more oil is used it will be apt 
to spatter and cause a short circuit in the dis- 
tributor, or get on the breaker points and 
prevent the primary current from flowing. 

2. Keep Clean. There are four places 
needing attention: the distributor (outside 
and inside), the circuit-breaker points, the 
collector ring, and the safety spark gap. 
At least once a month the first two should 
be cleaned and the others inspected. Dust 
accumulates on the distributor-head and a 
short-circuit, allowing the high-tension cur- 



rent to leak, will be shown by the spark 
jumping. But a leak inside cannot be seen, 
so any accumulation of dust must be wiped 
out with a cloth dipped in gasoline. 

Sfi Sf, !{, 

Don't Splash Mud 

Have you ever waited at a curb to let an 
automobile pass, only to have the driver go 
by at full speed and throw mud and dirty 
water all over you from a puddle in his 
path? 

There are occasionally times when a 
motorist may not be held responsible for a 
mishap of this sort, yet it cannot be denied 
that this is one offense for which the driver 
seldom has any justification. A slight turn 
of the wheel could nearly always keep the 
wheels out of the puddle, or a slight reduc- 
tion in speed would make it possible to get 
through without splashing. 

Roamer a Roomy Car 

As the larger models of the new Roamer 
closed cars are turned out the beauty of our 
new closed car line is more fully revealed. 

Every inch of the space made available 
by the extra long (138 inch) wheel base has 
been fully taken advantage of in laying out 
the design of the roomy body. As a result 
there is plenty of leg room in the driver's 
compartment and comfortable seating ca- 
pacity in both the rear seat and the folding 
auxiliary seats. 

The treatment of the top is carried out in 
the same manner as in the new coupe with 
a little more arch because of its greater 
length. It is the graceful curve of the top 
with its sloping eave which emphasizes the 
long, low sweep of horizontal body lines and 



secures the perfect balance of the new closed 
models. 

Those who prefer an especially large and 
roomy car will find that the Roamer seven- 
passenger sedan very comfortably accommo- 
dates seven passengers and at the same time 
retains a beauty of line not found in other 
cars of its size. 

Treatment of Cuts 

The careful car owner, and the one whose 
tire bills are kept at a minimum is the one 
who examines his tires at frequent intervals 
and removes such foreign matter as tacks, 
bits of nails, glass and other tiny matter 
which looks innocent enough but which, if 
allowed to remain imbeded in the tread, will 
in time cause serious trouble. The tire should 
be washed before it is examined and as soon 
as a cut is discovered it should be carefully 
washed out with a brush and a little gasoline 
in order to remove all dirt and grit. This 
acts as a sort of antiseptic. Obtain a good 
grade of cement and plastic rubber of which 
there are several excellent brands. Swab 
the inside of the cut with the cement and 
allow it to partly dry, which takes but a few 
minutes. Then apply the cement again. 
This time do not wait until it is thoroughly 
dry but when it becomes tacky push in the 
opening a little more of the plastic rubber 
than is necessary to fill the hole. Be sure 
to press it down as tightly as possible. This 
will dry and virtually become a part of the 
tire. It will prevent moisture or dirt from 
entering and ruining the casing, just as a 
filling in a tooth when a defect is first dis- 
covered will obviate the necessity of a visit 
to the dentist for its early extraction. 
* * * 

Change Tires 

It is a very good plan to change the tires 
on the cars from time to time, that is, to 
practice tire rotation. It is a well known 
fact that the tires on the right side of the car 
get the most wear. The reason for this is 
obvious. The rules of the road compel us 
to keep to the right. Hence in the cities the 
right-hand tires are being continually rubbed 
against the curb, and on the highways the 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



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61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



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CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



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ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



January 22, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



right-hand wheels always are in the chopped 
up part of the road, especially when turning 
out to allow others to pass. It is therefore 
only fair to change them from side to side 
and by the same token to move the rear tires 
up front when new ones are purchased. 

The front tires are being pushed along the 
road and last much longer than the rear 
ones. In changing tires from one side to the 
other it also is well to permit that which for- 
merly was the outside or the side furthest 
from the car to become the inside or the side 
nearest the car. 

Electrical Trouble 

When one is confronted with electrical 
troubles, it is necessary, first of all, to segre- 
gate the cause. The symptoms when studied 
will indicate the approximate position. For 
instance, when one cylinder is missing, it is 
evident that the trouble affects the H. T. 
system, between the distributor and the plug, 
as if it was in the low tension, the car would 
stop entirely, or fire at intervals, in any 
cylinder, impartially. It is seldom in the dis- 
tributor, as the current is of such high volt- 
age as to easily penetrate a thin film of oil 
which might lodge on one of the segments, 
though this might cause trouble. 

To locate the cylinder at fault: Idle the 
engine and short circuit each plug in turn. 
Each time a good cylinder is shorted, the 
engine will slow down, though no change 
will be noticeable when the faulty plug is 
shorted. First clean the plug and adjust the 
points to about 1-16 inch, though smaller 
gap should be allowed for magneto ignition 
than for battery. 

It may be necessary to change the plug, 
as in some cases the porcelain or mica in- 
sulation becomes spongy and electricity 
easily penetrates to ground without jumping 
the gap; also lift the wire clear of any parts 
of the engine through which the current 
might jump to ground through faulty 
insulation. 

Another trouble which will affect one cyl- 
inder only is electro-static action between 
one wire and a neighboring one causing an 
explosion in the cylinder when on the induc- 
tion stroke. This is indicated by backfires 
through carburetor, though backfires are 
caused by several other things. To remedy 
this, move the suspected wire as far away 
from the others as possible. Segregation is 
the only remedy for this, as a perfectly 
insulated wire is as subject to it as a poorly 
insulated one. 

* * * 

Storage Battery 
The storage battery demands its share of 
attention. The greater use of lights during 
the short days and the longer time the starter 
has to run before the engine fires put a 
heavy drain on the capacity of the battery. 
This latter should be tested more frequently, 
filled more regularly, and taken out for re- 



charging at the moment its reading falls be- 
low 1.175. The biggest rush of current is 
required at starting — this may momentarily 
be 200 to 500 amperes — and anything that 
lessens this load has a beneficial effect on the 
battery. 

In the case of a cold car, if the driver 
will take the crank and turn the engine a 
dozen times, he will break the grip of the 
cold oil on a score of bearings so that the 
starter doesn't have to do this heavy work; 
then when the button is pushed, the engine 
turns as easily as in normal temperatures 
and the battery is greatly relieved — also 
there is not the possibility of stalling or of 
bending the pinion end of the starter shaft, 
which often occurs when the engine sticks 
and the starter is forced. 

Years ago everybody knew about the use 
of hydrometers in testing gasoline and the 
early motorists scorned gasoline that read as 
low as 79 — let them try it now and they will 
find most of the "gasoline" reads around 58. 

This poorer gasoline is so much less vola- 
tile that it is well nigh impossible to start a 
car on some of it in cold weather. There is, 
however, quite a big difference in the gravity 
of the gas as sold by different dealers and 
distributed by different oil companies. The 
best plan is to buy a gasoline hydrometer 
and go around to a number of places and 
make a test, then to buy that which shows 
the highest; this shows about what is the 
best grade in the market and what to hold 
out for in buying — and the greater ease of 
starling will amply pay for the initial effort, 
while the price of all grades will be found 
uniform (nearly) in any locality. 

Use Low Gear on Hills 
An experienced truck driver puts his 



engine in low gear before starting down a 
steep or long hill. The inexperienced driver 
thinks that he needs only to shut off the 
power and "let her roll." When he wishes 
to slacken the speed of his truck he locks 
the emergency brake, with the result that if 
the hill is long the emergency brakes burn 
out. In order to be on the safe side a 
driver operating over unfamiliar roads 
should, especially if his truck is loaded, start 
down a hill only after he has put his gears 
in second speed. Later, should he find the 
hill to be long and steep, he can, without 
burning up his brakes, slacken speed suf- 
ficiently to shift into low speed. Then, by 
using his brakes intelligently, he has full 
control over the speed of his truck. 

No Storage Battery 

Any automobile may be operated without 
the storage battery and without damaging 
any of the units if the wires leading to the 
generator brushes are disconnected, or if 
the blushes are removed entirely. In such 
cases ignition current may be had by con- 
necting four dry cells in series in place of 
the storage battery. Never operate the car 
without the storage battery unless the 
brushes are disconnected or removed. 



FEW PEOPLE SEE RADIUM 

Radium is a metal with a white metallic 
luster. Few persons have seen it. Ordinarily 
it is obtained from its ores in the form of 
sulphate, chloride, or bromide. It is in the 
form of those salts that it is usually sold and 
used. These are all white or nearly white 
substances, whose appearance is no more 
remarkable than that of common salt or 
baking powder. Tubes containing radium 
salts glow mostly because they include im- 
purities which the radiations from the 
radium cause to give light. 



POLICYHOLDERS SURPLUS $4,312,904.00 

EARTHQUAKE - FIRE - AUTOMOBILE 

YOU LIVE IN UNITED STATES 
INSURE IN UNITED STATES 

United States Fire Insurance Co. 



Pacific Department 

266 Bush St., S. F. 



INCORPORATED 1824 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Harold Junker 

Manager 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Co. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 

TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22, 1921 



PI/EASURDS WAND 



"Obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS 
Orpheum's New Bill 

The De Wolf girls, Georgette and Capi- 
tola, ranked among the cleverest sister teams 
in vaudeville, will come to the Orpheum next 
week in "A Love Tour," which depicts a 
sentimental journey of song, dance, gowns, 
and scenery reaching Madrid, Tokio, Paris, 
Moscow, Cons' antinople and home again. 
James F. Conlin and Myrtle Glass, pro- 
gressive vaud;villians, are to furnish their 
newest act, called "The Four Seasons" and 
"The Four Reasons." Joe Laurie, Jr., "the 
Pint Size Comedian," will present as his 
amusement offering, "Whatlcare." Jimmy 
Lucas will appear with Francerne in "Vam- 
pires and Fools." Wm. Selbini and Jeanette 
Grovini will answer the query, "What are 
the Follies of Vaudeville?" Herbert's loop 
the loop and leaping canines will include 
more than a dozen dogs and a number of 
cats, .pigeons and roosters. George Mac- 
Farlane, the famous baritone, will remain 
one more week, as will Frances Pritchard, 
with Edward Tierney and James Donnelly in 
the "Dance Duel." 



Next "Popular" Concert 

The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
under the direction of Alfred Hertz will give 
its regular "Popular" concert in the Curran 
Theatre next Sunday afternoon, offering a 
program made up mostly of well known 
favorites. The principal items listed are the 
"Alsacian Scenes" of Massenet and the 
Dream Pantomime from Humperdinck's 
"Hansel and Gretel." Other numbers will 
be Maillart' overture to "Les Dragons des 
Villars," two of Greig's Norwegian Dances, 
the "Prelude" of Jarnefelt, Grainger's Irish 
Tune from County Derry, and Molly on the 
Shore, and Wagner's overture to "Tann- 
hauser." 

For the pair of symphony concerts to be 
given next Friday and Sunday afternoons 
the program will contain two numbers new 
to San Francisco. They are the overture to 
"Russian and Ludmilla" of Glinka and 
Dohnanyi's Suite, Opus 19. The second half 
of the program will consist of Schumann's 
first symphony in B Flat major, known as 
the "Spring" symphony. 

Alcazar 

"The Wonderful Thing" with its resist- 
less heart appeal, at the Alcazar this week, 
gives place next Sunday matinee to the first 
local staging of Oliver Morosco's latest farci- 
cal frivolity "Marry the Poor Girl," that 
recently convulsed New Yorkers at Winthrop 
Ames' Little Theatre. It is by Owen Davis, 
whose "Sinners," "At 9:45" and "Peggy 
Behave" have registered popular hits at the 




DE WOLF C1RLS 
In "A Love Tour" at the Orpheum !\'ext Week. 




^ Oy?W^(Ioiaux t ■ 



Next Week— Starting Sunday 



De Wolf Girls 

in "A LOVE TOUR" 



Conlin & Glass 

SEASONS and REASONS 



JORGE MAC FARLANEI FRANCES PRITCHARD 



Jimmy Lucas 

"Vampires and Fools' 



TOPICS OF DAY 



The Pint Size Author Comedian 

Joe Laurie, Jr. 

Presenting "WHATICARE" 



Matlnees-2ac to $1.00 Evenings— 2.ic to SI 50 

MATINEE DAILY-Phone Douglas 70 

Scalpers' Tickets Not Honored 



' 1""""oB A I C^ A 7 A P 

vnN„ U t,*«u. t "■ *» L-» v_> r\ L-i r\ IV 



THIS WEEK— A Delightful Comedy 

"THE WONDERFUL THING" 

WEEK COM. NEXT SUN. MAT.. JAN. 23 

Oliver Morosco's Recenl New York Hit, an 

Uproariously Funny. Wholesome Frivolity 

"MARRY THE POOR GIRL" 

By Owen Davis, Author "Peggy Behave. "Sinners." 

"At 9:34." and other Popular Plays 

NEW ALCAZAR COMPANY 

DUDLEY AYRES-ELWYN HARVEY 

SUNDAY MAT.. JAN. 30-First Time Here 

Alice Brady's Latest New York Success 

"ANNA ASCENDS" 

Romance of a Syrian Girl Waitress who Ascended 

to American Literary Fame 

Comedy— Pathos— Dramatic Thrill 

Every Evening. Mats. Sun., Thurs., Sal. 



SLRtN'l A I'iROYINI | HERBERT'S CANINES 



ORCHESTRA 



January 22, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



Alcazar. It is a farce of a week-end party, 
screamingly funny without suggestiveness in 
speech or situation. The wedding ceremony 
with the two fiancees as witnesses is a 
shriek. Dudley Ayres and Elwyn Harvey 
are the harrassed and unwilling bridal 
couple, and other Alcazarans, always adept 
in light comedy, are Emelie Melville, Emily 
Pinter, Gladys Emmons, Edna Peckham, Ben 
Erway, Rafael Brunetto, Charles Yule, Al 
Cunningham, Walter Emerson and Frederick 
Green. 

"Anna Ascends," for the first time here 
Sunday, January 30, is the romance of a 
girl from the Balkans, passionate in devo- 
tion to her adopted America, whose ascen- 
sion takes her from waitress in a Turkish 
coffee house, to fame and riches as a popu- 
lar author. 



California Theatre 

"There's a reason" for the enormous 
crowds of pleasure-seekers that fill this beau- 
tiful theatre and overflow onto the sidewalk. 
The "piece de resistance" is always a play 
of quality and interest to appeal to the taste 
of the discriminating public; the musical 
numbers are well chosen and excellently ren- 
dered; the News Events feature shows hap- 
penings all over the world. 



Amusing Comedy at Maitland 

"The Perplexed Husband" is keeping the 
patrons of the little Stockton playhouse 
amused this week. The plot of Alfred 
Sutro's four-act play is well constructed and 
the Maitland players, headed by Mr. Mail- 
land himself, and Mary Morris, his leading 
lady, handle their roles cleverly. The Mait- 
land season is approaching its end, only two 
more performances. 



Classics at Columbia 

The season of Mr. Robert Mantell opened 
brilliantly on Monday evening with a fine 
performance of Bulwer-Lytton's "Richelieu" 
which furnished this powerful and versatile 
actor of another generation a part well 
suited to his talent. Hundreds were turned 
away at the doors, demonstrating that San 
Francisco loves a good actor and a good 
play as much as ever. 



Orpheum's Attractive Bill 

A well-assorted collection of the very best 
vaudevillians greets us this week, and we sit 
for a couple of hours under the magic of 
Mr. Bone's baton, laughing and applauding 
and feeling grateful in the careless way a 
spoiled Orpheum audience has of feeling, 
that we are indeed fortunate in our local 
music hall. 



Popular Play at Alcazar 

Lilian Bradley's drama "The Wonderful 
Thing" gives the Alcazar company full scope 
for its well known ability. The story is in- 



teresting and plot well sustained. Dudley 
Ayres is a young lawyer, Miss Harvey a 
young French-American girl, both well cast. 
Emily Melville has a part after her own heart 
— that of an aristocratic "grande dame" of 
the old school. 



hibits at that show will be a liberal education 
in automobile progress for all motorists and 
that means everybody. 



DINNER EXTRAORDINARY 

These days it is next to impossible to hear 
of such a thing as a wonderful dinner at a 
tariff less than moderate, but it can be had 
at Cafe Marquard. Every Thursday night 
they have a dinner for $2.50 a plate which 
makes epicures ask: "How can they do it?" 
But it's done and the well-pleased patrons 
come again, and keep coming. That is the 
test — satisfaction. This "diner extraordi- 
naire" is served from 6 to 9 p. m. and 
dancing and a musical entertainment accom- 
panies it. 

In the New Show, every evening now, 
springtime melodies are offered. Patricia 
Allen and Charlotte Dawn appear, and the 
famous orchestra, under the direction of Bert 
E. Fiske, contributes to the pleasure. 

The Business Men's lunch for 75 cents is 
very popular, and the Continental lunch for 
90 cents cannot be excelled. 



FAIRMONT ABREAST OF TIMES 

The guests of the Fairmont Hotel are for- 
tunate people in that they have not to wait 
for the long-expected reduction of the cost 
of living. Who could ask for anything better 
than the Club Breakfast, from 65 cents to 
$1.10? The table d'hote charges are even 
more attractive; lunch, $1.00; dinner, 
$2.00; Sunday dinner, $2.00. 

The Saturday dinner dance from 7 p. m. 
to midnight for $3.00 is a welcome feature. 
So is the fine string orchestra during lunch 
and dinner, and in the lobby. Mr. Rudy 
Seiger is music director. Manager Leroy 
Linnard is certainly keeping well abreast of 
the times at the beautiful Fairmont with its 
wonderful site. 



REMEMBER THE ACCESSORY SHOW 

Public interest in the Accessory Show at 
the Civic Auditorium, from January 22 lo 
27, continues to increase. To see the ex- 



POLO NEXT WEEK 

Society will be represented in force a week 
from this coming Saturday when the open- 
ing whistle of the California polo season is 
sounded at Del Monte. Players with their 
strings of speedy polo ponies are already 
commencing to arrive and by the time of 
the opening game it is expected that the side 
boards and grandstand at the Del Monte 
fields will be well filled with lively parlies. 



THE NEXT GREAT OIL BOOM WILL BE AT 
THE DOOR OF SAN FRANCISCO 

We have for sale a limited number of shares of the Sumac Oil 
Company, in the new Fresno Oil Field, at $1 par value, while they last. 

Sale of shares authorized by the 

STATE CORPORATION COMMISSIONER 

E. M. VAIL & CO., Fiscal Agents 



401-405 CLAUS SPRECKELS BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 











Chiropractic 
Oxygen Vapor 
UltraViolet Rays 

LADIES — I desire lo announce that I have secured the 
services of DR. \f.4LD PETERSOS. licensed by the Stale 
Board of Medical Examiners (February 16, 1907), to practice 
in the Sale of California. 

OSTEOPATHY 

Specialist in \r\ omen s and Children s Diseases. 


DR. GEO 

REGULARL 
Tubercular. Organic. Nervous. R 

Book. "DRUGLESS THE 
LADY ATTENDANTS 

335 Stockton Stre 


>. D. GILLESPIE 

i LICENSED DRUGLESS PHYSICIAN 
Klal. Colon. Prostatic, Chronic Skin and Scalp Diseases. My 
-RAPY." tells you why pressure on nerves causes disease. 
iElVD FOR IT. MAILED FREE 

CONSULTATION FREE 

et En^rMeL^ne^foor San Francisco 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22, 1921 



LIBRARY TABLE 



NORWAY'S LITERARY PLANET 

Knut Hamsun, the Norwegian novelist 
who has been awarded the Nobel Literary 
Prize, is now sixty. For years past he has 
been regarded as the greatest of living Nor- 
wegian writers. 

"Growth of the Soil" is Hamsun's latest 
work. As a boy he wrote verse under diffi- 
culties, working with a shoemaker for some 
years and saving up money for the publica- 
tion of his juvenile efforts. He had little 
education and went to Christiania with the 
object of studying there, but failed to make 
his way. Twice he essayed his fortune in 
America, but without success. For three 
years he worked as a fisherman on the New- 
foundland banks. 

His Nordland origin is in itself significant; 
it means an environment of month-long 
nights and concentrated summers, in which 
all feelings are intensified, and love and 
dread and gratitude and longing are nearer 
and deeper than in milder and more temper- 
ate regions, where elemental opposites are, 
as it were, reciprocally diluted. 

In 1890, at the a)ge of thirty, Hamsun 
attracted attention by the publication of 
"Suit" (Hunger). "Suit" is a record of 
weeks of starvation in a city; the semi- 
delirious confession of a man whose physi- 
cal and mental faculties have slipped beyond 
control. He speaks and acts irrationally, 
and knows it, watches himself at his mental 
antics and takes himself to task for the 
same. And he asks himself: Is in a sign of 
madness ? 

With the "Growth of the Soil" Hamsun 
achieves his greatest triumph. 

These are the steps of Hamsun's progress 
as an author, from the passionate chaos of 
'Suit" to the Miltonic, monumental calm of 
"Growth of the Soil." 



RED CROSS IN ITALY 

Of the various books that have been pub- 
lished to show the importance of American 
Red Cross work undertaken in the great war 
Charles M. Bakewell's story of the charitable 
organization's achievements in Italy, is per- 
haps the most important. Future historians 
will look carefully for all data relative to 
the entry of Italy into the world war and 
how the war spirit was set aflame and how 
sustained. Italy had experienced two years 
of fighting before a serious effort was made 
to convince the Italians that America was 
with them in the struggle. Published by the 
Macmillan Company. 



as a historian. His book simply aims, as he 
says, "to be a series of pictures of America 
in a big job." He believes that the many 
millions who contributed their mite to the 
Red Cross "will be proud to read of the 
noble achievements which they helped to 
make possible. 

This narrative of an American effort will 
prove to be all that its modest author hopes 
and a good deal more. Its vivid chapters 
will be an inspiration to future historians. 
Published by the Macmillan Company, New 
York. 



THE HAPPY HIGHWAYS 

The claim is made for Margaret Storm 
Jameson's "Happy Highways", that it is a 
book which expresses the spirit of young 
England. That is another way of saying 
that it speaks for all humanity, as the world 
is ever young. The old play a small part in 
it, and youth is impatient even of that 
moiery. "You have lived your alloted years, 
so begone, old boy. We need no veterans 
lagging superfluous on the stage!" That is 
the pose of youth — not now but always. 
Needless to say that books vivid with the joy 
of life can only be written by those who 
have had no time to lose their illusions. The 
principal trouble with such works is that the 
child yielding the pen is unconscious that 
"there is nothing new under the sun." 

Miss Jameson's book is not new in the 
sense of originality, but it is bright, and 
reflects phases of British life in anything but 
dull fashion. Published by The Century 
Company, New York. 



"KALEEMA" 

This realistic novel by Marion McClelland 
is a departure from the ordinary stage story. 
Kaleema was part of the life of one of those 
little theatrical companies which play in 
small towns and usually only one night. The 
actore play "Camille," "East Lynn,"°"OIiver 
Twist" and more like them ; and sometimes 
in the summer they get to New York and 
sun themselves on the sidewalks just above 
and below Times Square. Often when they 
have had a lean winter they play all through 
the hot months in traction parks and other 
summer resorts. Many people live this hard 
and obscure life. Kaleema wanted to forget 
it, but she couldn't. That makes the story. 
The author knows the life of the road show 
intimately. Published by The Century Com- 
pany, New York. 



can Red Cross work for our boys, when pass- 
ing through Great Britain to enter the gate- 
way to invaded France. 

The exhilaration and incentive which 
came of service at the front, in contact with 
actual warfare were denied to the American 
Red Cross staff in Great Britain. But for 
all that its work never lacked a superb in- 
spiration, nor was it devoid of moments of 
sheer drama. 

"The Passing Legions," splendidly written 
by George Buchanan Fife, and well illus- 
trated is a book of 369 pages. It will be a 
valuable addition to all libraries. Published 
by the Macmillan Company, New York. 



WITH THE DOUGHBOY IN FRANCE 

Edward Hungerford, the author of this ex- 
tremely interesting work, makes no pose 



THE PASSING LEGIONS 

This is a fascinating 



ig narrative of Ameri- 



ORIENTALIZED ENGLISH 

The Jap is a very clever fellow in many 
ways but writing the English language is not 
one of them. A San Francisco citizen who 
recently returned from the Orient brought 
back an official Japanese document, relative 
to restriction in cholera-infected ports. The 
document was printed in English for the 
benefit of foreign mariners and travelers, 
and included the instructions that follow, as 
well as a few which we omit for reasons not 
necessary to elaborate: 

1. At the Cholera infected district, the 
Imperial Port Department will give disinfec- 
tion to water, vegetable, fruits, fishes, meat, 
etc., but they are dangerous so be careful 
not to load such things as possible as you 
can. 

2. All crews are prohibited to land to 
those infected ports unless there occurs an 
unavoidable case. If you had to land don't 
eat and drink, also don't buy the above 
things. 

3. Passengers are too prohibited to land, 
but in case landed don't eat and drink, also 
don't buy the things which are written 
above. 

4. Passengers who will embark from the 
district must have medical examination, and 
even those who look like patient are pro- 
hibited to do so. 

5. Ships which are to anchor at that 
district be careful about flies and keep them 
driven away. Moreover, don't allow people 
come into the ships who live in the district. 

6. When the ships sail from that port 
or call at that port, surgeon give attention 
always to the passengers and crews health 
and if there is any diarrhoea patient must 
be isolated immediately and inspect bowels. 

7. Water closet and its purging pipe 
must wash in the broad ocean before arrival 
to the district. After arrival diarrhoea 
patient and all passengers, except 1st, 2nd 
class passengers and superior crews must 
have bowels inspected and those who don't 
have it must not throw their bowels inside 
the harbour unless given them disinfection. 

Etc., etc., etc. 







LJSMCO !■«• 



N. W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Lunrheon 1 1 a. m. to 2 p. m. 

548 Sacramento St.. cor. Leidesdorff 



Fourth St. Garage 

423 4th St., near Harrison St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Excellent Service 

Convenient 

Spacious 

Tires and Accessories 

PHONE GARFIELD 600 



buy and Night Service 



Tires and Accessories 



Stockton and Sutter 

- GARAGE- 

DOLSON & ANDERSON, Inc. 

410 STOCKTON STREET 

PHONE DOUGLAS 5388 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



CLUB GARAGE 

727 SOUTH OLIVE STREET 

Phone Main 2368 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



PENMAN GARAGE 
900-932 BUSH STREET 

Phone Prospect 956 

SAN FRANCISCO 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles to the Gallon" 



Associated Oil Company 



Sharon Bldg. 



San Francisco 



AUTOMOBILE STARTING AND 
LIGHTING SYSTEMS 

Give satisfactory results when given proper at- 
tention. We specialize on Electrical equipment, 
storage batteries, etc., and guarantee satisfaction. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

Brand & Cushman 
955 Post St. Phone Prospect 741 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



We Stand for the Best in Business Training 



Munson 




School 



..for.. 

Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 

Send for Catalog 



Potted Plants 
and Ferns 

OF DISTINCTION 

SUITABLE FOR ANY 

OCCASION AT NURSERY 

PRICES 

Bay Counties Seed Co. and 

Nurserie. 

404 Market Street, San Francisco 



PROMPT SERVICE 

is a feature of our daily luncheon. You can 
dine here in 30 minutes or less if you wish 

SPECIAL LUNCHEON. $1.00 

OR SHORT ORDERS A LA CARTE 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNER. $1.75 

Sunday and Week Days 

DANCING 

6 TO 9 EVERY EVENING 
BERGEZ-FRANKS 

Old P00DLE-D0G Co. 

421 BUSH STREET. ABOVE KEARNY 
Phone Douglas 241 1 



Most Pleasant Time of the Year at 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

To Enjoy Sports and Social Pleasures 
CARL S. STANLEY MANAGER 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 
Offices— S0S-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



Old Hampshire Bond f A v M . .. 



Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than seems necessary." The 
typewriter papers are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through your printer or stationer, or, if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the antire 
line. 

BLAKE. MOFFITT & T0WNE 

Established 1855 
37-45 FIRST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 









Leading Newspaper of th 


e Pacific Coast 








A 


N 


ewspaper 


ma 


de every 


day 








TO 


SPEAK 


TO 








Ever 


y 


member of 


every 


f ami 


ly 



Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for 90 cent* a 

month —including Sunday editions. 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster. 



«>»»0»»»»»»»»»»»»»»0»»Ot>»»»»»»»»»»»»»0*)»»0»)0»»»»»»»»»»»ft ^O O»»» 



£L 



SAN FRANCISCO 




Established July 20 1856 




AND 

(Ealtfnrtua AfcuertiBpr 
PRICE 10 CENTS SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 1921 $5.00 PER YEAR 



We Specialize in 

BROKEN HILLS 

and 

CON. VIRGINIA 

d otht 



ana other 



Active Nevada Mining Issues 



Listed on the 



San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Your business and inquiries solicited 



G. E. ARROWSMITH & CO. 

MEMBERS SAN FRANCISCO STOCK EXCHANGE 

117 Russ Building SAN FRANCISCO 




N. W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. 

548 Sacramento St., cor. Leidesdorff 



Fourth St. Garage 

423 4th St., near Harrison St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Excellent Service 

Convenient 

Spacious 

Tires and Accessories 

PHONE GARFIELD 600 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than seems necessary." The 
typewriter papers are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through your printer or stationer, or, if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the entire 
line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 



Liny and Night Service 



Tires and Accessories 



Stockton and Sutter 

- GARAGE- 

DOLSON & ANDERSON, Inc. 

410 STOCKTON STREET 

PHONE DOUGLAS 5388 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CLUB GARAGE 
727 ft II HI OLIVE STREET 

Phone Main 2168 
IAS ANGELES, CAL. 



DESMAN GARAGE 

900-932 Bl'.SH STREET 

Phone Prospect 956 

san FRANCISCO 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles to the Gallon" 



% 

Associated Oil Company 



Sharon Bide. 



San Francisco 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

Gus' Fashion 

The MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT 

65 Post Street. Near Market Street. 
Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners. 

FISH AND CAME A SPECIALTY 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



We Stand for the Best in Business Training 




Si School 



Munson 



Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 

Send for Catalog 



Potted Plants 
and Ferns 

OF DISTINCTION 

SUITABLE FOR ANY 

OCCASION AT NURSERY 

PRICES 

Bay Counties Seed Co. and 

Nurserie- 

404 Market Street, San Francisco 



PROMPT SERVICE 

is a feature of our daily luncheon. You can 
dine here in 30 minutes or less if you wisb 

SPECIAL LUNCHEON. $1.00 

OR SHORT ORDERS A LA CARTE 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNER, $1.75 

Sunday and Week Days 

DANCING 

6 TO 9 EVERY EVENING 
BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old P00DLE-D0G Co. 

421 BUSH STREET, ABOVE KEARNY 
Phone Douglas 2411 



Most Pleasant Time of the Year at 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

To Enjoy Sports and Social Pleasures 
CARL S. STANLEY V MANAGER 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 
Offices— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



£<M*t^x&««e»Sxe*8xS«8x8K$x»xt*sX s y s ^^ 



jj>an iriranriaro QHinrntrlg 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 



A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for 90 cent* a 

month — including Sunday editions. 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster. 



37-45 FIRST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 1921 



No. 5 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second- 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year, $5.00. Foreign: One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

Now we shall see how many of those Chicago building 

people indicted by a Federal grand jury will go to jail. 



The tariff to see Pavlowa is five dollars. Pretty high — but it 

costs so much for dancing suits these days. 



Sunday closing in San Francisco will make it as lively as 

Tangier Island, back East, where they shoot little boys who don't 
go to church. 



Lloyd George is not so preoccupied with international prob- 
lems as to forget to have his salary raised — $15,000 extra. At the 
same time some of the low officers' and the Lord Chancellor's pay 
envelopes had crimps put in them. 



What would the legislative reports from Sacramento be with- 
out the names of the Three Musketeers, Al. McCabe, Ray Benjamin 
and Martin Madsen? They seem to be the whole show. 



The Atlanta Constitution is very emphatic in its advocacy of 

severe punishment for burglars and highwaymen ; but is amazingly 
dumb on the live topic of giving long sentences to lynchers. 



More negro lynchings in the enlightened South this week, but 

the edifying ceremony of burning at the stake was overlooked. Why 
this omission, brethren ? The world must be kept safe for democracy. 



Andy Gallagher promised to wheel the Labor Council into 

line for us on the Navy Base project and P. H. McCarthy said 
'twas a cinch it would be at Hunter's Point. Was that the hoodoo? 



The author of the proposed Federal blue laws comes from 

Tennessee, and his name is Noah Copper. Evidently a direct 
descendant of the original Noah, to judge by his anxiety to get 
mankind into his own boat. 



Our sapient Board of Supervisors did not get the Navy Base 

for us, but they're not as much dead ones as people think. They 
gave John Bull a kick in the pants this week by a Sinn Fein reso- 
lution that will make the British lion growl. 



If the Governor should make the tax question the big issue 

in the next campaign maybe 'twould prove a boomerang to knock 
the State machine to pieces 
they're hatched. 



We must congratulate the Oaklanders on winning the Navy 

Base. But let them not forget that they would go along even faster 
as part of a "Greater San Francisco." 



The young bandits are going some when a nineteen-year-old 

kid is ringleader of a trio attempting to hold up a mail collector 
of the United States post office and rob the mails. Movie education 
in outlawry. 



Nauseated by sex propaganda in the movies, astonishing 

crowds are flocking to hear that magnificent actor Robert Mantell in 
Shakespeare in clean drama. 



The false and scandalous insinuations against Charles M. 

Schwab in connection with the Government shipping program have 
had the effect of making him more respected and popular than ever. 
It is not easy to vilify an innocent man. 



Forty-five indictments against building contractors and union 

business agents, for violating the truck laws, have been returned this 
week by a Federal grand jury in Chicago. There ought to be about 
145 indictments in San Francisco. 



The tilt of the corporations and Governor Stephens over the 

increased tax-rate suggests the problem of "An Irresistible Force 
Meeting an Immoval Obstacle." Only something moved just the 
least bit. 



The corporations might have stood the tax increase of 

33 I /3 per cent if they had been going on the low gear, but they 
were on the high and the last notch of that. Hence the fight they 
put up against the Governor. 



What's the use of us taxpayers setting up a roar against State 

expenses) If we want an ornamental government we must expect 
to pay for it. One can't put up at the Palace Hotel and expect to 
pay Cafeteria rates. 



Fifteen new cops added to the load on the taxpayers, and all 

the gin mills under prohibition. What about the promises that when 
cold water killed John Barleycorn all the jails would close up and 
the police join the Salvation Army? 



-One of the very costly departments of the United States 



service at Washington must be the Public Printing office, which is 
You never can count chickens before running day in and day out on beaurocratic publicity stuff, intended 

to boost a lot of official noodles in fat sinecures. 



Those Sacramento correspondents who got all their inspira- 
tion from the Go\ernor's "Three Musketeers." must have received an 
awful jolt when the corporations steam-rolled the gubernatorial 
phalanx on the tax bill. According to the correspondents, it was all 
over but the shouting, with the Governor an easy winner on the first 
round. Political prediction is a hazardous trade, boys. 



It is quite a shock to moralists of the dailies to discover that 

Armenian brides in California are sold outright for cash to their 
future lords and fruit pickers. Lots of our California beauties get 
only promises, and after the first month Romeo cannot produce 
the apartment rent and the installment jeweler seizes the engage- 
ment ring. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29, 1921 



DIToMAL 




Press dispatches this week report Lloyd George as 
Irish Question indignant with his treatment by Paris journalists. 
Not all the news that comes over the cables from 
Europe can be accepted as true. A great deal of political propa- 
ganda is now filtering through the cable messages from England. 
over which the Northcliffe press exercises influence equivalent to 
censorship. 

We can tell better what Paris has done to annoy Lloyd George 
when we receive the French newspapers. 

The Paris press has been very considerate of English statesmen 
since France and England joined hands to eliminate Germany as 
a dominating Central European power. The tone of the leading 
Paris papers has been studiously polite, except when an occasional 
French editor oversteps the bounds and gives vent to some of the 
old racial spirit. The French government has discouraged that as 
far as possible, but Paris editors are not a placid and obedient lot. 

The Irish question has been treated by Paris editors with much 
caution though the tone of the leading newspapers has been sympa- 
thetic to the Sinn-Feiners. When McSwinney starved himself to 
death, the important Paris newspapers condoled with the widow 
and lauded the spirit of self-abnegation, which made martyrs of Irish 
nationalists. The condolence was profuse. France professes to 
adore nationalism, except the martyrs happen to be Algerians or 
Teutons unfriendly to la patrie. It makes all the difference in the 
world whose ox is gored, in European politics. 

While the hrench editors have not given the Sinn-Feiners much 
solid comfort even in soft words, they have not pleased English 
tory journals by printing any sympathetic utterances at all. The 
undercurrent of race antagonism found expression, recently, when 
Paris had some trivial trouble in the commune of Montmartre, and 
the London press made great sport of it. It was so very amusing 
to the Londoners. Paris became very angry. Some Paris writers 
retorted, hotly, that if French editors took up the Irish problem they 
might make the subject anything but facetious for England, and 
it was very bad taste to pour oil on the political flames in an ally's 
country. The outburst of Gallic spleen was not warranted by the 
harmless jocosity of the London newspapers. It showed that under- 
neath the superficial friendliness, France and England are much 
the same old rivals. 

That national antagonism has been increased by the English desire 
to renew business relations with Germany and Bolshevik Russia. 
The display of unfriendliness complained of by Lloyd George may be 
the overture to open expressions of displeasure with Albion's 
European policy. 



Because many San Francisco women attend 
Like Carrion Birds the trial of the Howard street gangsters in the 

Superior Court, uncomplimentary remarks on 
the fair sex are heard. It must be peculiar to California, say 
critics. Not at all. A horrible French case, beside which the 
gangster obsenity has social refinement, was tried within a month at 
Paris. The judge declined to close the doors against the morbidly 
curious, but warned the large audience that the testimony would be 
one of appalling atrocities. Persons afraid of being shocked had 
better leave the court room, he warned. Only one woman took the 
judge's advice, states Le Journal, in its report of the horrible case. 



The dramatist or novelist of today has to 
Fiction Needs Change work on new lines, should he wish to hold 
the mirror up to Nature. Fiction writers 
scan the newspaper for fresh ideas, it is said. 

One can imagine how a Dickens or Thackeray or Balzac or 
Hawthorne, would have rubbed his eyes had he run across such a 
news item as follows. It has been copied from the Oakland news 
of a San Francisco evening newspaper of Wednesday last: 

Wearing a new hat jauntily trimmed in gay colors. Mrs. 
Virginia Clark, convicted of the murder of her matrimonial 
bureau husband, Chester Clark, whom she shot one Sunday 
morning as he lay in bed beside her, was removed today from 
the Alameda county jail to San Quentin prison, where she 
began serving an indeterminate sentence of from ten years to 
life imprisonment. The trip was made by automobile and 
Mrs. Clark, smiling serenely, remarked to a reporter: "I will 
not be there long in any event." 

A large engraving of the interesting murderess accompanied the 
account of her journey and details of her millinery decorations and 
corroborated the statement about her smiling serenity. The proverbial 
"basket of chips" could not have displayed more complacency. 
Merriment sparkles in her eyes, and her exhibit of dental perfection 
almost borders on what is colloquially referred to as "a broad grin." 

What a lot the old masters of fiction, Dickens, Thackeray, Balzac. 
Hawthorne — even Dumas, king of romance, had to learn! Well 
they are dead. 

Murder to those by-gone word painters suggested the horrible, the 
repulsive, the reprehensible. There was nothing in their chromatic 
scale of words sombre enough to describe a gentle murderess being 
packed off to jail for life perhaps. How those ancient word-twiners 
would pile on the agony, the tears of remorse, the clenched hands 
indicative of the awful inward struggle, the blanched cheeks, the 
suppressed moans and the inevitable dead faint on the threshold of 
the prison. 

They reveled in their skill to rasp the reader's emotions and paint 
the devil and all his words in lamp black — those great fictionists of 
the days agone. Read Dickens' description of burglar Bill Sykes 
and his bulldog slinking through a marsh after the murder of the 
faithful Nancy. Scan Shakespeare's picture of Macbeth after the 
killing of the royal Duncan. How the lusty Scotch villain's con- 
science tears his heart, as ceaselessly as Jove's vulture tore the 
liver of Prometheus. 

In far different colors should such scenes be depicted nowadays 
by up-to-date fiction writers. No word picture of the lonely marsh 
with the slinking murderer of poor Nancy, afraid to look up to 
heaven, for God was there, or look down at his cowering bulldog 
for shame of the brute's moral superiority. Nothing of that sort of 
mush in novels henceforth can be tolerated. Bill, the burglar, 
types will be described smoking fat five-cent cigars at the street 
corner while the Dago bootblack shines their shoes and take the 
blood-stains out of their clothes. The watching cop across the 
street will be speculating whether Bill robbed a home, or stole an 
automobile, and what would be the best plan to shake him down on 
a 50-50 basis. 

Similarly with Shakespeare's Thane of Cawdor, after making an 
autopsy case of King Duncan. No realistic dramatists of the new 
school would have Lady Macbeth waste her nights in somnambu- 
listic wringings of her hands and futile efforts to wash out "the 
accursed stain." She would trip down to the manicure parlors and 
lunch at a cafe dansant and spend a delightful afternoon at bridge- 
whist or the movies. Her lord and spouse, instead of conjuring up 
spirits, would be chasing some "moonshine" or off doing politics 
with the League of Nations. 

Oh. believe me. Messieurs, the times have changed since Shakes- 
peare and Dickens. 



January 29. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



The Murder Record Explained 



IN THE COLUMNS of the News Letter at- 
tention has many times been directed to 
the appalling murder record of the United 
States every year. It has at last become a 
topic of interest in the great newspapers and 
magazines of the Atlantic States. 

In the New York World of January 16, 
Professor Charles W. Beard is quoted as 
saying to a World reporter: 

"There are more murders in one second 
rate American city, like Chicago, than there 
are in all England and Wales; and as for 
burglary — well, burglary insurance costs ap- 
proximately fifteen times as much in Ameri- 
can cities as it does in European cities of 
the same class." 

Professor Beard was formerly of Columbia 
University, and is now with the New School 
for Social Research. 

The News Letter has maintained that the 
cause of so many crimes of violence in 
America is not because of any natural dis- 
position to commit murder but on account of 
the popular lack of confidence in the courts. 
Arrest and imprisonment do not mean swift 
and heavy punishment as in Europe. Poli- 
tics has made the courts feeble. State 
judges who are compelled to seek re-election 
every few years have too much timidity in 
the enforcement of the laws. Federal judges 
are more feared than those of the States, 
that elect judicial officers. 

President Beard is of the same opinion as 
the News Letter, that Americans "are not 
an unruly lot" in the sense of natural 
tendency to crime. "Historically, Americans 
have been unruly," admits the professor. 
Quoting his words : 

"We began our independence with revo- 
lution, and incorrigible individualism is the 
very warp and woof of American tradition. 
The country was settled in the first place by 
courageous people who simply could not be 
held by the apron-strings of European cus- 
tom. 

"These settlers were not philosophical 
revolutionists. They didn't come here to 
establish a new order; they came here to 
establish themselves. They had never ques- 
tioned the institution of private property; in 
fact, they did not know that private prop- 
erty was an institution. And they clashed 
from the start with native tribes who didn't 
understand this alien institution in the least. 
Their dealings with the Indians, then, were 
almost necessarily violent. Especially as 
they took up new territory did the settlers be- 
come a law unto themselves. They had to. 
There was no other court to which they 
could appeal; and they appealed to theit 



own individual consciences very largely, not 
only in dealing with the Indians but in deal- 
ing with each other. 

"After the revolution, American history 
was very largely the story of the extension 
of the western frontier. This was a continu- 
ous tale of Indian wars, of gun-play, of 
settling all scores between man and man. 
'May the best man win' is a cardinal point 
in our national faith; and right up to the 
present time Americans have never been 
known as over-fastidious in their recognitiot. 
of success. 

"This seems almost inevitable. You 
can't build a new world out of old traditions. 
The law that eventually sticks is the law 
that works, and this dominant individualism, 
which sometimes takes the form of crime, 
succeeds." 

"Tell me," Professor Beard asked, "what 
would you expect to be the percentage ol 
crime in such a country > Don't you think it 
would be about all that the traffic would 
bear? Well, it is, and it always has been. 
And any attempt to fix the entire blame upon 
the laxity of some particular police depart- 
ment in some particular city will not get us 
very far toward correcting the situation." 

The remedy is in the improvement of our 
courts. We should try to surround them 
with respect but that cannot be while judges 
are forced to practice the wiles of politics 
to insure their retention in office. 

All judges should be appointed and re- 
tained in office while able to perform their 
duties. When superannuated they should 
receive pensions. 

Crooked judges should be driven from the 
bench without compromise or delay. 



LEADS THE WORLD 

California's .position in the educational 
world is shown by the appended list: 

Registered 

Publicly Supported tQIO-igiO 

University of California 11,893 

College of the City of New York 9,071 

University of Michigan 8,560 

University of Illinois 8,549 

University of Minnesota 8,275 

University of Wisconsin 7,294 

Ohio State University 7,023 

University of Washington 5,958 

University of Nebraska 5,286 

University of Louisiana 4,933 

University of Texas 4,418 

University of Missouri 4,222 

Pennsylvania State College 4,194 

Iowa State College 4,034 

University of Kansas 5,589 

University of Cincinnati 3,513 

Oregon State College of Agriculture 3,442 

Kansas State College of Agriculture 2,961 

University of Oklahoma 2,608 

University of Colorado 2,096 

State Colloge of Washington 2,037 

Privately Supported 

Columbia 9,144 

Temple 6,490 

Northwestern University 6,585 

Pennsylvania 6,449 

Boston 6,082 

Cornell 5,765 

Harvard 5.373 

George Washington 3,798 

University of Southern California ... 3,012 

Georgetown 2,139 

Tulane 2,602 

Johns Hopkins 2,014 

Smith 2,011 

Yale 3,157 



"Pa put in six cases of whiskey before the 
country went dry so as to have a supply in 
the event of sickness." 

"Well?" 

"I don't believe he's had a well day 
since." 




Chiropractic 
Oxygen Vapor 
UltraViolet Rays 

LADIES -I dc*irr to announce that I have secured ihe 
services of DR. MAID rETERSOX, licensed by the Slate 
Board of Medical Examiners (February 16. 1907), to practice 
in the Sate of California. 

OSTEOPATHY 

Specialist in Women's and Children's Diseases. 



DR. GEO. D. GILLESPIE 



REGULARLY LICENSED DRUGLESS PHYSICIAN 

Tubercular. Organic. Nervous, Rectal, Colon, Prostatic. Chronic. Skin and Scalp Diseases. My 

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SESD FOR IT. MAILED FREE 

LADY ATTENDANTS CONSULTATION FREE 

335 Stockton Street ^VlTJLT^oor San Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29, 1921 



Immigration Suspension Unnecessary 



IMMIGRATION is the burden of pessimistic 
talk now. How can we stop the European 
deluge? demand the pessimists. How can 
we prevent Japan from eating us up? query 
the politicians. Nobody stops to think that 
America has been absorbing millions of im- 
migrants for these long years and getting 
rich at it, and yet with all that accumulation 
of human energy the United States is hardly 
scratched over. Observant foreigners come 
here and express surprise at how much 
opportunity is still left for expansion. 

Many San Franciscans remember the anti- 
Chinese agitation and its "sandlot orators" 
headed by Denis Kearny. To prevent white 
people from patronizing Chinese laundries, 
it was deemed a patriotic mob movement to 
burn down wash-houses. If the wretched 
coolie owners perished in the conflagration 
so much the merrier. 

In some provincial towns of the Pacific 
Coast, there were atrocious butcheries of the 
unresisting Chinese worthy of wild Apaches. 
Now the Chinaman has vanished as a factor 
in the labor market of America, and all the 
racial hatred concentrated on him, has been 
shifted to the Japanese. A few years ago 
we were worshipping the Japanese as super- 
men. The newspapers were crammed with 
praise of Nipponese courtesy, the sagacity, 
the industry, and the progressiveness of the 
Mikado's subjects. The reverse is now the 
case. The Jap has suddenly been invested 
with malignant characteristics, and if we 
can believe our politicians and the yellow 
press that supports them, California, if not 
the whole Pacific Coast, may soon be an 
annex to Nippon. 

All this kind of propaganda it flat, stale 
and unprofitable pabulum to any one who 
remembers the sandlot agitation and the hys- 
terical demand for the expulsion of the 
Chinese. The chief difference between the 
attacks on the Chinese and the Japanese, 
is that the mob has not resorted to physical 
violence. The Jap will fight. So will the 
nation behind him. The Chinese vegetable 
peddler bore his martyrdom stoically, when 
the white hoodlums stoned him and robbed 
his vegetable and fruit baskets. 

In this way the Chinese was a benefactor. 
He did a great deal of rough labor which the 
white man would not have attempted. He 
was a useful pioneer. He helped to connect 
the Atlantic Coast and the Pacific Coast with 
a band of steel. In a local way he showed 
the possibilities of truck gardens in the 
suburbs of San Francisco. How many of 
the blatant sandlot politicians denouncing 
the laborious and peaceful coolie gardeners 
would have soiled their hands in the Chinese 
truck gardens of the suburbs? Bawling their 
raucous appeals to racial prejudices was 



Naturalization Laws Are 
What Need Amendment 

By Harvey Brougham 

more to the liking of those white job- 
chasers, who eventually obtained control of 
the municipal government of San Francisco 
and have never since been completely elim- 
inated. 

It is a mistaken idea that the Asiatic coolie 
living on a much lower plane than most 
Europeans would inevitably bring the su- 
perior people to his level. The contrary has 
been clearly demonstrated in California, 
where the Chinese were unable to withstand 
the industrialism of white America. The 
shoe industry in California, conducted with 
Chinese cheap labor, succumbed to the com- 
petition of white shoemakers in Massachu- 
setts. That, too, with the advantage of sev- 
eral thousand miles of transportation in 
favor of the Chinese shoe factories in San 
Francisco. The white shoemakers of Massa- 
chusetts, three thousand miles away, could 
undersell, here on the Pacific Coast, the 
home-made Chinese products — not only in 
fine shoes but in the very lowest grade of 
rough and cheap shoes. 

That seems incredible, but the facts have 
been well established. Skilled American 
labor has triumphed over Chinese cheap 
labor in the making of shoes and cigars. 

On the Pacific Coast now there is no sign 
that the immigration of Asiatic labor has had 
the effect of displacing white hands or 
"dragging them down to the Oriental level." 
Asiatics become rapidly Americanized, but 
Americans suffer no deterioration. At present 
that would, of course, be impossible at the 
present rate of Asiatic immigration, as the 
number of Japanese in California is less than 
3 per cent of the total population of the 
State. Such is the figure set by Dr. Sidney 
L. Gulick, secretary of the National Com- 
mittee for Constructive Immigration Legis- 
lation. Dr. Gulick made that statement the 
other day at a meeting in the New York Re- 
publican Club, at which was .present the 
chief naturalization examiner of the United 
States Department of Labor, and prominent 
congressmen. 

Dr. Gulick favors what he calls an "elastic 
plan of immigration," as opposed to the law 
for suspension of all immigration to the 
United States. 

The House of Representatives recently 
voted for suspension, and the measure is 
pending in the United States Senate. It is 
not a wise measure and is regarded as a 
straddle on the Japanese immigration prob- 
lem. If all nationalities be barred tempor- 
arily from immigration, the Japanese, it is 



thought, cannot complain of offensive dis- 
crimination. But that theory is rather 
weakened by the announcement from Tokio, 
that Japan will not be satisfied with the 
plan. Undoubtedly the Japanese will insist 
that whenever immigration will be renewed 
the Mikado's subjects shall be classified as 
eligible to entry. 

It would be much better if the United 
States could remove this immigration ques- 
tion from small politics where it figures at 
present. It should be an economic question, 
not one to enable politicians to make votes 
by arousing or placating racial prejudices. 
It has been invested with its most objection- 
able features by the anti-Japanese propa- 
ganda in California. "Exclusion of the Jap" 
was the slogan of the recent election for 
United States Senator in our State. 

One of the erroneous ideas about foreign 
immigration is that all the nations of the 
earth are eager to pack their small belong- 
ings and head for the United States. The 
truth is that in Western Europe emigration 
appeals only to those forced by their poverty 
or to the young and adventurous who prefer 
to try their luck in foreign lands. Emigra- 
tion amongst the educated and more pros- 
perous classes in Europe is considered to be 
a social misfortune. America therefore re- 
ceives from Europe the classes that are easily 
assimilated in its industrial and commercial 
life. A large proportion are the hewers of 
wood and the drawers of water who in their 
days of strength are usually in demand in 
the United States. In a comparatively short 
time the energy of these immigrants is con- 
sumed in the intense struggle for life and 
they pass away. Their children become, 
through the public schools, Americans in all 
the outward and visible signs of Ameri- 
canism, whatever they may be sentimentally; 
but it is safe to say that 90 per cent of them 
are loyal citizens. 

In a lesser degree than formerly the 
United States is made the asylum for foreign 
criminals. The laws against their admission 
are more drastic, but clever criminals man- 
age to evade most prosecutive laws. 

The United States is more in need of laws 
to modify citizenship than suspend immi- 
gration. Not half the qualified voters now 
have an intelligent conception of their gov- 
ernment and the voting of irresponsible 
thousands on bond elections and serious pub- 
lic policies makes popular government a 
farce. 

No alien should acquire the right to vote 
before ten years at least and nobody but tax- 
payers should have any say in municipal 
elections. If they paid even $10 in taxes 
they would be eligible, but the permitting of 
every hobo to cast his ballot on public in- 
debtedness is a public crime. 



January 29, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Corporations and Governors 



THE CORPORATIONS have been com- 
pelled, in self defense, to do some 
legislative politics on their own ac- 
count and defeat Governor Stephens' plan 
to increase corporation taxes. 

For years the California corporations have 
preferred peace to political war. That has 
been the political tendency in most States. 

Formerly in California it was different. 
The Southern Pacific Company was typical 
of corporation influence in politics. Gov- 
ernor Stanford, as its head, believed in main- 
taining a strong political machine to safe- 
guard his corporation. He liked politics. 
He fought many political battles with am- 
bitious tribunes of the people, and met few 
defeats. The system of politics in vogue in 
his day favored him. 

Party conventions then nominated govern- 
ors and lawmakers in accordance with party 
lines closely drawn. Party bosses attended 
to the details of selecting a ticket, with care- 
ful regard for the harmony of their party. 
Influential party men were consulted, and 
when the ticket was placed before the people 
it expressed, usually, the party choice of 
candidates. If successful those candidates 
regarded themselves as responsible to their 
party, and the professional bosses got a large 
share of the political patronage. Even gov- 
ernors did not dare to ignore the party 
bosses. 

A great railroad magnate like Stanford 
with a talent for politics could sway legisla- 
tures and exercise dictatorial power. Gov- 
ernors were only cogs in the party machine. 

When Stanford died and Collis P. Hunt- 
ington assumed full authority over the 
Southern Pacific company his first act was 
to scrap its political machine. Politics he 
despised. Essentially a business man, he 
regarded politics as a waste of energy in the 
conduct of a great corporation. Far better 
devote to betterment of transportation 
service the money spent on politics. 
* * * 

That, he announced as his policy, and ex- 
pressed the belief that the public would ap- 
preciate the change. If the public has felt 
so, there is no record of it. Political attacks 
on railroads and large corporations gener- 
ally have been as persistent as ever. It has 
been demonstrated to practical politicians 
and political students that in a government 
af universal suffrage, large incorporations of 
capital must fight continually for life o: 
perish. 

Since Huntington's day the political 
pendulum has swung towards non-partisan- 
ship. Party lines have been broken down 



and the officeholders have become the politi- 
cal bosses. This is the condition in most of 
the States. Instead of relying on party 
strength for success the officeholders rely on 
personal popularity and that means liberal 
distribution of patronage. The costs of gov- 
ernment have increased by leaps and bounds 
in States and municipalities. The tax ques- 
tion has become a burning one and is about 
to bring matters to a climax. The crushing 
weight of the taxes has, in a large measure, 
been shifted to the corporations, as that 
expedient has helped to popularize the office- 
holding bosses. As long as the corporations 
were cinched the public applauded. 

Now, the tax load has become intolerable 
to the corporations. Gradually their limit 
has been reached. The last straw threatens 
the patient camel's backbone. The corpora- 
tions are in revolt, and in California we have 
the spectacle of a political tug-of-war be- 
tween the governor and the legislature. For 
years the legislative body has been a political 
legacy to governors. It seemed the next 
thing to treason to question the guberna- 
torial right to dictate legislation. 



SYMPHONY PLANS 

The music lovers of San Francisco are dis- 
cussing, earnestly, the financial prospects of 
the splendid Symphony Orchestra, which has 
given our city such art celebrity. There are 
but ten symphony orchestras in the United 
States, and ours is one of acknowledged ex- 
cellence. 

It costs $175,000 a year to maintain our 
Symphony Orchestra, and only $75,000 is 
realized from box-office receipts. The 
weight of the enterprise therefore falls on 
the generosity of public-spirited citizens, who 
believe that the money devoted to the exist- 
ence of a splendid musical organization is 
well spent. It raises the standard of public 
taste in music, and its social benefits are in- 
calculable in creating a taste for art and re- 
finement. 

Our Symphony Orchestra has been in ex- 
istence ten years, and is composed of eighty- 
five grand artists, many of whom have been 
members since the organization was formed 
Others have been five years with the Orches- 
tra, which at the present moment is at the 
height of its artistic efficiency. 

To permit an organization of such merit 
to be broken up would be unthinkable. That 
contingency does not impend, but it is de- 
sirable that the public should understand the 
condition of affairs and realize the import- 
ance of maintaining the Orchestra intact. 

The financial problem is to carry on the 
Symphony Orchestra, for the three years be- 
fore completion of the splendid War Mem- 



orial in the Civic Center on Van Ness ave- 
nue, near the city hall. That building will 
contain a great assembly hall, acoustically 
arranged and possessing a capacity of 3000 
seats for concert purposes. That would 
afford the required space for Symphony pur- 
poses, and do much to place the project on 
a substantial basis. 

Meantime it is suggested that 1500 annual 
memberships be sold at $100 each. There 
should be no difficulty in disposing of them 
in such a prosperous community, notably 
appreciative of good music. The plan 
would broaden the field of popular interest. 

With our Symphony Orchestra in vigorous 
existence and the War Memorial erected, 
San Francisco would hold an incomparable 
position in the world of music. It is worth 
serious thought, for San Francisco will con- 
tinue to attract more and more people of 
money and leisure, to enjoy her unexampled 
climate, her glorious park, her wonderful 
ocean views and her incomparable suburban 
drives. We have all the essentials for becom- 
ing a Paris of the Pacific, and should pro- 
ceed with the art development as of first 
importance. America has plenty of cities 
that suggest wealth, but few that exhibit 
the appealing combination which gives San 
Francisco such world-wide distinction. 



NO PLACE LIKE CALIFORNIA 

Under California skies in mid-winter, 
Olympic Club athletes take a New Year's 
dip in the Pacific Ocean, and outdoor sports 
are all in full swing, it is interesting to read 
the following song of praise from a London 
newspaper: 

What was more astonishing was that 
on Christmas Day and Sunday we had 
clear skies and sunshine. In winter mild 
weather usually means rain or the 
threat of rain, and sunshine means 
frost. In the parks people sat about 
sunning themselves as in summer, and 
the benches were crowded, so far from 
"parky" was the weather (if I have got 
the slang right). At Hamstead people 
played tennis (on the hard courts), and 
everywhere the tops of the 'buses were 
crowded and there was more room in- 
side. 



Cause of Hard Steering 
Many complaints are made about hard 
steering. Lack of lubrication is the principal 
cause. Don't forget that the steering knuckle 
pivot pins must be greased at all times. 
These have large bearing surfaces which 
cause a heavy drag if dry and rusty. 



"What is this?" asked the guest. 

"It's beer." replied his host. "I made it 
myself." 

"Beer?" 

"Yes: what did you think it was?" 

"I don't know. It looks like something 
that ought to be used in a fountain pen." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29. 1921 



Domestic Servants No More 

By Gertrude Martin. 



WE ARE ACCUSTOMED in San Fran- 
cisco to think of our city as being 
unusual in the difficulty of finding 
domestic servants. The English newspapers 
constantly complain of the sorrows of British 
housewives unable to find cooks and house- 
maids. 

It is estimated by the Ministry of Labor 
that 150,000 women in England are unem- 
ployed. In December 460,148 of the women 
out of places, registered at the free employ- 
ment exchanges, and it was announced that 
28,344 were "desirous of domestic work," 
only 16,648 places were filled, though 27,666 
vacant situations awaited applicants. No 
doubt many expectant employers were un- 
willing to hire the servants who offered them- 
selves, as only 2000 "could be regarded as 
trained domestics." 

The world war caused a great disarrange- 
ment of the respective fields of employment 
for women and men in Great Britain. Girls 
undertook men's work in factories and stores 
and are now reluctant to return from that 
unusual and profitable employment to do- 
mestic service. There are a great many 
middle-aged, untrained women in England 
who would accept domestic work, and it is 
suggested as an experiment, that the govern- 
ment shall furnish them training. That does 
not appear an encouraging prospect for the 
average housewife who wishes to employ a 
young smart girl, able to cook and clean 
house. 

In San Francisco many housewives have 
lost hope of ever again finding satisfactory 
help. Many such housewives crowding into 
apartments and hotels. The domestic help 
problem being too much for those women, 
unable or unwilling to perform the drudgery 
of domesticity they pass the trouble on to 
the hotel keepers, or apartment house man- 
ager. The hotels and apartment houses are 
compelled to charge higher prices than for- 
merly, and the general result is far different 
from the conditions familiar to the former 
generation of Americans. 

San Francisco housewives did not realize 
how fortunate they were in the old days 
when a good Japanese cook could be hired 
for $25 a month, or a Chinese boy for $35. 
Now the Japanese have vanished from the 
kitchen to engage in trade or become brokers 
in Asiatic labor. A good Chinese cook of 
the old type is found but in the homes of 
millionaires and receives almost as high a 
salary as a French chef in a fashionable 
hotel. 

Young women in San Francisco detest the 



position of house servant. They consider it 
socially degrading. They know that a com- 
fortable home with a kind family is prefer- 
able in physical comfort to the lodgings of 
poorly-paid stenographers or shop girls. But 
all homes are not pleasant for the domestic 
servant, and too many mistresses lack the 
ability to conduct a home. They are incon- 
siderate of their servants and inclined to 
treat them as inferiors. In Europe the work- 
ing girl expects social snobbishness amongst 
the bourgeois class, but native Americans 
resent assumption of social inferiority. They 
have imbibed the principle of all men being 
born free and equal, and however hollow 
that philosophy they act according to it 
when forced to accept a menial place. Un- 
fortunately the "lady of the house" who may 
have herself begun life in lowly station is 
not impressed by the national declaration of 
social equality, and the relations of Ameri- 
can mistress and domestic servant are too 
often the reverse of ideal. Not infrequently 
the servant may possess better manners and 
education than the nouvean riche mistress 
and believes in her heart that she could run 
a far superior establishment. All this makes 
for complication of the domestic servant 
problem in the Far West. 

Even were all our housewives well-bred 
and most considerate of their servants — as 
many are — the female domestic servant is 
averse to the restrictions of a private home. 
Every young woman's ideal is a home of her 
own and most girls in domestic service be- 
lieve that the chances of a desirable mar- 
riage are greater in some other employment 
than cook or parlor maid. It will require 
some radical changes in the popular notions 
of domestic service to make girls seek it ex- 
cept as a dernier resort, to work discontent- 
edly and quit at the first favorable oppor- 
tunity. 

ROOT OF THE PROBLEM 

The present great depression, however, is 
not normal, declares London Public Opinion 
in an editorial article on the "Breakdown of 
Credit." It is due in the main to the break- 
down of credit and the demoralization of the 
"exchanges" throughout Europe. 

"France cannot buy locomotives in Eng 
land if she has to pay 60 francs to the pound 
sterling. Germany, with an exchange of 260 
(instead of the pre-war 20) marks to the 
pound, can buy scarcely anything. Russia, 
for other reasons, cannot buy at all. And 
even neutral countries like Sweden and Den- 
mark, which made much money out of the 
war and whose 'exchanges' are fairly normal, 
are financially almost hors de combat, owing 



presumably to the ruin of Germany. There 
appears to be no remedy for this position 
save the economic rehabilitation of Central 
Europe. 

"As long as German workmen are unable 
to exercise their full productive capacity 
English workmen will be unemployed. That, 
at present, is the root of the problem. For 
the last two years we, as an industrial nation, 
have been cutting off our nose to spite our 
face. In so far as we ruin Germany we are 
ruining ourselves; and in so far as we refuse 
to trade with revolutionary Russia we are 
increasing the likelihood of violent upheavals 
in Great Britain. Sooner or later we shall 
have to scrap every treaty that has been 
signed and begin again the creation of the 
New Europe on the basis of universal co- 
operation and mutual aid. Where we have 
demanded indemnities, we must offer loans." 



ENGLAND'S DEBT TO AMERICA 

England's debt to the United States of 
nearly $5,000,000,000 will not be paid with- 
in twenty years. The United States Govern- 
ment will defer both the principal and the 
interest, and allow England to exchange long 
time notes with maturities ranging from 
twenty years up, in return for the "demand 
notes" now held by the treasury. The long 
term obligations will be so drawn as to in- 
clude accrued interest from year to year. 

How much greater the debt problem may 
become is dependent upon England's recu- 
perative power in industry and finance, and 
her willingness to meet promptly the new 
obligations entered into. England's $5,000,- 
000,000, extended over twenty years and ac- 
cumulating interest at the rate of $250,000,- 
000, will rise to a debt of more than $10,- 
C00.000.000 in twenty years. 



Ella — I'm mad at Jack. 
Bella — So soon? What's wrong? 
Ella — He knows so many naughty songs. 
Bella — Does he sing them to you? 
Ella — No, the mean thing, he just whistles 
the tunes. 



Mr. & Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove 

SPECIALIZE IN 

Hair 

Face .Treatments 

Scalp 

You have scientific care at 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

Kearny 2842 San Francisco. 

Berkeley Store 2331 Telegraph 



January 29. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Paris On Irish Reprisals 



On account of the somewhat strained rela- 
tions of the English and French Newspapers, 
at present on account of the British opposi- 
tion to the European policies of France, the 
Paris press is very conservative in its com- 
ments on the reprisals in Ireland. Word has 
been passed to the Paris editors that modera- 
tion of comment on all subjects calculated 
to arouse international feeling had better be 
observed. 

In the Paris Le Journal of January 3, we 
find the following report of its London cor- 
respondent on the Irish news of the day: 
The proclamation of the law martial, 
in the South of Ireland has been fol- 
lowed by reprisals officially avowed, but 
of which the rigor, will astonish without 
doubt the civilized world. 

Here is the text of a document pub- 
lished today by the military authorities 
at Cork: 

Following an ambuscade, organized against 
the police at Midleton, County Cork, at a place 
called Glebe House, the military governor de- 
cided that certain neighboring houses should be 
destroyed, their occupants not being able to 
have remained ignorant of the ambuscade and 
attack against the soldiers, and having neg- 
lected to apprise the military authorities or the 
police. 

The following houses have been destroyed 
between 3 and 6 a. m., January 1 (here fol- 
lowed seven names of proprietors of the 
houses.) 

A note had been sent to each of the 



persons, indicating why their house 
came to be destroyed. Then, a delay of 
an hour was given for the inhabitants 
to carry away their objects of value, 
but not their furniture. The buildings 
were then destroyed with the furniture 
which they contained. 

I send you this note without comment 
on the treatment inflicted on Ireland, 
which has given to England many of 
her very great soldiers, and of her 
artists, not to speak of the number of 
her pioneers audacious, without whom 
the empire britannique would not exist. 
The correspondent of Le Journal added 
that the night when the seven houses were 
burned at Midleton many other buildings 
were set on fire at a neighboring village. 
General Strickland who commanded the dis- 
trict, had it placarded with warnings to 
civilians: 

Severe penalties were pronounced 
not only against those found in posses- 
sion of arms, but also against those 
who knowing of a neighbor or friend 
having arms, did not immediately de- 
nounce him to the police. Such de- 
linquents were liable to imprisonment, 
and to the confiscation or the destruc- 
tion of their property. 



MOTOR CAR EXHIBIT READY 

Next Monday evening the portals of Oak- 
land's big Civic Auditorium will be thrown 
open on what promises to be one of the most 
successful motor car expositions ever staged 
in that city. 

After weeks of constant preparation for 
the annual event the Oakland motor car 
dealers are now marking time until the cur- 
tain is lifted on the big show. With the 
exception of rolling a few late arrivals into 
the arena of the auditorium today and to- 
morrow, nothing remains to be done. The 
decorators have completed their gigantic 
task of converting the interior of the stately 
structure into a veritable Fairyland where 
the Brewster green. Burgundy red and celes- 
tial blue of the latest motor car creations will 
sparkle like so many jewels against a back- 
ground of exotic splendor. 

As has been said the show will open at 7 
o'clock Monday night and continue until the 
following Sunday evening. The show is 
being ably managed by Robert W. Martland. 
secretary of the California Auto Trades 
Association. 



magazine. Especially is this the case with 
the more educated sections of the populace. 
The nominal membership of churches and of 
other religious bodies may rise and fall, and 
their active membership may vary also. But 
I do not think we can dispute that the in- 
fluence of the churches is perceptibly wan- 
ing. Their own agitations on the subject 
bear sufficiently cogent testimony. But the 
distress of the spokesmen of religious organi- 
zations is largely due to the belief that the 
decline and fall of organized religion must 
also be the decline and fall of religion itself. 
Were that necessarily so. then indeed they 
would have cause for alarm. But it is not 
necessarily so. 

We probably are less religious than we 
once were. It is not to be expected that, 
after embracing for six years the methods of 
materialism in the dealings of nation with 
nation, we should emerge with strengthened 
spiritual ardor. But in other ways our very 
indifference to organized religion may be a 
sign of a new birth of religion in forms 
which we have hardly yet learned to recog- 
nize as truly religious. 



RELIGIOUS TRANSITION 
Organized religion no longer occupies the 
place in National life "which it once held." 
asserts Wm. Barbara Wootton in an English 



FRENCH TAXES HIGH 
The French are paying higher taxes than 
any other people in the world. In France 
the national income per capita is 3200 francs 



and the national revenue per capita is 574 
francs, or 18 per cent. In Germany the 
national income is 3900 marks and the 
national revenue per capital is 474 marks, or 
12 per cent. 

A great part of France's burden is to 
repay the help given in the war. 



MAGNIFICENT HOTEL 

What a magnificent place is the Fairmont 
Hotel these wild January days, when the 
wind and rain sweep across the Bay of San 
Francisco! One can sit cosily in the great 
hotel on the hill and witness a seascape not 
excelled in the world, if indeed, equalled. 
The hotel service is perfect, and the prices 
wonderfully moderate. A delightful string 
orchestra plays during lunch and dinner. 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC 
COMPANY 



26th Consecutive Quarterly Dividend on First 
Preferred Stock 

The regular dividend, for the three months 
ending January 31st, 1921, of $1.50 per 
share, upon the full-paid First Preferred 
Capital Stock of the Company will be paid 
on February 15th, 1921. to shareholders of 
record at the end of the quarterly period. 
Checks will be mailed in time to reach stock- 
holders on the date they are payable. 

A. F. HOCKENBEAMER. 

Vice-President and Treasurer. 
San Francisco, California. 



PYR0-V0ID 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 
- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction iimaranteed or Monty Refunded 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

908 Market Street, at Powell 

San FrancUco 
D.ot. N. U E.t.bU.ked 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



In The World of Commerce 



All reports coming from all parts of the 
country seem to bear out the statements that 
are being sent from New York to the effect 
that we are on the up-grade and that liqui- 
dation and deflation is bringing about better 
times. It is true that there is an increased 
unemployment but, so far, this unemploy- 
ment seems to be the result of discharges 
which have taken place in industries made 
active through the war and its necessities. 
Thousands of men of the country that have 
been employed in mechanical pursuits have 
been discharged and for these it is a period 
of adjustment which is rather difficult to 
bear. Many of these came from the country 
or small town districts and have become 
accustomed to the life of cities as well as 
to the extravagances that go with the high 
wages they have been receiving. Unfor- 
tunately, on account of the rapidity with 
which events have shaped themselves many 
of the war industries have not been changed 
into industries catering to the art of peace. 
In some instances large shipbuilding con- 
cerns have been forced to discharge num- 
bers of men, solely on account of this fact. 
New contracts were few and far between and 
repair work was not as plentiful as might be 
expected. In other instances, the slackness 
was taken advantage of to reduce forces and 
thus get rid of a supply of hands not efficient 
enough to warrant high wages. In still other 
instances, the owners of works of various 
kinds have found it a more effective way of 
bringing their plants to an efficiency basis 
with the idea of starting afresh on the Ameri- 
can or "open shop" plan. It is gratifying to 
note that in many plants the men themselves 
have suggested that wages be lowered in 
order to allow the manufacturer to meet the 
increasing competition from Europe. 

As far as ship building is concerned, there 
must be a readjustment as to wage or the 
American builder of vessels will have to go 
out of business. He has to meet the price 
per ton of the English builder and this, 
under the present wage, he is utterly unable 
to do. But, even in these lines there is an 
improvement and business is in better shape 
than three months ago. 

In general business there is comment on 
the fact that failures that were scheduled to 
occur in December did not occur. The 
manufacturers and wholesalers have been 
carrying a great many customers who could 
not find help where they naturally expected 
to get it — at the banks. 

It is a question whether this is an un- 
mixed blessing. It may be, that, later on, a 
weeding out process will have to take place 
and the inevitable readjustment brought 
about. But for the moment there is con- 
gratulation. 



The process of business restoration is very 
likely to be slow and steady, a very good 
thing for the country. In some lines there 
is still a downward movement of prices. 

The export situation is no better than it 
has been for a month. 



SHIPPING.— The latest addition to the 

steamships plying between New York and 
the Pacific Coast is the Williams line. This 
company enters this trade with four new 
ships. Two of these are of 8000 tons and 
two of I 1,000 tons. They are the Willfaro, 
Willpolo, Willsolo, and Willhilo. The com- 
pany has established offices in San Francisco. 

There are conferences going on in New 
York between the shipowners composing the 
American Steamship Owners' Association 
and the various officers of the unions, repre- 
senting the men who man the vessels. The 
owners are attempting to bring about a modi- 
fication of the wage schedule, especially that 
in regard to overtime. The ship owners are 
laboring under a disadvantage as regards 
meeting the English in competition. All 
working arrangements, except one, expire on 
May I, and it is in view of that fact that 
the conferences are being held. The Pacific 
Steamship Association has taken the lead in 
wage reductions. The report is that the 
Pacific Association will abrogate all con- 
tracts on February 8. New scales will then 
be negotiated with the officers and men. All 
ship owners have come to the conclusion 
that it is within the power of the men to 
arrange matters so that employment may be 
continued and competition be made possible, 
otherwise there must be a gradual cessation 
of American activity on the high seas. 

The slump in export and import trade has 
affected the shipping interests adversely and 
there is not the activity there should be 
among the steamship companies. It cannot 
be said that San Francisco is any differently 
situated in this respect than are scores of 
other American ports. In fact, the dullness 
in export and import is a world-wide trouble 
and is part and parcel of the great economic 
readjustment now taking place. 



INSURANCE.— The Aetna Life and its 
affiliated companies, according to the state- 
ment of President Bulkeley and his associ- 
ate officers, for the year 1920, has aggre- 
gated, less re-insurance, about $80,0C0,000. 
This is a wonderful showing. These figures 
are exclusive of the ocean marine business. 

All over the Eastern States and in the 
great manufacturing centers there has been 
a recrudescence of activity in securing riot 
and commotion insurance. With the dis- 
charge of men at textiles, and shipbuilding 



January 29, 1921 

centers the fear of damage through civil 
commotion is growing and the business of 
protecting those who fear is making rapid 
strides. Luckily, for the great metropolitan 
industrial districts of the bay region about 
San Francisco, very little of such fear exists 
although it must be admitted there have 
been, especially in San Francisco, a number 
of aggravated assaults on men who cared to 
return to work under the American plan in 
metal working plants. Such assaults, unless 
punished properly, are likely to encourage 
the lawless and from attacks on individuals 
to attacks in order to damage plants where 
individuals work is only a short and logical 
step. 

As one of many indications of a better 
lone in all lines is the fact that the real 
estate committee of the Metropolitan Life 
has authorized loans and extensions amount- 
ing to over ten millions of dollars. Indicative 
of the help this will give the housing prob- 
lem it may be said that in loans made in 
various States — following its plan to loan 
for small houses and low-priced apartments 
— loans were made for the building of forty- 
three dwellings, eighteen in Kansas, ten in 
Missouri, eight in Florida, two in North Caro- 
lina, three in New York, and one each in 
Georgia and Idaho. The average cost was 
a trifle over five thousand dollars. Loans 
on business buildings were three in New- 
York, one each in Georgia, North Carolina 
and Tennessee, the total being $3,786,400. 



MINING. — The up grade in mining is still 
noticeable and a greater degree of confi- 
dence is manifested everywhere. The Tono- 
pah Divide is shipping ore regularly at the 
rate of fifty tons per day. The product 
averages $30 per ton. The grade of ore is 
improving. There is activity in all other 
Nevada districts. Undoubtedly, with the re- 
sumption of better times, in all lines of busi- 
ness there is to be renewed activity in all 
branches of mining, especially if the miner 
is to have the promised legislative help from 
Congress. 



ANNUAL MEETING 
THE JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS 

The regular annual meeting of the 
stockholders of the Joshua Hendy Iron 
Works will be held at the office of the 
Corporation, No. 75 Fremont street. 
San Francisco, California, on Tuesday, 
the 8th day of February, 1921, at the 
hour of 10 o'clock A. M., for the pur- 
pose of electing a Board of Directors 
to serve for the ensuing year, and the 
transaction of such other business as 
may come before the meeting. 

CHAS. C. GARDNER. 

Secretary. 

Office: 75 Fremont Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



January 29. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



Dog Eat Dog 



THE PROFITEERING while prices were 
soaring, and the disgraceful welching 
when the slump came, are making the 
business community look at itself somewhat 
dubiously. Does it pay to be slippery and 
crooked? Would the Golden Rule be not 
preferable? Cannot honesty be made the 
ruling policy instead of contemptible 
trickery? 

Some good may come out of the intense 
bitterness over the cancellation of contracts, 
when prices begin to tumble. 

A spokesman of the National Retail Dry 
Goods Association has this to say of the can- 
cellation scandals: 

Merchants and wholesalers will 
agree, I am sure, that no one has been 
the gainer by these practices. One 
season it is the buyer who has the upper 
hand and disregards his orders, causing 
loss to the wholesaler or manufacturer. 
The next season it is the seller's turn, 
and there is just as much contract vio- 
lation. In this see-saw there is no posi- 
tive profit to either party, because an 
advantage one year or month is wiped 
out by a reversal of conditions the next 
season. When the peak of such prac- 
tice was reached last year, both buyer 
and seller came to realize, I think, how 
profitless the whole arrangement was, 
and both are now determined to effect a 
change. 

It is scarcely necessary to repeat the 
case for the retailer who is accused of 
unjustified cancellation. The retailer 
simply answers such a charge by .stating 
he was compelled to order goods far in 
excess of his requirements through the 
false representations of salesmen and 
others in more responsible positions. A 
salesman would advise placing an order 
for double the usual amount so as to 
make sure of delivery of the half which 
was needed. Another salesman would 
come along with the information that 
the competing house was not able to 
ship goods, and an order therefore 
ought to be placed with him. Then, 
with a rush, all these goods were de- 
livered, and order books were searched 
to reveal back orders that could also be 
filled. This misrepresentation is what 
the retailer cites as his excuse for can- 
cellation, and he also describes the loose 
way contracts were considered when the 
market belonged to the seller. He 
charges that goods were shipped to spot 
buyers, willing to pay more for them 
than the concerns to which they right- 
fully belonged. 



This is merely a summary of the 
case of the retailer, but it indicates 
there is something to be said on both 
sides. It also shows that, whenever 
the market has gone one way or the 
other in the past, either buyer or seller 
has taken advantage of the situation. 
Looks like a case of "dog eat dog." 



THE RAILROAD CASH EMERGENCY 

The report of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission that the $300,000,000 revolv- 
ing fund provided in the Transportation 
act for use during the transition period be- 
tween Federal and private control is nearly 
exhausted has resulted in a good deal of 
speculation in railroad circles as to what 
steps will be taken to provide immediate 
financial relief for many of the carriers 
which are in need of money. 

Through the ruling of the Controller of 
the treasury, which automatically blocked 
the advance payment of funds on account of 
financial settlements of standard return due 
the roads for the extended guarantee period, 
many railroad corporations now find them- 
selves severely cramped for cash. 

Many of them, on the assumption that 
payments would be made as they were made 
during the period of Federal control, saw a 
good opportunity to use some surplus cash in 
paying off the back pay which resulted from 
the last wage award by the Railroad Labor 
Board. When the Controller of the treasury 
announced that payments on extended guar- 
antee account could only be made when final 
agreements between the roads and the Gov- 
ernment regarding settlement were reached, 
these carriers found themselves in unen- 
viable position. 

Bills have been introduced to amend that 
section of the Transportation act which has 
proved the stumbling block for advance pay- 
ments, but no immediate relief for the roads 
is expected from this source, as the matter 
must be considered and passed upon by both 
houses and may meet with opposition and 
delay. Because of this it is the opinion in 
some quarters that the action which has been 
started in Washington by the railroads show- 
ing just what their position is may be a pre- 
lude to emergency legislation which will re- 
sult in the production of the money which 
the roads must have. 

It has even been suggested that a continu- 
ation of the revolving fund may be asked, 
but this is not meeting with particular ap- 
proval. Conservatives are inclined to feel 
that with the termination of the extended 
guarantee penod. August 31. 1920. Govern- 
ment operation of the roads ceased and that 



legislation which will be a plea for further 
Governmental assistance will not be popular. 
On the other hand there are those who 
champion the cause of the amendment of 
the Transportation act to make lawful the 
advance payments on the extended guaran- 
tee. These moneys are due the roads, they 
say, and it is only a technicality in the law 
that now stands in the way of such payment. 



AMERICA'S FINANCIAL STRENGTH 

The satisfactory year-end financial settle- 
ment in the United States has impressed the 
moneyed world. There was no money mar- 
ket disturbance though American railroad 
and industrial corporations borrowed more 
than $3,100,000,000 through the sale of 
bonds, notes and stocks. 



KEEP WARM WATER 

In cold weather the water in the radiator 
is cooled more than necessary, cutting down 
efficiency of the motor. To avoid this con- 
dition place a piece of leatherette on front 
of the radiator about one-third up from the 
bottom ; when very cold about one-half. 



Patience — You say that girl you intro- 
duced me to appeared in a farce once? 

Patrice — Yes, she did. 

Patience — How did you know? 
- Patrice — She showed me her marriage 
certificate. 



We Specialize in 

Broken Hills 

and 

Con. Virginia 



And other 



Adhve Nevada 
Mining Issues 



Listed on the 



San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Your business and inquiries solicited 



G. E. Arrowsmith & Co. 

Members S. F. Stock Exchange 

117 Rues Bldg. 
San Francisco. Cal. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29, 1921 




ociot 




— Mrs. Stetson Winslow announces the 
engagement of her daughter. Miss Marie 
Louise Winslow, to Mr. Sidney Van Wyck 
Peters of Portland. The wedding will take 
place in the spring. Miss Winslow is a 
granddaughter of one of the pioneer mer- 
chants of the city, the late Mr. John B. 
Stetson, of the firm of Holbrook, Merrill & 
Stetson. She is a niece of Mrs. Robert 
Oxnard and Mr. Harry Stetson. Her sister 
is Mrs. Algernon Gibson. Miss Winslow made 
her debut two seasons ago, and last summer 
she spent in Paris with her aunt, Mrs, 
Oxnard. Mr. Peters comes from a San 
Francisco family, the Van Wycks. His 
mother was Miss Frances Van Wyck, a 
daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Sidney 
Van Wyck, who were leaders of the Southern 
set of the city. Mr. Peters is a son of Mr. 
and Mrs. William A. Peters of Seattle, the 
former a well known lawyer. 

— Two California boys at Harvard were 
recently appointed literary editors of the 
Harvard Advocate. They are Robert Cam-- 
eron Rogers, a sophomore at the college, 
and his brother, Sherman Skinner Rogers, a 
junior. They are sons of the late Robeit 
Cameron Rogers, the writer, and grandsons 
of Mrs. Charles Fernald of Santa Barbara. 
Their inherit their talent from their father, 
who achieved fame as a poet with "The 
Rosary." Robert Cameron Rogers has 
written the official class song of the class of 
'23 at Harvard. 











Our Entire 
Stock °f 

Exclusive 
FURS 

at Reductions 
Ranging up to 
^0 per cent. 






LOUIS GASSNER, Inc. 

1 1 2 Geary Street 





— Society is looking forward with much 
interest to the opening of the California polo 
season at Del Monte this week. It is antici- 
pated that a large number of the polo set 
from San Francisco and San Mateo will be 
down in force. There are also a number of 
visitors from the East, Northwest and 
Canada who take special interest in polo. 
The International tournament will run until 
the end of next week and the annual Del 
Monte tournament is scheduled for March 
19 to April 3. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Samuel F. B. Morse en- 
tertained a gay party in the palm grill at 
the Hotel del Monte on Friday evening. 
Among those at dinner, with dancing fol- 
lowing, were Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hill Vin- 
cent, Mr. and Mrs. Francis McComas, Mr. 
and Mrs. Byington Ford, Mrs. John F. 
Neville and Capt. H. H. Holmes, the promi- 
nent polo expert, who is here from the East. 

— The Palm Grill at Hotel del Monte was 
the scene of many gay parties over the week- 
end. At one table Mr. and Mrs. Alvah 
Kaime entertained at dinner Mr. and Mrs. 
Daulton Mann, Miss Elizabeth Carrere, Miss 
Elena Folger, Capt. J. Andrews and Eric 
Pedley. 

— Mrs. Edward Eyre gave a tea Friday 
for Mrs. William F. Timlow of New York, 
who is visiting her mother and sister, Mrs. 
James Carolan and Miss Emily Carolan. 

— There is a rumor in Washington that 
Governor Frank Lowden of Illinois will be 
the next ambassador to the Court of St. 
James. The post opens many interesting 
social opportunities for the ambassador's 
family, and should Governor Lowden receive 
the appointment, Mrs. Lowden and their 
daughters will lead unusually interesting lives 
for the next four years. Mrs. Lowden was 
Miss Florence Pullman, a sister of Mrs. 
Frank Carolan, and has visited Mrs. Caro- 
lan at Burlingame. One of the Lowden 
daughters is named for Mrs. Carolan. They 
the attractive girls, and are members of the 
young society set of Chicago. 

— Col. Charles N. Black has arrived from 
New York and is at the University Club. He 
is here for a few weeks' visit, but plans to 
return to San Francisco next year to make 
his home. Colonel Black lived here several 
years and he and his daughter. Miss Marie 
Lo.uise Black, now Mrs. Alan Lowrey, were 
great favorites in society here and at Bur- 
lingame. Mrs. Willard Drown gave a dinner 
Monday evening at her home in Washington 
street for Colonel Black and other entertain- 
ments are planned for him. 



— Cards of sympathy are being sent to 
Mrs. Herbert Newhall in Boston for the death 
of her mother-in-law, Mrs. Charles Newhall 
of Brookline, Mass. The late Mrs. Newhall 
was an aunt of Mr. Frederick Watriss of 
New York, who, with Mrs. Watriss, was at 
the Fairmont for several days and left last 
week for Santa Barbara. Mrs. Herbert New- 
hall, who was Miss Marjorie Bull, daughter 
of Commodore and Mrs. James H. Bull of 
this city, has been living in Boston since the 
death of her husband a few months ago. 
For several years after her marriage she 
lived in Brookline. 

— Col. and Mrs. Lincoln Karmany, who re- 
turned last week from the Orient, are going 
back to China within a few weeks. Colonel 
Karmany has been' ordered to Peking for 
duty and they expect to make their home 
there for some time. Coloney Karmany has 
returned to his station at Mare Island and 
Mrs. Karmany has gone for a short visit to 
Pebble Beach, where she has a house. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Hobart have pur- 
chased a house in Pacific avenue and re- 
cently took possession of it. They have lived 
at Menlo Park for several years but will now 
spend most of the time in town. Mrs. Ho- 
bart gave a luncheon Friday for about a 
dozen friends who had the opportunity of 
seeing the new home for the first time. 

—Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Girvin of Menlo 
Fark have taken up their residence at the 
Hotel del Monte for the winter months. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John Drum gave a dinner 
at their Burlingame home on Thursday even- 
ing and had as guests Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Foster Dutton, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas East- 
land. Mr. and Mre. Joseph 0. Tobin, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Scott and a few others. 

— Mrs. Gaillard Stoney will give a lunch- 
eon on Thursday for Miss Mary Phelan at 
the Stoney residence in Jackson street. 

Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 











Buy Now— 

True thrift is always wise, but 
if the public refuses to buy 
the things they need now, 
they are stopping up the 
channels that feed and clothe 
us all. If you won't buy the 
things the other fellow makes 
and handles, he can't buy the 
things you make or handle. 
That is reasonable, is it not? 

Willard 9 s 

Geary Street 

Between Grant and Stockton 











January 29. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



— The Francisca Club has established a 
"club day" every Wednesday. On that day, 
a special luncheon is served and members 
invite their friends and many of them play 
bridge in the afternoon. It is the only day 
that cards may be played in any part of the 
club, and it is especially enjoyable on that 
account. 

Last Wednesday there were a number of 
luncheons and bridge parties. Mrs. Augus- 
tus Taylor was one of the hostesses and had 
among her guests Mrs. Latham McMullin, 
Mrs. George Lent, Mrs. Atholl McBean, Mrs. 
Julian Thorne and several others. 

Mrs. George Tyson entertained Mrs. 
James A. Black, Mrs. William G. Henshaw, 
Mrs. Henry Rosenfeld, Miss Carrie Nichol- 
son, Mrs. William J. Shotwell and a few 
more. 

Others at luncheon were Mrs. William R. 
Sherwood, Mrs. Stuart Rawlings, Mrs. Anna 
Voorhies Bishop, Mrs. Edgar Preston, Mrs. 
James V. Coleman, Mrs. Dan Volkmann, 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain, Mrs. Grove P. 
Ayres, Mrs. P. McG. McBean and Mrs. 
Henry Kiersted. 

— Cabot Brown, who has been visiting 
his parents, Dr. and Mrs. Philip King Brown, 
for the winter, left on Sunday for the East, 
where he will enter Harvard University for 
the study of medicine. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Griffin Henshaw 
left Monday for New York to join Mrs. Alia 
Henshaw Chickering, and the group will sail 
early in February for Europe to be away sev- 
eral months. 

— Col. and Mrs. Thomas Rees and their 
daughters. Miss Margaret and Miss Frances 
Rees, will leave for Europe in March. They 
will go by way of the Panama canal and will 
travel on the continent for several months. 

— An engagement of interest to San Fran- 
cisco and Marin society, as well as to east 
bay circles, is that of Miss Lucretia McNear 
and William Thomas of Berkeley. The 
bride-elect is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
E. B. McNear of San Rafael, and a graduate 
of the University of California with the class 
of 1919. 

— After enjoying dinner at Del Monte 
Lodge at Pebble Beach, Mr. and Mrs. S. F. 
B. Morse, Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Lapham. Mrs. 
Charles Blyth and Francis McComas made 
up a dancing party in the Palm Grill. 

— Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Goodfellow of 
Fresno have purchased additional land at 
Pebble Beach where they will construct a 
forest lodge. 

— An interesting San Francisco party at 
Del Monte over the week-end were Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert J. Dibblee and their two charm- 
ing daughters, the Misses Polly and Peggy 
Dibblee. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Richard McCreery left 
England several days ago and are en route 
to their home in Burlingame. Mrs. Mc- 
Creery, who has been in London and Paris, 
left here last April. 



— Complimenting Mrs. Stuart Rawlings, 
who recently returned to San Francisco from 
New York and Washington, Mrs. Spencer 
Buckbee entertained at a handsomely ap- 
pointed luncheon Tuesday at her home in 
Clay street, the guests being former college 
mates of Mrs. Rawlings, many of whom have 
been feting her since her arrival. Among 
those invited to the luncheon were Mrs. 
William R. Sherwood, Mrs. George Quincy 
Chase, Mrs. Clarence Oddie, Mrs. Adolph 
Graupner, Mrs. William Shea and Mrs. Del- 
mar Smith Clinton. 

— Mrs. Edward G. Schmiedell has issued 
invitations to a bridge tea February 4. 

— A gay week of social affairs was closed 
with a large dinner dance given an Saturday 
evening by Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W- Brad- 
ley at their home on Pacific avenue. The 
season's debutantes were the guests of honor 
and the hostess was assisted in receiving by 
her two charming nieces, the Misses Ruth 
and Mary Davis, daughters of Judge and 
Mrs. John H. Davis. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Harold Mann gave a din- 
ner Wednesday evening for Mr. and Mrs. 
George Whitaker, who have recently re- 
turned from the Orient. The other guests 
were Mr. and Mrs. George Romanovsky, Mr. 
and Mrs. Gustave Knecht, Mr. and Mrs. 
Alfred Ghirardelli, Mrs. Dahl and Mr. 
Graeme McDonald. 

— Miss Margaret Buckbee, the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Buckbee, and Miss 
Barbara Sesnon, two of the season's debu- 
tantes, were complimented guests at a tea 
given by Miss Catherine Stoney on Saturday 
afternoon in the Palm Court of the Palace 
hotel. 

— The auxiliary board of the Girls' Recre- 
ation and Home Club is working hard for 
the sale of the tickets and tables for the 
card party to be held on Tuesday evening, 
February I, at the Fairmont hotel. Mrs. 
Ferdinand Thieriot is president of the aux- 
iliary board. 



DOES THE PUBLIC LIKE JAZZ? 

To determine an accurate answer to this 
question, which while one must admit has its 
enthusiasts, also has an opposition of those 
that prefer nothing but the classics, it is but 
necessary to see and hear "The Three White 
Kuhns and Mary." These famous musicalists, 
the pioneer artists who first introduced the 
bass viol to musical oddities, who, with the 
jazz banjo, the guitar, and mandolin, have 
charmed the ears of thousands from the 
Pacific to the Atlantic coast, who have 
played over the Orpheum and Pantages cir- 
cuits in every principal city in the United 
States, have won the plaudits of San Fran- 
cisco and have made the Techau Tavern, 
where they are nightly pleasing patrons, a 
rendezvous for those who love to dance and 
hear the olden melodies and the latest hits, 
played in an entirely distinctive manner. 
Miss Saylor's Chocolates, the last word in 
bon-bons, continue to vie with Murad Cigar- 
ettes in prizes for lucky dances, but why not 
with such selective gifts as prizes, and with- 
out competition withal. Techau Tavern also 
offers a very beautiful revue which is really 
different. For luncheon, tea or dinner, and 
after the theatre, this inimitable restaurant 
offers an enchanting environment that defies 
duplication. 



PLEASURABLE CAFE MARQUARD 

Thoughts of the dinner which one can 
enjoy at Cafe Marquard banish all gloomi- 
ness these moist days in San Francisco. 
Those special fete dinners like the Festa 
Napoli the other evening for $2.50 are a 
great boon to people who desire the best of 
physical comforts, as well as the delights 
of dancing, music of the best, and entertain- 
ment by the brightest talent. 

The new Fashion Revue of 1921 at Cafe 
Marquard with Bert E. Fiske's famous band 
and the Paramount Melodists is a much- 
appreciated attraction. So are the Wheel of 
Fate and the lucky prize dances. 



Dr. Louis T. Cranz and Dr. Lester 1i. Cranz 

'Doctors of Dental Surgery 

oAnnounce the formation of a co-partnership 

Effeclive February the firs! 

nineteen hundred and twenty-one 



Physicians 'Building 
516 Sutter Street 



Suite 504-506 
Phone Garfield 224 




Would Ton Preserve Tour Lustrous Eyes? 

Use Murine Eye Remedy 

No Dressing Table Complete Without 
salve Murine As An Eye Tonic uauia 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29. 1921 




faornohilQ 



Punctures, Blowouts, and Cuts 

There is no hard and fast rule for avoid- 
ing punctures. But you can keep a puncture 
from ruining the whole tire. Don't run on a 
deflated tire. If you are unfortunate enough 
not to have demountable rims or even a 
spare casing or tube, stop short. Better take 
off the tire and run a short distance on bare 
rim, than continue to run on a deflated tire. 

Blow-outs can be traced to a number of 
causes. 

You may have bruised your tire last week, 
or last month, and even though the tread 
shows no signs of being injured, the inside 
fabric was broken and every revolution 
after that weakens the fabric, and a blow- 
out follows. 

Overloading puts too much extra strain 
on the tire — a blow-out may result. 

Under-inflation places a strain on the tire 
by bending the sidewalls and breaking the 
fabric. This never occurs if tire is properly 
inflated. 

Watch for cuts in the thread. 

Don't neglect the small, apparently unim- 
portant ones. They will not remain unim- 
portant. 

Water will enter through cuts and rot the 
fabric. Sand and grit will work in between 
the rubber and the fabric, and in a short 
time will loosen the tread. 

Examine the treads from time to time. 
Small cuts should be filled with a good tire 
dough as soon as they are discovered. 

Proper Care of Tubes 

Ninety per cent of tube troubles are due to 
pinching from improper application of the 
tires to the rim. Either a flap gets misplaced, 
a tire tool gets jammed against the tube or 
the beads of the case catch it at some place 
where it is creased. The result may be 
merely a pin-hole puncture or the pinch may 
be large enough to blow the casing off the 
rim. Practically all instances of a tube 
letting go inside the case, without outside 
evidences of injury, are due to this cause, 
or to a bruise break in the fabric pinching 
the tube. 

When a tube is put in a case it should be 
lightly inflated and the hand slipped around 
inside the case to feel that there are no 
wrinkles. The flap, if any, should be put in 
position in the same way. After the case is 
on and before final inflation, the bead should 
be raised all around with a tire tool to allow 



the tube to escape into place if the beads are 
pinching it anywhere. See that the lugs. 
if used, move freely up and down and the 
valve stem likewise. Attention to these par- 
ticulars prevent subsequent trouble. 

Many tire experts agree that more than 
half of the number of tire troubles are due 
directly or indirectly to underinflation. As 
it is, in the case of the pneumatic tire, not 
the rubber but the air which carries, sus- 
pends and cushions the weight of the ve- 
hicle — everything, of course, depends on 
having as much air as possible in the tire 
tube, without approaching the breaking 
point of the rubber at the weakest point of 
the tube. Every molecule of air which can 
be safely held in place in the tube helps to 
do the work for which the tire is employed. 
Incidentally, it keeps tube and casing in the 
most desirable form, to which they are de- 
signed, and holding them rigidly, offers 
stones, nails and other road sundries such 
resistance as is needed to make the impact 
harmless. 

Pointers on Oiling 

Make sure your oil gauge is free to move, 
as a wrong indication is fatal. Sometimes 
the wire is bent and the gauge does not fall 
as the oil is used up. The inexperienced 
driver does not realize this and his engine 
runs dry. 

A gauge which can be reached by hand is 
better, since it may be moved up and down 
to see if it is free. It gives a striking object 
lesson when the oil base has not been 
cleaned out for several thousand miles. On 
pushing the float down into the heavy oil 
muck at the bottom it stays there, showing 



the need of a thorough cleaning. 

Few people realize that oil deteriorates 
under heat and that the spoiled oil in the 
crankcase thickens, accumulating carbon 
from the cylinders and making a thick, pasty 
mess that will not pass through the pump. 

When necessary to change the oil, say 
every thousand miles, it should be drained 
out carefully. Some of the muck remains 
and mixed with fresh oil, reducing its lubri- 
cating qualities. This is unavoidable unless 
the crankcase is removed for cleaning. 

It is dangerous practice to put kerosene 
into the crankcase and then to run the engine 
to cut the muck and so drain it out with the 
kerosene. The bottom of the oil base is 
covered with grit, metal chips, and other fine 
grinding material which will be stirred up 
and forced into the bearings. To avoid this 
remove the oil base and clean by hand. 

Driving Through Mud 

Driving in deep mud is not difficult if good 
judgment is used by the driver. Don't try 
to force the car in high gear, causing the 
wheels to spin. Shift to a lower gear, and 
take it slowly. If the car stops, reverse and 
back up for several feet. This will give you 
a chance to gain momentum to overcome the 
obstruction. Forcing the engine, and spin- 
ning the wheels, only tends to dig a hole. 

When the rear wheels get into a hole and 
it is difficult to obtain traction to pull out, 
back up and then shift gear quickly to take 
advantage of any forward momentum of the 
car. This forward drift of the car may be 
just enough to help you out. 

In driving over crater-like holes, watch 
the road and try to stagger the jolts. Don't 
let both wheels hit the obstruction squarely. 
The impact will not be so severe on the car. 
The effect is noticeable when crossing rough 
tracks at an angle. 

Backing up in mud has a tendency to un- 
lock the chain fasteners. Then when you 
drive along for a while, one or more of your 
chains may be lost. This can be avoided 
by putting a piece of wire around the lock- 
ing clamp. It is an easy matter to remove 
it with a pair of pliers. 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



January 29. 1921 

Always bear in mind that chains when in- 
stalled should be draped over the tire with 
the locking clamps toward the rear. Then 
the forward movement of the car does not 
tend to unlock them. Do not install too 
tightly, but allow enough freedom, so they 
can creep. This prevents cutting the rubber 
in one place. Cross links should be replaced 
immediately when broken, and in such a 
manner that the open part of the hooks is 
on the outside, and also so' that the new 
cross link member will lay flat on the tire 
without any twist. 

* * » 

Weak Magnets 

Weak magnets, in a magneto, or poor or 
dirty connections in the battery system, will 
cause a weak current to the points. As the 
voltage in the H. T. system is dependent on 
the voltage of the low tension system, it 
will readily be seen that if the supply is 
retarded at the base, for any reason, the igni- 
tion will not be satisfactory. Again, as the 
voltage in the H. T. system is also dependent 
on the speed with which the electrical con- 
dition of the conductors comprising the low 
tension system is changed, it will be seen 
that it is necessary to have the condenser 
in good working order. Also, in order that 
a good connection and a quick break may 
be made at the .points, it is necessary that 
they be cleaned and flush with each other, 
and that the gap be as small as is consistent 
with good working, so that the factor of 
inertia shall not play too great a part, thus 
retarding the quick making and breaking of 
the circuit. It is of first importance that all 
nuts be thoroughly tightened, all connections 
absolutely clean, particularly in the breaker 
box, collector rings and brushes. While dirt 
or oil does not interfere with the successful 
working of the H. T. system, as much as the 
low tension, it is, nevertheless, important that 
it be kept clean, as oil mixed with metallic 
dust will short one wire to another, causing 
pre-ignition. In the case of brass terminal 
screws on the distributor, it is particularly 
necessary to see that they are tight, as some- 
times two wires will be allowed to come close 
enough to short, but do not do so until the 
engine is put under load. Particular care 
should be taken, when diagnosing troubles 
on old cars, to make absolutely certain that 
trouble is what it seems. Probably fifty per 
cent of the troubles on this class of car are 
freaks, such as cracks in distributor covers, 
shorts by biuised insulations and. last and 
greatest, dirt. 

* * * 

Motor Trade Encouraged 
New York's twenty-fifth automobile show, 
just closed, was a great success and has done 
much to imbue the motor trade with confi- 
dence in the prospects for 1921. 

The financial side of the show, as ex- 
pressed in actual sales and orders for spring 
deliveries, has been much greater than many 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



of the sales managers had dared to hope 
for a few weeks ago. The unanimous ver- 
dict, as gathered from sales managers and 
other executives of the large motor com- 
panies was that the 1921 show has not only 
been a pronounced success in respect to at- 
tendance, but that it also indicated decidedly 
brighter times for the industry during the 
forthcoming months. 

Distributor Head. 

Do not overlook the distributor head. 
Occasionally remove it carefully and clean 
out the dust around the segments with gaso- 
line and a cloth. If the segments are very 
black use fine sandpaper and wipe off care- 
fully afterward. Finish with a little oil on 
finger. 

Breather Tube 

Hold your hand over the breathing tube 
occasionally while engine is running to see 
if air is passing out. On a new engine 
there is no apparent escape of gas. If there 
is much gas escaping, it shows that com- 
pression is leaking past the pistons, causing 
a serious loss of power. 

Storage Battery 

Don't forget that your storage battery is 
less efficient in cold weather. Also that a 
cold engine is difficult to turn over. Also 
that gasoline is hard to vaporize. All these 
make starting difficult. Keep your battery 
fully charged and prime the engine with 
care before attempting to start. 

Tire Chains 

Drape tire chains over the top of the tire 
with the hooks toward the rear. Then 
tighten as much as possible with the hand. 
Also see that clamps snap tight. Careful 



15 

installation will avoid loss of the chain and 
less tire wear. 

* * * 

Hose Connections 

The radiator hose connections in the water 
system of the motor should be frequently in- 
spected. Oftentimes these hose connections 
look fair on the outside, but they are bad 
on the inside. When the walls of the hose 
become decayed they have a tendency to 
swell and close, thereby preventing proper 
circulation. 

* * * 

Clean the Muffler 

About how often should a muffler be 
cleaned? A foul muffler will cut the .power 
of the engine down to almost one-half. The 
muffler should be taken apart and thor- 
oughly cleaned once a season. If it is 
clogged with carbon deposits the exhaust 
gases will not have free exit and undue back 
pressure will result. This back pressure pre- 
vents proper scavenging of the cylinders, 
and loss of power results. 



An Ounce of Prevention is 
Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where -regret. 

Let our expert automobile electricians 
inspect your starting, lighting and 
ignition systems regularly. It's the best 
insurance against a breakdown at an 
important moment. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

MASTER vAVTOMOBlLE ELECTRICIANS 
955 Po.t Street SAN FRANCISCO 



CAPITAL $2,000,000.00 



EARTHQUAKE - FIRE - AUTOMOBILE 

PATRONIZING AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS 
IS PRACTICAL PATRIOTISM 

The North River Insurance Co. 



Incorporated 1822 



Pacific Department 

266 Bush St., S. F. 



Harold Junker 

Manager 



THE HOME 

IN«UR*NCC COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Go. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 

TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29, 1921 




PLyE>ASURE>'S WAND 



Orpheum True to Form 

Despite the slogan of Martin Beck, "No 
headliners at the Orpheum," we must put 
Joe Laurie in that place this week. The 
little comedian does a number of really new 
things, and that gives him the lead in vaude- 
ville, for it's hard to find anything fresh and 
surprising in this field. The bill includes 
some good dancing, singing, animal acts and 
a delightful playlet, "Four Seasons and Four 
Reasons." 



"Obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

Beatrice Morgan, well known stock star, 
will bring a clever company in "Moonlight 
Madness," a bright one-act comedy. 

Bobby Randall "that Melodious Mirth- 
maker," will entertain in inimitable mono- 
logue. 

Flo Conroy and Edna Howard, clever 
girls, will engage in comedy patter and 
songs. 

Peggy Bremen and Brother promise plenty 
of thrills in "The Imp's Playground," a spec- 
tacle on unsupported ladders. 




Sparkling Farce at Alcazar 

"Marry the Poor Girl," by Owen Davis re- 
minds one of a shallow stream running 
swiftly along and suddenly dashing into the 
rocks where it splashes and bubbles and 
gurgles, shining in the sunshine, sparkling 
and frothy. The Alcazar company knows 
very well how to handle such a play and the 
walls of the popular O'Farrell street theatre 
ring with the mirth of the audience, as one 
absurd situation follows another. Emilie 
Melville is perfectly cast. Elwyn Harvey is 
pretty and spirited, Dudley Ayres his com- 
placent self, and the rest of the company 
all at their comedy best. 



California 

Goodness knows we see enough of 'em in 
the streets without having them featured at 
the theatre! "Silk Stockings" I mean. The 
name of this week's play at the California 
attracts many of us, however, and the play 
itself is well worth seeing, with beautiful 
Enid Bennett in the leading role so exquis- 
itely clad. 



Shaw and Maitland 

"Androcles and the Lion" is without ques- 
tion one of the wittiest of the great satirist's 
plays, and it is delighting the discriminating 
audiences of the Maitland playhouse this 
week. If the clever actor-manager keeps 
his promises, many are the good things still 
ahead of us; plays seen in no other theatre 
on the Coast are given at the artistic little 
Stockton street house, an unique institution. 



Orpheum's New Bill 

The coming week will be full of pleasant 
surprises at the Orpheum. 

William Seabury, rated among the fore- 
most exponents of Terpsichore will present 
his newest revue, "Frivolities," with six 
comely girls, himself and Joe Richman. The 
girls are all soloists and of established repu- 
tation. 

Signor Friscoe will furnish zylophonic 
harmony with four hammers — an entirely 
new act. 




■■SIGNOR FRISCOE" 
Who Coma to the Orpheum Next Week. 

Gordon's Circus, called "the speediest 
animal act in vaudeville," will be another of 
the attractions. 

De Wolf Girls, Georgette and Capitola, in 
their this week's success, "A Love Tour," 
will remain all of next week as the one hold- 



Mantell Fills Columbia 

Mr. Mantell says he in 



kes Sa 



rancisco, 

and certainly there is little doubt as to San 
Francisco liking Mr. Mantell. In the large 
and varied repertoire of the fortnight he is 
spending here, three characters stand out 
conspicuously for masterly portrayal — 
Richelieu, Macbeth, Lear. In these Robert 
Mantell has shown himself to be one of the 
great tragedians of the world. 



Alcazar Attractions 

The hilarious absurdities of "Marry the 
Poor Girl," at the Alcazar this week, will be 
succeeded commencing at next Sunday's 
matinee, by the first Coast presentation of 
"Anna Ascends," a picturesque blend of 
comedy and melodrama produced at The 
1 layhouse. New York, by William A. Brady, 
in which his daughter, Alice, Brady, is now 
starring on tour. Its heroine is a plucky 
Syrian girl who encounters trials, tribula- 
tions, and ardent romance as she ascends 
from obscurity as waitress in Said Coury's 
coffee house in New York's Turkish Quarter, 
to fame and fortune as a popular American 
novelist. 

"Our Wives," to follow Sunday, February 
6, is a brilliant comedy of the Bohemian 
world by Frank Mandel, sparkling with wit 
and ringing with wholesome laughter. Mr. 
Mandel, a former San Franciscan, has taken 
high rank among American playwrights 
through his great successes, "The High Cost 
of Loving," "The Five Million," and Geo. 
M. Cohan's current production. "Mary." 



Symphony Program 

For Sunday afternoon's program in the 
Curran Theatre the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra under the direction of 
Alfred Hertz has prepared a most interest- 
ing program equally balanced between new 
and old-established compositions. The new 
works to be offered for the first time in San 
Francisco are Glinka's overture, "Russian 
and Ludmilla" and Dohnanyi's Suite for 
Orchestra, Opus 19. The remainder of 
the program consists of the well known 
"Scheherazade" of Rimsky-Korsakow, which 
is one of the finest examples of musical story 
telling in modern music. 

At the next "Popular" concert to be given 
Sunday afternoon, February 6, Artur 
Argiewicz, the assistant concert master, will 
be the soloist, playing the brilliant Rondo 
Capriccioso for violin and orchestra of Saint- 
Saens. Other important numbers will be 
selections from Berlioz's "Damnation of 
Faust" and Wagner's overture to "Rienzi." 
The remainder of the program is made up of 
the overture to Massenet's "Phedre," Liszt's 
second Hungarian Rhapsody, "Dreams" of 
Wagner, Dvorak's "Humoresque" and "The 
Bee" of Schubert. 



ANOTHER SYMPHONY TRIUMPH 

Last Sunday's "popular" concert of the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, at the 
Curran was enjoyed by an overwhelming 
audience. There is never anything to be de- 
sired in the artistry of Alfred Hertz and his 
accomplished artists, but if possible they 



January 29, 1921 

reached a new standard of excellence on 
Sunday. 

The concert added to the orchestra's 
repertoire one of the lighter French opera- 
tive overtures. "Les Dragons de Villars" of 
Aime Maillart, and Grieg's "Norwegian 
Dances," Op. 35 The "Tannhauser" over- 
ture and the melodic "Sous les Tilleuls" in 
the Massenet suite of "Scenes Alsaciennes,'" 
were especially welcome and delightful. 

The second half of the program opened 
with the "Dream Pantomime" from Humper- 
dinclc's "Hansel und Gretel," which was fol- 
lowed by the Jarnefelt "Prelude" and two 
of Percy Grainger's settings of British folk- 
tunes: the poignant "Irish Tune From 
County Derry" and the rollicking jig, "Molly 
on the Shore." 

To say that Leader Hertz and his artists 
were applauded beyond description would be 
to understate the case. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



Herbert Bashford's Play 

Word comes from various quarters that 
Herbert Bashford's comedy. "Would You," 
which had its premier in San Francisco, is 
reaping a golden harvest, with Henry 
Walthal as star. 

Mr. Bashford's exceedingly clever comedy 
was played at the Maitland first. The recep- 
tion there accorded it by its discriminating 
patrons, convinced Mr. Walthal that the 
play would prove very successful. That 
expectation has already been realized. 
Crowded houses have welcomed Mr. Bash- 
ford's play in every city of the Northwest 
and Middle West where it has been pre- 
sented. 

Before long it will reach Chicago, and 
then face the decision of New York theatre- 
goers. A return tour to San Francisco will 
be made and the play perhaps filmed. Mr. 
Walthal is one of the bright stars of the 
screen. 

Mr. Bashford is as well known in jour- 
nalism as in literary circles, and very popular 
in both. In dramatic writing he has found 
his full metier. His plays are clean, de- 
liciously witty and replete with human 
nature, which appeals to all classes. Several 
of his plays have had long runs, and in fact, 
it may be said, that none has been a failure. 
He is now at the best period of a dramatist's 
career, where having won general recogni- 
tion, great successes come with rapidity. 
Like all fine dramatists, he has a fondness 
for verse and writes poetry of which any 
votary of the Muse might be proud. 




ALCAZAR 

THIS WEEK il»cn D»Tt«' Laughing Hit 

"MARRY I'll!' POOR GIRL" 

WEEK COM Ml XT SUNDA\ MAT.. JAN. 30 

Alice Bndy'i Latest Nc« York SmeMM 

"ANNA ASCENDS" 

,u Giri'waitreai who ascended to 
American Literary Fame Deapite Persecution 
by New York GaB| 

NEW ALCAZAR I OMPANi 

DUDLEY \\KI-s. ELWYN HARVEY 

SUNDAY MATINI Brilliant Corned] 

It. li.tnk M .iii.l. I . author of "High Com of Loving." 

•The Five Million." Mary." Etc. 

OIK WIVE S 

Sparkles with wit. Ring* with Laughter. 

Matinees. Sumlay. Thursday. Saturday. 

Teacher (to a class of Kentucky young- 
sters) — When the sun goes down in the 
west, what comes up behind those hills? 

Like a flash, a dozen hands were raised. 

"Moonshine!" chorused the twelve 
ycungsters. 



SYMphMY 

ORCHESTRA 

AtnutoHeRTZ Conductor. 

CONCERT SUNDAY 

CURRAN THEATRE -:- 2:45 P. M. 

PROGRAMME 
OrcTture, "BimUn k Ludmilla" CHnka 

( Finl timr in San Francisco) 

Suile. OjMM 1 1'ohnanyi 

(Finl time in San Francisco) 

Scheherazade Rimsk\-Korsakotv 

PRIl IS 50c to $1.00. Boxes and Lodge* $1.50. 



.SAMKRAHOSCO 



m -*Aw*t«.\.\.e- 



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SAMPLE DRESSES. j 
SUITS AND COATS 
AT WHOLESALE PRICES ! 


BARGAIN HEADQUARTERS no SHOP IN town UKE 

MISS JO'S 
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MISS JO'S DRESS SHOP 


Room. 361-363 PACIFIC BUILDING - 821 MARKET STREET 

ROY L NtUMANN *0.1«" 



Next Wgek— Starting Surday 

William Seabury & Co. 

r.ilurdil in B-saitillul nirla 

BEATRICE MOBfiAS I BOBBY KAMI. LI, 

De Wolf Girl* 

m a LOVE TOIR" 

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'Sigrior Frucoe' 

Will Entertain a Bit 



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MATINEE nAILY-Phone Doot 
Sealpfra' Tlci.sta Not HoDored 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29, 1921 



LIBRARY TABLE 



Not Much Literary Style 

"Pengard Awake" is a sort of Dr. Jekyll 
and Mr. Hyde" story, except, needless to 
say, it cannot hold a candle to Stevenson's 
tale, either in plot, construction or style. In 
fact, there is no particular style to Ralph 
Straus' method of telling a story. It is 
rather a poorly written psychological mys- 
tery, and runs in this way: Sir Robert 
Graeme, traveling in America with his sis- 
ter, visits a remarkable book store, the pro- 
prietor of which is the hero of the story. 
There is some haunting secret in the later's 
life, and his disappearances at times puzzles 
all his friends. A famous author, Hartley 
Sylvester, appears to be dogging Pengard's 
footsteps, and his pursuance brings about a 
great deal of unhappiness for Pengard. The 
two men resemble each other strikingly, and 
the situation is complicated by the fact that 
they are both in love with Graeme's charm- 
ing sister, Lady Rosamond. The final chap- 
ter is as full of surprises as the rest of the 
volume. 

"Pengard Awake," by Ralph Straus. D. 
Appleton & Co., New York. 



THE LITERARY HACK 

By Harold Seton 
Mary Maudlin's "Lullabyes,"— 

(I wrote it!) 
Zarah's "How to Hypnotize," — 

(I wrote it!) 
"On the Farm," by Silas Green, 
"Altar-cloths," by Chaplain Dean, 
"Etiquette," by Van der Veen — 

(I wrote 'em!) 

Stella Siren's "Throbs and Thrills" — 

(I wrote it!) 
Blackstone Bane "On Making Wills"— 

(I wrote it!) 
"Children's Games," by Betty Brown, 
"Coats of Arms," by Ivor Crown, 
"Parts of Speech," by Nita Noun — 

(I wrote 'em!) 

Greedy 's "Famous Chefs and Cooks" — 

(I wrote it!) 
Musty's "On Collecting Books" — 

(I wrote it!) 
"Household Remedies," by Blake, 
"Cowboy Days," by Broncho Jake, 
"Honesty," by Fraud and Fake — 

(I wrote 'em!) 

— From Judge. 



1633. In it Prynne advances the opinion 
that playacting and playgoing were immoral 
and in defiance of the Scriptures. While 
the book was going through the press Hen- 
rietta, King Charles's Queen, took part in a 
pastoral, and Prynne's enemies immediately 
construed his book as an attack upon the 
Queen's virtue. Prynne was arraigned in 
the Star Chamber, and after a year's im- 
prisonment was sentenced to have his book 
burned by the hangman, pay a fine of 
$25,000, to be expelled from Oxford and 
Lincoln's Inn, lose both his ears, and suffer 
perpetual imprisonment. While in prison 
Prynne issued a further pamphlet, and was 
again fined $25,000, pilloried, and made to 
lose such "stumps" of his ears as the hang- 
man had before spared. 



SCREEN DRAMA AND READING 

George F. Bowerman, librarian of the 
public library of the District of Columbia, 
says : 

"I am inclined to agree that the movie is 
something to be contended with in our 
American life. It has proved such a gold 
mine that it is being developed to a high 
degree and is omnipresent." 

While Arthur E. Bostwick of the St. Louis 
public library is more optimistic: 

"I am not at all pessimistic about the 
moving- picture. If those who are worrying 
about the moving-picture would recognize it 
as the greatest avenue of reaching the public 
devised since the invention of printing, we 
should have fewer futile efforts to counteract 
it, and more to direct it. It needs direction 
very badly. So far as I have seen, however, 
it encourages rather than discourages the use 
of libraries. Much of the increased use of 
specific books may be traced to reproduc- 
tions of those books, or allusions to them, on 
the screen." 



A Famous Book 

There is to be sold in London this week a 
copy of Prynne's "Histrio-Mastix, the 
Player's Scourge," which was printed in 



ENGLISH ACTORS' BOYCOTT 

As trade union boycotts are not at present 
very popular, the English actors' union, or 
Association, as it is called, is explaining why 
it has driven some theatrical managers out 
of business. Theatre lessees will have no 
dealings with managers boycotted. The 
Association has decided on a minimum wage 
of $15 a week, which seems very modest in- 
deed: but the Association explains that some 
English managers of barnstorming com- 
panies have been paying only $7.50 to their 
stars. Even that wretched stipend has not 
been assured. Chorus girls received only 
$1.75 a week. In order to save railroad 
fares, one crooked manager stranded his un- 
fortunate company every two or three weeks 
and repeated his tactics in a new field, until 



boycotted out of the theatrical business. 

The minimum wage of $15, it is hope, 
will save the provincial English actor from 
having to throw his suit case out of the 
window and shin down the rainpipe to es- 
cape his landlady. 



The Harr Wagner Publishing Company, 
San Francisco, has just issued a volume of 
verse entitled "Poems of the Golden West," 
by William Darwin Crabb. The most notable 
of the shorter poems are "Paradoxes," "A 
Rover," and "By-and-By." 



A SURE CURE FOR INSOMNIA 

By Jessie M. Thompson. 
She counted sheep and little lambs, a million 

head or more; 
She stared at mental pictures of the moun- 
tains and seashore; 
She whispered softly memory gems, repeat- 
ing o'er and o'er — 

While Jim was snoring on. 

She pattered to the pantry for a slice of 
buttered bread; 

Then did an India war dance on the floor 
beside the bed; 

She bound a towel icy wet around her throb- 
bing head — 

And Jim kept snoring on. 

She prayed that in her misery she'd be 

allowed to die. 
And fly away on snowy wings up to the 

starry sky; 
She punched her pillow, turned again, and 

then began to cry — 

But Jim kept snoring on. 

She listened to the kitchen clock beat out 

the hour of four; 
"Ah, me," she groaned in dire despair. "Will 

I sleep nevermore?" 
Then prayers forgot, most frantically, she 

tore her hair and swore — 

Still Jim was snoring on. 

She grabbed the tousled forelock of the man 

who'd been her choice. 
Jerked fiercely without mercy as she 
shrieked in awful voice, 
How in heaven's name, oh, creature, can I 
sleep with all this noise?" 

And Jim stopped snoring then. 

He sat up wrathfully and yelled, "Why is it, 

oh, you freak. 
You stay awake all night and try to keep 

me from my sleep?" 
And while he raved his wifie's eyes were 

closed in slumber deep — 

Noon found her sleeping on. 

The motto, sleepless readers, in my little 

yarn you'll see, 
When insomnia attacks you and all hopes of 

sleeping flee, 
Wake up all the rest the household, make 

them share your misery — 
And you'll sleep. 



The Secondary Boycott 



There appears to be nothing in the recent 
decision of the United States Supreme Court 
in the labor union boycott case that need 
cause apprehension on the part of members 
of farmers unions who are trying in a per- 
fectly legitimate way to get for their 
products a price that will cover the cost of 
production with a reasonable profit, says the 
Republican Publicity Association, through 
its president, Hon. Jonathan Bourne, Jr. 
The decision does not interfere with the 
exercise of the legitimate powers of a labor 
union or its members. The application of 
the same principles to the operations of 
farmers' unions, therefore, would not inter- 
fere with any undertakings farmers in gen- 
eral have in contemplation. If any organi- 
zation of farmers resorts to unlawful 
methods, it would be subject to punishment 
under the principles laid down in the labor 
union case, but there is no evidence of any 
general desire on the part of farmers to 
commit acts in violation of law. 

The section of the Clayton act which pro- 
tects labor unions in lawfully carrying out 
their legitimate objects, includes farm organ- 
izations in the same class. A decision that 



applies to one will apply to the other under 
the same circumstances. But there is no 
indication of intention on the part of farmers 
to resort to the methods used by some of the 
labor unions. 

So far as the recent decision of the Su- 
preme Court is concerned, labor unions are 
still protected in their right to strike and in 
the right of the members of the union to 
boycott the products of the concern against 
which they have struck. It is the secondary 
boycott that is held to be illegal — a boycott 
against a concern with which the strikers 
have had no dealings and against which they 
have no grievance except that the second 
concern deals with the establishment with 
which they have a quarrel. 

The injustice of the secondary boycott 
will be readily apparent. An extreme illus- 
tration is presented in the threat of transpor- 
tation unions to refuse to handle commodi- 
ties made in non-union shops. In other 
words, if this threat were carried into effect, 
a manufacturer of shoes, for instance, who 
fell out with his union employes and went on 
an open-shop basis, would find that trans- 
portation employes would refuse to handle 



his goods, even if he were paying higher 
than the union scale of wages and conduct- 
ing his business in a perfectly legitimate 
manner. 

Farmers do not propose anything like the 
secondary boycott. They have formed, and 
propose to continue to form co-operative 
organizations for the sale of their products, 
thus enabling them to seek the best mar- 
kets, sell their goods through their own 
agents, and prevent flooding the market to 
their own disadvantage. That is a line of 
activity in which they are protected by the 
Clayton act. The members of the farmers' 
union pool their own products, but they do 
not undertake to interfere with the right of 
other farmers to sell their own products if 
they wish. 



ENCOURAGING INDICATIONS 

Although the general business situation 
has changed but little during the past month, 
there are pronounced indications that the 
first shock of the depression is over. That is 
the opinion of Archer Wall Douglas, chair- 
man of the Committee on Statistics and 
Standards of the Chamber of Commerce of 
the United States in his monthly report on 
business conditions. Other prominent busi- 
ness men agree with Douglas in his optimistic 
predictions. 



SF 



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AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Aggregate Assets. 30th 
Sept. 1919 




$ 23.828,500.00 
16,375,000.00 

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$377,721,211.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

351 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian Slates. New Zealand, Fiji, Papua (New 

Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

London Office: 
29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 
Agents: 
Bank of California. National Assn.. Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



Head Office: 
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THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENG: NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7lh Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31. 1920 

Assets $69,878,147.01 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits 66.338,147.01 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2.540.000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund. _ $343,536.85 

OFFICERS 

IOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

\VM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCH<\MMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH COODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

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Demand for Improved Auto Ferry 
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Alameda Co. Automobile Trade 

Ass'n 
Oakland City Council 
Berkeley City Council 
H. E. Manwaring, Manager 

Palace Hotel 
Harry Annan, President S. F. 

Greeters 
A. F. Lemberger, Manager Motor 

Car Dealers Ass'n of S. F. 
Charles Stetson Wheeler 
Rolla V. Watt 

and thousands of individual car owners 



The Six Minute Ferry Co. is now ready 
to relieve this situation by the construction 
of 3 all steel 

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capacity eighty machines each. Plans are 
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A Limited Amount of Stock is Still Available 

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VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1921 



No. 6 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second- 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Company. 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year, $5.00. Foreign: One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

A noisy anti-cigarette mayor in Utah has been punched. 

Let's hope the fashion spreads. 



What a lot of money is worse than wasted every day in busi- 
ness by firms that mail "publicity stuff" to possible patrons. "Stuff" 
is a good name, for it. The money thus squandered, if put into 
newspaper advertising would bring merchants and manufacturers 
far better returns. 



No one is so ill-mannered as the man who is so sure of being 

a gentleman that he does not think it necessary to behave like one. 



Alameda has won the Navy Base, but San Francisco will get 

a large share of the shekels. 



San Pedro, the seaport for Los Angeles, is to be made a 

sort of auxiliary Navy Base — probably where the Whitehall row- 
boats, flat bottom skiffs can tie up. 



It means something when the Southern Pacific has to lay off 

1200 shop hands, for the corporation has never been a stingy 
employer, looking for a chance to cut down its great payroll. 



Senator Jack Inman of Sacramento has been teaching the 

Railroad Commission on how to "behave like gentlemen." Good 
idea — but has the Senator a certified diploma? 



Mr. Bourn ought to be able to buy a few more castles in 

Europe if Spring Valley can get $38,000,000 from San Francisco. 
Castles are going a begging these days. 



The Waiters' Union has swung into line with the organized 

defenders of the two accused police judges that the voters are trying 
to get rid of by the Recall. The more such defenders the surer the 
recall. 



The opposition to Charles E. Hughes for Secretary of State 

has not changed President Harding's intention to appoint him. 
Where does the opposition come from? We can't locate any of it 
out here in California. 

Many people think that the Spring Valley Company could 

afford to sell out to the city for half the price it demands, and then 
be away ahead on the transaction. Think what a soft snap the 
company has had all these years! 



The Japanese pact is to be passed up to Harding, announces 

Hearst. We might have added, "much to the sorrow of the bunch 
of politicians that has got hold of it and are hanging on for dear 
life, as a drowning man would to a straw. 



Denial of pardon to Brother Debs is much discussed. He 

should not have been convicted two years ago and got ten years, 
say his constituents. No! He should have been convicted 30 years 
ago and got life. He will be eligible for parole in 1922. 



Now it is announced that the police have orders to shoot 

first and then investigate if the supposed bandits are the real articles. 
Don't get hysterical, Mr. Chief of Police. That's one of the chief 
faults with our municipal government. It either loafs on the job 
or overdoes it. 



And now the farmers — according to Hearst — are roasting the 

Railroad Commission, for not letting them get their produce hauled 
free to market, where they could gouge consumers. Of all the 
merciless, profiteering pirates on earth the whining alfalfa bandit 
is the worst. The public has got that fellow's measure. 



Health Engmark, a Los Angeles chiropractor, in jail for 

violating the State medical laws, is on a hunger strike. This idea 
ought to be encouraged, as the taxpayers can save 50 cents a day 
on the prisoners, till they croak. But of course Herr Engmark will 
be tucking in the goulash long before that. 



Governor Stephens has opened his State-wide campaign on 

the tax fight with the statement that the corporations intend to regain 
control of the State government. Would that be such a terrible 
calamity? Look at the State budget now. 'Tis as big as the 
capital and expanding every minute like a balloon. 



The vice-president of the Pennsylvania Railroad declares 

that all the railroads in the country face bankruptcy, unless the 
National Labor Board's scale of wages for railroad shop hands be 
abrogated. We hope he is not foolish enough to think that argu- 
ment has any effect on the Labor Board. Railroads are not run 
for business but for "business agents.' 



Ambassador John S. Dunnigan can now come home from 

Washington, and attend to his duties as chief clerk of the Board of 
Supervisors, after his several years fruitless lobbying for the Navy 
Base at Hunter's Point. Auditor Tom Boyle should put on a force 
of extra clerks and figure out what Ambassador Dunnigan has cost 
San Francisco in salary and expenses of his log-rolling at Wash- 
ington. 

-Mountain Goat May Mother Hippopotamus" is one of the 



If labor be not a commodity, how comes it that the general 

slump lowers its price, like any article of merchandise. Please 
explain. Brother P. H. McCarthy, you have been handing out that old 
bunk on public platforms and in private sessions for twenty years. 



startling lines in the Evening Bulletin. Wonderful! Most wonder- 
ful! Why doesn't our enterprising contemporary devote a few scare 
heads to the Spring Valley Company's making a goat of San Fran- 
cisco on the purchase of its water rights and rusty pipes for 
$37,000,000? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 1921 



BLToBIALv 




One would have thought that the indictment 

Printing Trust Sued of so many profiteers and boycotters in large 

Eastern communities would have made the 

San Francisco offenders cautious but the contrary seems to be 

the case. 

The members of the printing trust in San Francisco are apparently 
more audacious and grasping than the Eastern profiteers, who are in 
danger of going to jail, besides being subjected to heavy fines. Do 
the heads of the San Francisco printing trust read the newspapers? 
Evidently not, or they would have learned the lesson of discretion 
from what is happening to trust tricksters in Chicago and New York. 
The newspapers have furnished all particulars, and everywhere 
except in our city the news of Eastern profiteers' indictment, has 
inspired gentry of their description with at least superficial respect 
of the anti-trust enactments. 

But in San Francisco, the printing profiteers have been so long 
in control of the field and have so carefully entrenched themselves 
against legal interference that such a contingency only excites their 
contempt. They forget that times change and the enforcement of 
the law is not always lax. 

Whether San Francisco will remain in the same old slough of 
industrial trickery, or make an example of profiteering tricksters, as 
Chicago and New York are doing, will be determined on February 
II, when the petition of the Overland Publishing Company for a 
permanent injunction against the printing trust comes up for hearing. 

On Wednesday last, the Overland Publishing Company was 
granted a temporary injunction against a number of persons whom 
it names as associated in the San Francisco printing trust, or co-oper- 
ating with it. 

The list of defendants as specified by the Overland Publishing 
Company includes: The Printers' Board of Trade of San Francisco, 
the Union Lithograph Company, the Periodical Press Room, Phillips 
& Van Orden Company, San Francisco Typographical Union No. 21. 
San Francisco Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union No. 24, 
Franklin Printing Trades Association, and the many individuals who 
are officers or members of the organizations. 

On Tuesday a strike of printers took place in the typographical 
department of the Overland Publishing Company. It was almost 
instantaneous and was in obedience to union orders that the men 
should stop work and walk out. Why? Because of hours, or wages, 
or some other usual cause of strikes? 

Not at all. Because the San Francisco Printers' Board of Trade 
desired to discipline the Overland Publishing Company and force 
that organization to join the printing trust. So the Overland Pub- 
lishing Company alleges in its petition asking for a permanent 
injunction. 

For a year past the San Francisco Board of Trade has been 
exerting pressure on the Overland Publishing Company to become 
associated in the printing trust, but the company has stoutly resisted 
all attempts to coerce it. The Overland Company has replied to the 
combination of profiteers that it preferred to conduct business with 
its clients in its own way, and was satisfied with its profits. It had 
no desire to cinch the public, as the printing trust is said to have 
done ever since it was banded together in its profiteering scheme. 

A hitch in the coercion plans of the printing trust was caused by 
the difficulty of moulding the typographical union to its will. If the 
trust could induce the union to strike whenever the trust desired 



independent printing shops could be put out of business at once. Not 
being dead sure of their omnipotence the trust halted in their 
aggressive campaign until they felt the ground firm under them. 
Evidently they have concluded that conditions are favorable now for 
driving independent printers out of the field by the assistance of 
printing trades. The slump in business has also spurred them to 
active measures against independent rivals. The trust has an 
insatiate maw for profits and if the volume of business is lessened 
the members become dissatisfied. The public, too, has been com- 
plaining of the operations of the trust and its pernicious influence 
in driving large printing contracts away from San Francisco. 

It is alleged by the Overland Monthly Publishing Company in its 
petition for an injunction that for the last three years members of 
the profiteering organization have met daily to consider all new 
contracts and proposals for printing in excess of $15 and have set 
upon the work prices grossly in excess of the amount necessary to 
yield a fair and reasonable profit. In plain words they have been 
gouging the public, and injuring the trade of San Francisco by a 
selfish combination, which comes within the scope of Federal prose- 
cution. That the United States authorities will take cognizance in 
this nefarious effort to destroy (he Overland Publishing Company's 
business is anticipated. 

Not only does the Overland Publishing Company ask for an injunc- 
tion against the printing trust, but it expects heavy damages for the 
sinister attempt to disrupt and destroy its business. It considers 
$75,000 damages, reasonable. The printing trust may have to dis- 
gorge some of its over-swollen profits in a way it never anticipated. 
The boomerang it flung at an independent rival, may be as disas- 
trous as that celebrated boycott of the Danbury hatters which ruined 
its conspirators. 



At Washington they are declaring that it will 
Eliminating Germany be impossible for Germany to meet the Allied 
demands. Everybody knows that, without 
going to Washington to find it out. The intention of France is to 
eliminate Germany, and of France and England to construct a new 
map of the world with all the other nations of the earth subordinate 
to either of them; for the two ancient rivals cannot be stars of equal 
magnitude in the future any more than in the past. Inevitably 
England and France will clash and new political alignments will 
keep the world at war. 

While that denoument is being approached America will lose the 
German market, we formerly possessed, as the Allied interests have 
decided to impose a tax of 12 per cent on all exports. If there be 
anything to export from impoverished Germany, the tax of 12 per 
cent will be added by the German manufacturers and will go into 
the prices to be paid by American importers. Thus America, which 
wrested victory from defeat for the Allies in a war in which she 
had only sentimental interest will find herself helping to pay the 
German indemnity. 

Well did the founders of our Federation agree that the safe 
course for the United States in her isolated independence would be 
"to avoid entangling alliances." 



From Palo Alto, California, comes to the 
Child Labor Faddists News Letter an appeal from a woman writer 

to "stop wearing out two million children" 
by improper child labor. We fail to see any cause for alarm on 
this subject, though the Palo Alto philanthropist asserts: "If we 
could see the children by the dawn's early light going in droves into 
factories" we should stop child labor. No doubt, but we never see 
such a sight out here in this land of sunshine and plenty. We 
don't see anybody endangering his or her health by going to work 
by the dawn's early light — not even our editorial selves. If we 
happen to awake a few hours or so before the noon's lurid light, we 
find ourselves right in the thick of the "maddening crowd," going to 
punch the time clocks. 



February 5, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Bryan's State Theology 

by Harvey Brougham. 



THE SUN of William Jennings Bryan's 
fame as the "matchless orator" has 
been waning for years in politics, but 
his old-fashioned theology has had consider- 
able vogue on the lecture platform. 

In his day Mr. Bryan may have been a 
marvel of finished eloquence, though to be 
candid, I have never seen proof of it. Many 
times and oft, have I sat respectfully atten- 
tive to his political oratory and I have in- 
variably come away with the query buzzing 
in my brain: "How did he mount the high 
steps of Fame's temple and get a front seat 
amongst the spell-binders of the world?." 
An excellent stump-speaker he undoubtedly 
is, and I can imagine a granger audience in 
Nebraska going into wild ecstasies over his 
platitudes, but students of the classics, in 
the years to come, will hardly turn from 
Cicero and Demosthenes to the bound 
speeches of "The Great Commoner." 

Critics of theology, which is Mr. Bryan's 
profitable side-line as a lecturer, are arising 
to declare that he is as flat, stale and un- 
profitable in the religious field, as the worldly 
wise have come to regard him in the field of 
politics. 

A writer in the Christian Century makes 
Brother Bryan's address to the students of a 
mid-western university the text of an admir- 
able sermon on the sin of underrating the 
knowledge and intelligence of a modern 
American audience. Every day in the year, 
and several times a day it is done by Ameri- 
can newspapers, which forget that the Nation 
is filled with excellent universities and every 
man who can read is not to be addressed as 
if his education had ended at the kinder- 
garten. America may have been a Nation 
somewhat lacking in advanced knowledge 
but that time is not now. The speaker or 
writer who assumes that he is addressing the 
narrow intelligence of groundlings should be- 
ware that he is not making an indecent exhi- 
bition of his own comparative ignorance. 

According to the frank critic of the Chris- 
tian Century, there were five thousand per- 
sons present when Bryan spoke on the 
"Claims of Religion on the Life of Youth." 
to a mid-western university audience. Three- 
fourths were actual students, or their rela- 
tives. The others were the faculty. It was 
an American audience of the best type. A 
lecturer should have been cautious how he 
addressed such an assemblage, but Bryan 
had so often satisfied mid-western crowds 
with banalities that he forged ahead on the 
principle that "where ignorance is bliss 'tis 
folly to be wise." His unsparing critic in the 
Christian Century remarks: 



"As I look back over many similar oppor- 
tunities afforded celebrated speakers to set 
the cause of religion squarely before the face 
of the college man, I do not remember ever 
having seen such a crowd, in such a recept- 
ive mood! One envied this rare spirit his 
chance to do valiant service for Christianity, 
that day. What came of it? The monkey 
talk! 

"How this good man could ever have 
gained the consent of his own mind to com- 
mit the almost incredible impertinence of 
reading the old misquotations, spinning the 
old yarns, and assailing 'Darwinism' in the 
presence of hundreds of youngsters who 
understood enough about evolution to know 
that the speaker knew nothing about it, 
whatsoever — yes; and in the presence of 
scientists who had made a life job of re- 
search in this field — how he could have done 
it, I do not understand; but he did it. He 
went further. 

"He deplored the subversive effects of 
science on Christian faith; explained to the 
students that science was the enemy of faith; 
exoriated scientific men, advanced scholar- 
ship, modern learning, and generally anathe- 
matised higher education. All this was by 
way of preface to a statement of his belief 
in the verbal inspiration of the Bible. Adam 
was the first man. He was made of the dust 
of the ground. The Bible said so. A con- 
siderable volume of water has passed under 
the bridge, in the realm of science, since Mr. 
Bryan first came out as a biologist. Prac- 
tically the whole theory of evolution has 
been rephrased during that time. 

"Of course, it used to make very little 
difference to the typical lecture audience 



whether Mr. Bryan was sure of his facts or 
not. But increasingly the American people 
have had opportunities to inform themselves 
about matters of a scientific nature, and the 
good man seriously underrates the intelli- 
gence of his audiences. 

"The total result of the Bryan address to 
his university audience was disgust on the 
part of religious people — both faculty and 
students — disgust over the speaker's intel- 
lectual immorality, to say nothing of the 
crass impudence displayed by such an exhi- 
bition of ignorance before an audience of 
that character. But the really serious fact 
about the performance resided in the effect 
produced upon the students who never go 
to church, manifest no interest in religion, 
and who think of Christian faith with as 
little claims as Mr. Bryan has of biology — 
which is next to nothing. 

"This type of student understands that 
Mr. Bryan is a widely known and generally 
recognized religious leader in the country — 
frequent spokesman before ecclesiastical 
conclaves, and a general defender of the 
faith. The student is informed, from this 
respected quarter, that, to be a Christian, he 
must repudiate that which his own eyes have 
seen in the laboratory, and believe certain 
ancient dogmas which he cannot hold with- 
out the sacrifice of his intellectual self- 
regard. It is extremely doubtful if Mr. Bryan 
will ever be invited to speak before this 
group again. But the damage is done!" 

In the interest of American education of 
the right sort, a pension should be given 
Bryan so as to keep him off the lecture plat- 
from which he haunts for the money and 
notoriety — the money first. 



"Is kissing dangerous?" asked the girl. 

"Well. I don't know that the question has 
ever been settled," answered the young man. 
"Why not take up a little scientific research 
along those lines?" 




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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 1921 



The Public Needs Enlightenment 



WHAT DOES the silence with regard 
to the approaching bond-election for 
the sale of Spring Valley properties 
to San Francisco for $37,000,000 portend? 
Surely it is worth considering, how the sale 
of $37,000,000 of bonds will affect our rising 
tax rate. It is also worthy of consideration 
that we face another outlay of from fifty 
to a hundred millions on our pet political 
project of bringing "pure mountain water 
from Hetch Hetchy." Will the purchase 
of Spring Valley relieve the taxpayers from 
the burden of Hetch Hetchy development, or 
what? Surely this should be the psychologi- 
cal moment for an explicit official statement 
of our municipal policy on the water prob- 
lems — not one, but the two. 

But nothing worthy of attention has been 
presented to the taxpayers since it was an- 
nounced that the State Railroad Commission 
had estimated the value of the Spring Val- 
ley's property at $38,000,000. 

That is exactly the point of public interest, 
on which an explicit statement is so much 
needed. Are the taxpayers of San Francisco 
to receive all that the Spring Valley com- 
pany possesses, or only a part of it? 

While we have great respect for the Rail- 
road Commissioners, we must remember that 
they are not necessarily infallible. At this 
moment there is a movement to have them 
investigated. Their appraisement of the 
Spring Valley's holdings at $38,000,000, 
does not compel the voters to buy the prop- 
erties at that figure. Perhaps the Spring 
Valley Company is not offering to the city 
all that it owns. We know that in the latest 
prior election, a very valuable part of the 
holdings was withheld. The people voted 
against that offer. They may reject the 
present offer if they do r)ot understand it. 
Why not give them full knowledge of the 
proposition ? It seems to be a most extra- 
ordinary affair that the preparations should 
be carried along, as if the voters had little 
or nothing to say in the transaction — that in 
fact everything was cut and dried. That 
can hardly be the case, but the voters can- 
not be blamed if they take alarm again. 

The water company is not popular. For 
some reasons the people have a prejudice 
against it. In years gone by there were 
various lawsuits and perhaps the taxpayers 
came to the conclusion that Spring Valley 
was worth the watching. That is all the 
more reason why the present offer should be 
fully explained to the public, if the Spring 
Valley people be sincere in their desire to 
sell. 

The greatest obstacle to the sale of Spring 



Strange Silence About the 

Spring Valley Bond 

Election 

By Harvey Brougham 

Valley to the city, is that the people remem- 
ber that it was rated far lower than the 
Railroad Commissioners ' estimate. Judge 
Farrington. a respected federal judge, after 
an exhaustive examination, set the value of 
Spring Valley properties at something about 
$21,000,000. How has the value of the 
properties become so much greater in the 
years that have elapsed? Is there an equiva- 
lent for such an increase, or is the larger 
total based on unearned increment — in fact, 
a speculative value? Somebody should arise 
and tell the public all about that point — 
somebody not connected with the munici- 
pality in an expert capacity, as the public, 
somehow, has received the impression that 
the municipality is over eager to have the 
city buy Spring Valley. Economy is not the 
best stunt of the municipal government of 
San Francisco. Its foresight and prudence 
are not proverbial. 

Taxpayers are very anxious, just now. 
about the expenditure of millions that will 
have to be figured into the tax rate, and the 
very moment that the Spring Valley Com- 
pany scoops $37,000,000 or $38,000,000 out 

of City Treasurer McDougald's strong box, 
that moment the tax rate of San Francisco 
will take another jump. 

* * * 

Of that fact taxpayers will be reminded 
for many weary years. Boards of supervisors 
and mayors may come and go but every 
bonded debt against the city must be paid. 
The interest will run with clocklike regu- 
larity. Therefore it behooves the taxpayers 
to understand every detail of the proposed 
sale before they ratify it with their votes. 
They should remember that the municipal 
political machine will vote for it, because it 
will make many easy places with fat salaries 
for politicians. Rest assured they have can- 
vassed all the probabilities. All the men now 
employed by the Spring Valley Company 
will become city help. Laborers will receive 
more pay for less work. So will it be all 
along the line. The hapless taxpayers will 
not have long to wait. Let them look at the 
Municipal Railroads and guess what will 
happen. 

* * * 

The valuation of $37,000,000 with an ad- 
ditional million for recent betterments, placed 
upon the Spring Valley properties by the 
Railroad Commissioners seems out of all 
reason. We do not question the honesty of 



the Commissioners, but we certainly do not 
accept their figures. The calculations seem 
absurd. How have the Commissioners ar- 
rived at such a sum ? Why is it that so many 
experts arrive at almost the identical amount 
of unsold water bonds that the city has on 
hand ? 

Water companies usually expend com- 
paratively little money on the development 
of their monopoly. Having corralled the 
water from heaven, they deliver it as cheaply 
as possible to their customers, and every 
day their water-pipes become less service- 
able. They should be well paid while ren- 
dering public service and in the event of con- 
demnation by a city should be recompensed 
for their actual outlay with legal interest. 

The bad rule in dealing with water com- 
panies, however, is to assume that they have 
speculative rights in the land they acquire. 
It was worth a dollar an acre, say, when the 
company grabbed it. In twenty years 
it should become worth fiifty times 
the original outlay, is the assumption. 
So, too, with the actual water, not a drop of 
which they have created, and which is re- 
garded as their inalienable right because they 
have built a dam to impound it. There 
should be a broad distinction of law between 
the speculators who monopolize water and 
companies that manufacture natural products 
into some useful material, or some essence 
like electricity, which can be done only by 
great expenditures. That is a manufacturing 
process, but the average water company 
manufactures little but schemes to cinch the 
rate payers once it gets its dam built and 
runs its water pipes. The actual work done 
by such a company can be fairly estimated. 
So can the worth of its land, and usually the 
land is of small value. 

The Spring Valley Company began its 
career as the owner of a well on the hills, 
now covered by apartment houses. The well 
was, properly speaking, a wet spot caused 
by seepage from a high bank of clay. In 
summer it was as hard to find as Ponce de 
Leon's mythical fountain of perpetual youth. 

Having obtained a franchise the Spring 
Valley Company purchased Lake Merced 
water rights from the late David Mahoney 
of San Francisco for $450,000 about 1888. 
It had formed a combine with the owners 
of some watersheds in San Mateo county, 
and ever since has been a factor in San 
Francisco politics. 

To a layman it would seem that Federal 
Judge Farrington's valuation of $21,000,000 
for the total of the Spring Valley Company's 
properties was decidedly liberal. 



February 5. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



The Building Slump 



LAWMAKERS who should be making 
sausages instead of State enactments 
are trying to solve the housing prob- 
lem by devising rent laws to squeeze the 
landlords. Isn't that the limit on crass idiocy? 
The chief cause of the scarcity of houses 
for rent is that prudent people are afraid to 
invest in house property. For years the law- 
makers catering to mob prejudices have been 
making enactments to injure property- 
owners. Now the chickens have come home 
to roost. The owners of building lots are 
on strike. They will not build. The out- 
siders with money in savings banks, and 
bonds will not take it out to buy buildings or 
erect them. Here and there large public 
buildings are being constructed. Theatres 
and office buildings and apartment houses 
are in course of construction, but the busi- 
ness of building homes has stopped. The 
stupidity and graft of politicians and the 
building trades have paralyzed it. 

By making more restrictive law, aimed as 
usual at the landlord's pocket, nobody at all 
will go into speculative building. It will 
require a vast amount of dollars to meet the 
housing demand in the next two years. 

Where is the money to come from? The 
Government cannot relieve the distress. It 
has no money except what it raises by taxes. 
Taxation is too high already. The higher 
the taxes climb, the more the rent must be 
advanced, or the landlords will find their 
property confiscated. 1 he fear of that is 
now keeping investors out of the realty mar- 
ket. 

Most of this confusion and slump in build- 
ing is due to the favoritism shown building 
trade unions, for years past. Formerly in 
San Francisco, a fairly good home could be 
built for $400 a room. Now it requires 
$1000 a room for an inferior building. 
Bungalows that are being put on the market 
today by speculative builders are too often 
mere shells. They will be little better than 
tumbledown shacks before the purchasers 
who buy them on credit can have their in- 
stallments paid. 

In every line of building the property- 
owners have been laid under tribute to the 
building trades by regulations intended to 
cause unnecessary outlay. The simplest bit 
of reconstruction makes a property owner 
liable to various extortions. Should he at- 
tempt to improve a bathroom, he may have 
to tear out all the plumbing to comply with 
the municipal regulations. Every kind of 
building work, or reconstruction must be 
done in the most expensive manner or the 
property owner will be ordered to tear il 
down and build anew. The Fire Department 



is charged with the duty of seeing that the 
various regulations relating to prevention of 
conflagrations are observed. The Board of 
Health is also empowered to make the prop- 
erty owner spend money. Every detail of a 
building enterprise which he undertakes is so 
regulated that he cannot escape expensive- 
ness. 

It is right that people should be forced to 
erect substantial and well-ventilated houses, 
but the object of all these laws is really to 
increase cost. Therefore the property owner 
who formerly could build at the rate of $400 
a room now finds it necessary to spend 
$1000. He does not build. He keeps his 
money in the savings bank, or buys attractive 
bonds, and preferably those that escape tax- 
ation. But somebody must pay the taxes, 
and the owner of real estate is least of all 
protected. That is why the average house 
owner is more inclined to sell than to buy. 

There is not much likelihood of improve- 
ment as long as every hobo, bootlegger and 
bandit can go to the polls and vote on ques- 
tions involving the addition of higher taxes. 
If we want a better government and more 
public economy we should exclude from all 
municipal elections, everybody but citizens 
that pay some taxes. Municipal government 
is a matter of dollars and cents. How ab- 
surd it would be to have every hobo, or ban- 
dit who wished, walk into an annual meeting 
of stockholders of a large department store 
and take part in the proceedings, as if he 
had equal rights with the actual stock- 
holders. 



"How did he make all his money?" 
"Nobody seems to know." 
"But he made it honestlyfi didn't he?" 
'I presume so. He doesn't give any of it 
to the church." 



CARLYLE'S NERVES 

The wife of Thomas Carlyle was a martyr 
to the eminent historian's nervousness. He 
built himself a refuge on his roof but the 
crowing of neighbor's chickens set him wild. 
Ht wrote of them to a sympathetic friend: "I 
foresee in general these chickens will require 
to be abolished, entirely silenced. . . I 
would cheerfully shoot them, and pay the 
price if discovered, but I have no gun. 
should be unsafe for hitting, and. indeed, 
seldom see the wretched animals. Failing 
everything. I see dimly the ultima ratio, and 
indeed, wish I had in my drawer what of 
mineral or vegetable extract would do the 
fatal deed." 

The historian's nerves recorded vibrations 
with the disastrous delicacy of a seismometer. 
It is said that once, when writing, he com- 
plained harshly of his wife's knitting needles 
which she was plying in the same room. 
When she dropped them, he growled a few- 
minutes later. " My dear. I can hear you 
breathe." 



They say that the price of paper is still 
way up so they'll probably go back to mak- 
ing shoes out of leather now. 



WANTED 

Oriental Rugs, Antique 
and Modern Furniture, 
Art Goods, Silver and 
Sheffield Plate, Paint- 
ings, Prints, Books, 
Etc., Etc. 

H. TAYLOR CURTIS CO. 

855 Mission Street 
Telephone Kearny 2332 



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Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where- regret. 

Let our expert automobile electricians 
inspect your starting, lighting and 
ignition systems regularly. It's the best 
insurance against a breakdown at an 
important moment. 

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MASTER AUTOMOBILE SLECTR1CIANS 
955 Po.t Street SAN FRANCISCO 



ANNUAL MEETING 
THE JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS 

The regular annual meeting of the 
stockholders of the Joshua Hendy Iron 
Works will be held at the office of the 
Corporation. No. 75 Fremont street. 
San Francisco. California, on Tuesday, 
the 8th day of February. 1921. at the 
hour of 10 o'clock A. M.. for the pur- 
pose of electing a Board of Directors 
to serve for the ensuing year, and the 
transaction of such other business as 
may come before the meeting. 

CHAS. C. GARDNER. 

Secretary. 

Office: 75 Fremont Street. 
San Francisco. Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5. 1921 



Reform The Courts 

By Thomas E. Flyr.n 



A SENTENCE of ten years imprison- 
ment for burglary is not sufficient, 
declares Police Commissioner En- 
right of New York. "A man that comes into 
your house at night armed with a weapon, 
and will kill you if you molest him, or if he 
thinks his escape is endangered, that man 
should not be given ten years in prison, but 
life." 

Commissioner Enright believes that prison 
creates no fear in the minds of desperate 
criminals, any more. It should be strange if 
imprisonment should terrify felons, for there 
has been a concerted effort to convert prisons 
into pleasant social clubs. Some of our news- 
papers have carried their sentimentality so 
far that convicts have been engaged as 
editors, not because of superior literary 
talent, but on account of the admirable dis- 
tinction conferred by their criminal records. 
In some State prisons the management has 
been virtually transferred to the convicts 
themselves. The central idea of the inno- 
vation is that conviction for felony is proof 
that society has done the convict a cruel 
wrong and the world owes him redress. On 
that assumption the proper course for prison 
wardens is to treat convicts as social equals, 
if not superiors, and having made their brief 
prison terms enjoyable, parole the victims of 
"man-made injustice" and return them to 
society to improve it. Unfortunately for the 
philanthropic theory, many of the liberated 
felons are no sooner set free than they com- 
mit worse offenses than ever. 

The proper course towards imprisoned 
felons would be to give them technical train- 
ing calculated to fit them for some honest 
occupation when they regain freedom. 

That is unfortunately not popular with 
labor leaders, who object to the competition 
of prison-made goods with those made by 
honest artisans. Convicts lack influence in 
elections and consequently cowardly and 
selfish politicians leave the unfortunate men 
to their hard fate. Convicts having wasted 
their time in prison, and assimilated more 
evil than good are turned loose to renew the 
hard struggle of life. Too often they become 
incorrigible human wolves. 

The treatment of criminals is a world-old 
problem, and still not solved. Evidently 
something is radically wrong, or the present 
wave of crime would not be yielding so many 
young and desperate offenders to the meshes 
of the law. Our mawkish sentimentality about 
"immortal souls to be saved" has carried us 
on the wrong course and we have a young 
generation, disrespectful of human rights and 
contemptuous of the officers of the justice. 
In former days these desperadoes, young or 



old, would rot in dungeons, or more likely 
swing in the wind outside jails, as ghastly 
warnings to evil-doers. Are we to resort to 
the barbarism of the Middle Ages to preserve 
civilization, and safeguard the homes and 
highways for honest citizens? 

The solution of the problem is easier than 
it appears if we but begin aright. We are 
constantly pottering with our prisons. We 
expect our prison wardens and directors to 
perform miracles, though many of them are 
plain people devoid of technical training and 
necessary experience. 

Why do we not look to our courts of jus- 
tice for reform? There is the correct start- 
ing point. Why do we tolerate the injection 
of cheap ward politics in the elections of the 
judiciary? Why do we degrade our judges 
by compelling them to solicit the votes of 
the multitude to obtain the judicial ermine 
or retain it? 

Why do we not appoint our judges for 
life, and pension them, thus elevating and 
encouraging an educated .professional class, 
who could give our turgid democratic con- 
glomeration acceptable standards? 

Until our State Courts become efficient 
and respected we shall not make satisfactory 
progress with the punishment of criminals. 
We shall have successive periods of judicial 
hysteria and apathy and the waves of crime 
will attain greater force. 



SQUEEZING THE TAXPAYERS 

In the report of the California Budget 
Board, composed of Controller John S. 
Chambers and three members of the State 
Board of Control, some emphasis (not 
enough) is laid on the increases of State ex- 
penses, voted by the people. One of the 
largest increases is the $12,500,000 allowed 
the common schools and high schools. The 
former have been given $10,900,000 and the 
high schools $2,500,000 by popular vote. 

Of course the people did not automatically 
arise and demand such an increase of sal- 
aries. The movement was cleverly stimu- 
lated by propaganda about the "poor hard- 
worked and underpaid teachers unable to 
live on their stipends." 

Teachers are not millionaires, of course, 
but most of them are in fair circumstances, 
and with their steady employment, short 
hours and long vacations, they are far Letter 
off than the average woman who is com- 
pelled to seek employment. The News Letter 
has no desire to minimize teachers' worth, 
or advocate starvation salaries, but the 
State cannot stand endless increases of ex- 
penditures, and every item of added cost 
should be examined. 



The net result of the raise of teachers' 
salaries is that $13,400,000 has been added 
to the tax rate of California. Not one citi- 
zen in a hundred paid any attention to the 
quiet propaganda for the increase of 
teachers' salaries. Everybody knew that the 
costs of living were increasing, but they did 
not stop to think that the costs are sure to 
go down, perhaps to lower figures than have 
been known in years. The voters also did 
not know that if the State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction would be made immensely 
popular by the increase of public school ex- 
penses and that in 1921 there would be a 
quiet but energetic canvass to make him a 
nominee for governor of California. Per- 
haps the superintendent is unaware of the 
movement, but practical politicians could 
enlighten him on the subject. 



MOTOR SHOW ATTRACTS 

The motor car exhibit which opened on 
Monday last in the Oakland Civic Audit- 
orium, and will close on next Sunday even- 
ing, has been a success far exceeding the 
anticipations of the management. Crowds 
have attended during the week, and the 
interest continues undiminished. It is con- 
sidered a fine augury for the motor business 
in the Spring. 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles lo the Gallon" 



Associated Oil Company 

Sharon Bldg. San Francisco 



Mr. & Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove 

SPECIALIZE IN 

Hair 

Face Treatments 

Scalp 

You have scientific care at 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

Kearny 2842 San Francisco. 

Berkeley Store 233 1 Telegraph 



February 5, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



NEW STYLE OF GHOST 

A new ghost story comes from England, by 
way of the London Times columns. A cor- 
respondent of that journal says: 

"The manifestations of the spirit took an 
original form. It paid its visit in the form of 
a human being lad only in shirt, trousers, 
and braces. Even in this costume it seems 
to have inspired a good deal of terror. 

"Some nights ago the farmer and his wife 
went to bed rather early. Their bed room is 
a large room on the first floor of the two- 
storyed house. The door of the room was 
left open. About 2:30 a. m. they were 
awakened by the visit of a figure clad only in 
shirt, trousers, and braces. This apparition 
stood in the doorway, extended its hand, and 
began to make what were described as dia- 
bolical faces.' The farmer and his wife 
were not, however, properly awakened until 
the intruder began to speak. All that it 
said were the three words: 'Mother, mother, 
mother!' It then vanished. The farmer's 
wife thought that it might have been one of 
her sons, and went to their rooms, only to 
find that they were both fast asleep. On 
her way back to her own room she encoun- 
tered the figure again. It was still clad in 
shirt, trousers, and braces and was crouch- 
ing in the corner of the landing. From that 
position it gibbered at her in what she de- 
scribed as 'a very frightening manner,' and 
she hastily returned to the bed room. This 
time she remembered to shut the door behind 
her. 

"I went to see if the eccentric spirit had 
made any further calls. The haunted house 
is at the end of a desolate lane. The farmer 
was at home. I asked him whether the spirit 
had been seen again. He said that it had 
not. I asked him whether he had any fears 
of its making another appearance. He said 
that he had not. I asked him why, and he 
answered that the ghost was not a ghost 
at all. 

"This, he said, was the explanation. The 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 
Office*— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



PROMPT SERVICE 

15 a feature of our daily luncheon. You can 
dine here in 30 minutes or less if you wish 

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OR SHORT ORDERS A LA CARTE 

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Sunday and Week Days 

DANCING 

6 TO 9 EVERY EVENING 
BERGEZ-FRANKS 

Old P00DLE-D0G Co. 

421 BUSH STREET. ABOVE KEARNY 
Phone Douglas 241 1 



house had been bought over his head. The 
buyer was anxious to get into it, but he had 
no intention of going out. He offered the 
buyer the use of one or two rooms tem- 
porarily, and this offer was accepted. The 
buyer moved in. Soon, however, the farmer 
said, he began to find his accommodation 
rather restricted. He asked for more rooms 
and was refused. The farmer supposes that 
the buyer resorted to strategy and the ghost 
was the stratagem. 

"The farmer now thinks that he has iden- 
tified the ghost. He states that it lives in 
another village several miles away, and was 
imported in order to carry out one spiritualis- 
tic performance." 



BRITISH DEBTS TO AMERICA 

Great Britain owes the United States, at 
the present rate of exchange, well over 
£1,000,000,000, most of which the Ameri- 
cans have the legal right to call in at any 
moment. The Treasury Department has told 
us that Lord Chalmers has left for America 
in order to arrange for the placing of these 
loans on a long-term basis. At present we 
are paying no interest, and, although Ameri- 
can sentiment will not tolerate an indefinite 
postponement of payment of either interest 
or capital, it does not seem probable that 
Lord Chalmers will have any great difficulty 
in coming to an arrangement which, regarded 
by itself, this country would feel to be 
reasonable. But in equity and common 
sense our indebtedness to America cannot be 
taken by itself. The debt was for the most 
part incurred by us on account of our allies 
in the war. We had been the lending nation 
until America came into the war, and when 
American financial help became available it 
was found more convenient for us to act as 
intermediaries. On our own account we 
need have borrowed nothing. It has often 
been suggested that America should cancel 
her loans to us on condition that we can- 
celled our loans to the allies. Such an agree- 
ment would greatly improve the financial 
situation in Europe, but it appears not to be 
feasible because America would be sacrific- 
ing a first class investment while we should 
only be sacrificing a highly speculative one. 
But. if allowance be made for whatever part 
of our debt to America has arisen merely as 
a matter of administrative convenience, that 
objection carries a good deal less weight. In 
any case it should not be insurmountable. 
Americans think it time that our debt to 
them was put on a business footing. So it 
may be: but it is far more urgent, in the 
interests of international stability, that the 
mutual indebtedness of all the allies should 
be regularized, if not wiped out altogether. 
We hope that Lord Chalmers has not gone 
to America for the comparatively simple 
matter of settling the terms on which we 
should repay the United States. — Manchester 
Guardian. 



POCKET BATTERY TESTER 

Do not wait until your car stops at some 
inconvenient spot, on account of battery 
trouble you never thought of, and you are 
subjected to serious inconvenience and per- 
haps financial loss. Invest at once in that 
most convenient and useful instrument, the 
Thompson Battery Tester. It will tell you 
quickly and without inconvenience all about 
the condition of your battery, if the cells are 
fully charged, discharged, under-charged, 
short circuited, over watered. 

If there is a dead cell the Thompson 
Battery Tester will immediately locate it for 
you. It will show you exactly the amount of 
energy stored in each cell. No other tester 
will perform that important service. Battery 
troubles cause 50 per cent of motor delays. 

Gustave P. Seebohm, 660 Market street, 
is Pacific Coast agent. 



FEAST WITHOUT GUESTS 

The boycott of an East Indian because he 
was elected to the Madras Legislative Coun- 
cil has led to an extraordinary scene and wild 
excitement. 

The newly elected member, Sayed 
Ebrahim, who represents the Mohammedan 
community, invited a large number of his 
co-religionists to feast in his house. Prepara- 
tions were made on a large scale for 500 
people, but not a single individual responded. 
A large crowd, mostly Mohammedans, gath- 
ered in front of and on roads leading !o 
Ebrahim's house, preventing anyone from 
entering. Not even the poor were allowed 
in, and taunts and abuses were freely hurled 
at the host, who remained indoors. 



Tel. Mai 



Ksliil.lishrd 1*6.'. 



San Francisco Plating Works 

-ilv.r. Nickel, Copper anil Bn<. Plating 
Work of ever? deaerjptlon plated 
Hirer Plated Copper Minim Pletei For saving fioid 

1349. 51 Mi.tion Street 
Betweei Ban i 



PYR0-V0ID 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 
- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with lull directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Saliffacttot* GuJrantttd or Monrr Refundrd 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

90S Market Street, at Powell 

San Francisco 

Dept. N. L Ejl.bli.hi-d 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 1921 



In The World of Commerce 



There is no longer any doubt but that we 
have reached a stage in business where just 
a few places remain to be ironed out and 
then we will enter the condition of pros- 
perity. The slump has been a very serious 
one. Business men have, in many instances, 
suffered most dangerous losses. That there 
have been no big bankruptcies is due to good 
management and the help extended by the 
banks. We find ourselves today rather badly 
shaken but conscious of the fact that we 
have gone through a terrible trial without 
the usually attendant panic. We have dis- 
covered that bad business conditions are 
largely a "state of mind" and that, under 
ordinary circumstances, that timid thing 
called capital lends itself too easily to fear. 
In the past, our bankers have fed that fear 
by withholding all help at the moment when 
heLp was needed the most. This may not be 
said to be true today, the banks have been 
wisely generaled and the result is a proof 
that the establishment of a national system 
of control, through the Federal Reserve bank 
was a most wise and a most timely thing. A 
financial slump is about 60 per cent state of 
mind and 40 per cent reality. We have 
learned to cope with the reality and to throw 
aside the state of mind by adopting a more 
optimistic attitude. If the affairs of the Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank can be kept permanently 
out of politics we may expect it to grow in 
power as a regulatory factor in national 
finance and there is apparently no reason to 
believe that politics will ever be able to show 
its ugly head in the management of the 
Bank. There is a lack of knowledge among 
the people as to the functioning of the Bank 
and its branches and it would not be a bad 
piece of publicity for the affiliated banks and 
branches to publish a concise statement, 
written for the layman, and printed in the 
public press. Newspapers and periodicals 
would be glad to have such a statement and 
indeed, such a publicity might be paid for, 
every statement made should be short and 
should be shorn of the usual discursiveness 
and involved technicality of the Government 
document. 

Money is easier and trade is brightening 
up. This tendency is shown in almost all 
lines of wholesale and retail business. 



SHIPPING. — The news this week consists 
of rumors of the withdrawal from the con- 
ference agreement of various steamship com- 
panies or the threat to so do. There is a 
specific statement appearing in the public 
press that the Dollar Steamship Company 
has so resigned. All of which has caused 
considerable excitement among exporters and 
importers. The withdrawals effect the inter- 



coastal business which is carried now on by 
eleven different companies. 

On the street the charge is made of undue 
pressure being brought by the United States 
Shipping Board officials on companies to 
whom has been allocated Shipping Board 
vessels. It is said that threats have come 
from Washington to these non-conference 
members that they must join the conference 
and hold up the conference rates or be pen- 
alized in having the ships now allocated to 
them taken away. Which is important only 
if it is true. 

More important than this is the persistent 
rumor that the step taken by the Dollar Com- 
pany is one that will bring rate cutting in 
its train almost immediately. If rate cutting 
is begun by the Dollar Company it is more 
than probable that other companies, affiliated 
by agency agreements with the Dollar Com- 
pany, will be drawn into the scrap. The 
non-conference lines are mostly new lines 
and they are after business and even the 
threat of having ships taken away will not 
prevent the cutting of rates. It is said that 
old established lines, with strong representa- 
tion at Washington are bringing the pressure 
to bear on the Shipping Board with a view 
of forcing the newer lines out of business or 
into the conference. If forced into the con- 
ference it is said that is almost equal to forc- 
ing them out of business as the traffic will 
then go to the older lines anyway. It is 
doubtful if the conference rates can be made 
effective through bludgeoning by the Ship- 
ping Board and it is doubted if these threats 
can ever be made other than threats and no 
aftermath. 

Export and import business shows signs at 
last of picking up and there is more optimism 
and real activity in those lines than there 
has been since last November. This activity 
will, of course, be reflected in shipping circles 
and it is now predicted that the exporters 
and importers have seen the bottom of their 
slough of despond. Those in business say 
that from now on there is to be a steady im- 
provement in overseas business. 

San Francisco has been honored in the 
past by having had men in responsible execu- 
tive positions in the Government employ in 
Washington. Franklin K. Lane is a notable 
case. Mr. Lane has made a great record 
in his work for the people and has risen as 
high as it was possible for a man to rise 
who was not born in the United States. 
Otherwise, he might have been a candidate 
for the presidency of the Republic. Mr. 
John Rosseter of the Pacific Mail gave proof 
of his great executive capacity as a member 
of the governing board of the Emergency 
fleet corporation. Now, that it seems the 



Wilson appointees to the Shipping Board are 
about to be automatically dropped from 
office, the finger of Fate points to John 
Rosseter as the successor to Admiral Benson. 
It is openly rumored on the street that Mr. 
Rosseter will be appointed by President-elect 
Harding, just as soon as the occasion arises 
for a successor to the Admiral. 

A better appointment could not be made. 
Mr. Rosseter knows his business thoroughly 
and if he can afford to give the time to his 
country and neglect his private interests, 
there is no reason why he should not make 
just as fine a record as Mr. Lane did in his 
labors for the people. 



INSURANCE. — Reputable insurance men 
are overjoyed at the apprehension and con- 
viction of Allan H. Shears, who was recently 
brought back to Seattle for trial from 
Yonkers, N. Y. Shears was sentenced for 
from one to fifteen years in the Federal 
prison at McNeil's Island. He appropriated 
funds of the company he represented to his 
own use and misrepresented the character of 
the risks written. He would insure a saw- 
mill and then report the same to his company 
as a dwelling or a household furniture risk 
and would appropriate the difference in 
premium. Mr. Charles H. Barsottie, assist- 
ant manager of the Philadelphia Under- 
writers, San Francisco, was a witness at the 
Seattle trial. 

On Friday of last week the first sales con- 
gress of the insurance fraternity of Cali- 
fornia was held at the Palace Hotel under 
the auspices of the Northern California Life 
Insurance Underwriters' Association. Orville 
Thorpe, the president of the National Under- 
writers' Association, gave a talk to those 
present on "State and Inheritance Tax." The 
National Association now has a membership 
of more than twenty thousand. 



MINING. — There are bits of encouraging 
information coming from the mining sections 
of Nevada and California. Throughout 
Northern California the outlook is more op- 
timistic and promising than it has been for 
some time. There have been actual develop- 
ments. From Sutter Creek the news has 
come of a strike in the Central Eureka. 
Mills, quite generally, are resuming opera- 
tions in this part of the State. From Eureka 
the news comes of the establishment of an 
electric smelter at Trinidad, on Trinidad bay. 
The Electric Metals Company of San Fran- 
cisco is doing the building. 



SOVIET GOLD REFUSED 

Russian gold is refused at United States 
mints and assay offices. Where it can be 
determined, the mints and assay offices are 
closed to it. On the other hand the gold of 
any friendly country or any other country 
with which the United States is not technic- 
ally at war, is being accepted if it carries 
that country's coinage or mint mark. 



February 5, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



Checks Replace Coin 



arrows of falsehood have fallen harmless 
from the great American ironmaster's armor 
of integrity. He has been the gainer instead 
of the loser in the utterly unjustifiable attack 
on his reputation. 



WE USED TO REGARD gold and 
silver as indispensable in our purses, 
not long ago in California. They 
have become obsolete with merchants and 
shoppers. Everybody who desires to be 
abreast of the time uses checks. The old- 
time collectors who went around on "steamer 
day" with their canvas sacks to collect ac- 
counts in gold coin have vanished. The mail 
carrier brings merchants their checks, repre- 
senting money balances. Gold is rarely 
visible. Its chief present use is for gifts to 
children or servants. Women of the pros- 
perous class have credits at their favorite 
shops, and seldom pay for their purchases. 
They tell the shop-people, "Charge it," and 
send their checks on receipt of their bills. 
The merchants like that system, and the cus- 
tomers prefer it. In many ways it is prefer- 
able to the old .plan of carrying around quan- 
tities of metallic cash at the risk of loss by 
carelessness, wrong changes, or pickpockets. 

Bank notes have become almost as un- 
popular as gold and silver, largely on 
account of their soiled appearance, which 
suggests to nervous people all kinds of risks. 

The advantages of the bank check system 
in the United States obviates the need of 
large transfers of real money. An enormous 
volume of business is transacted in San Fran- 
cisco without anything but bank checks fig- 
uring in the payments. Last year the New 
York Clearing House report showed that over 
two hundred and fifty billion dollars had been 
received in checks. The amount was a 
thousand times as large as the actual sum of 
gold in the country. 

* * * 

There are 154 other clearing houses in the 
United States. Even these do not take the 
full measure of the use of checks, for checks 
which are cashed directly in the banks at 
which they are payable are not included in 
clearing house figures. 

One great advantage of checks over 
money lies in the fact that a check which is 
stolen or lost may be recovered by the simple 
expedient of stopping payment at the bank. 

* * * 

In other days when gold and bank notes 
were the medium of exchange, the loss of 
money was apt to be final. If a man lost a 
hundred-dollar bill he comforted himself with 
what philosophy he possessed. He had no 
hope of retrieving what had disappeared. 
Or if he made a payment and then found 
that he had been deceived, he had no redress 
except through the tedious process of the 
courts. With checks the matter is simplified. 



A stop-payment order is sent to the bank and 
the loss is ordinarily soon found. 

The means used are interesting. Every 
morning the tellers are given a list of the 
stop-payment orders for the day. Each man 
and woman memorizes all the names and 
numbers. In addition to this the assistant 
teller whose function it is to catch these 
checks becomes active. "Red flags" are set 
up. Every bookkeeper, every teller, every 
clerk who may see the vagrant check is 
warned. Large sheets of paper with colored 
printing at the top are distributed. The 
young men and women who bang away on 
numerous machines may become ever so 
absorbed, but they find it difficult to pass the 
danger sign. A veritable semaphore system 
has been built up. It is as easy for a trained 
engineman to carry his train past a red flag 
as it is for a bank teller to cash a stop-pay- 
ment check. 

Checks ought to be cashed immediately. 
"Due diligence" is required and whenever an 
old check — bank people call it a stale check 
— is presented for payment the matter is in- 
vestigated. This is done quickly. Often cus- 
tomers have had their accounts examined 
before they know that any question had oc- 
curred. Then again the bank teller, like the 
politician, has a long memory. He must 
have a sound memory as a part of his equip- 
ment. 

A good teller can describe the peculiar 
characteristics of the signatures of the cus- 
tomers whose checks come through his win- 
dow. Some tellers know thousands of sig- 
natures in this way. That memory is another 
of the safeguards thrown around the check- 
ing system. 



LIBEL ON SCHWAB DENOUNCED 

Seldom has there been such unanimity as 
in the public denunciation of the attack on 
Charles M. Schwab's reputation, through the 
shipping affair. Schwab is too big a man. 
and too good an American to be made the 
target of political mud. It is the dread of 
such attacks as that on Mr. Schwab, that 
deters prominent and upright business men 
from taking part in politics. They fear to 
have their reputations besmirched, ^et if 
business men will shrink from that ordeal, 
who shall take the public places that demand 
a high order of talent and inquestioned in- 
tegrity. 

The unfounded attack on Mr. Schwab 
may be a public benefit in disguise. While 
it proves that no man in public life is safe 
from vilification it also proves that "thrice is 
he armed who hath his quarrel just." The 



THE GULLIBLE PUBLIC 

We have called attention several times to 
the danger of dealing with brokers not mem- 
bers of the Stock Exchange. The police 
have just been investigating a case of that 
kind. A money broker charged with sharp 
practice in selling options on German marks. 

Brokers are smart people. Their business 
requires them to be up-to-date. That is true 
of reputable brokers. The other kind of 
brokers are smarter — if .possible and have 
the advantage of a customer, in that they 
are not restrained by conscientious scruples, 
or fear of losing their reputations and mem- 
bership in the Exchange. Have nothing to 
do with them. Deal only with brokers who 
belong to the Exchange. 



President Jackson rode horseback in his 
presidential inaugural parade. All the other 
presidents used carriages in their correspond- 
ing trips from the capitol to the White House. 
President-elect Harding will smash tradition; 
his conveyance will be an automobile. This 
seems like a last echo of the relegation of 
the horse to the land of the dodo in city 
highway passenger traffic. 



We Specialize in 

Broken Hills 

and 

Con. Virginia 

And other 

Active Nevada 
Mining Issues 



LbUj on the 



San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Your business and inquiries solicited 



G. E. Arrowsmith & Co. 

Mambert S. F. Stock Exchange 

117 Russ Bldg. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 1921 




. — News comes from Paris of the arrival 
there of Count and Countess de Mailly- 
Challon, who were married a few weeks ago 
in New York. They will live in France, but 
will make frequent visits to this country, as 
the Count has business interests in New York 
and Texas and has spent much of his time, 
since the close of the war, in tho two places. 
He met the Countess in Paris while she was 
doing war work. She is a daughter of Mr. 
A. Hart McKee, for many years a resident of 
Paris and the former husband of Mrs. Cor- 
nelia Baxter Tevis, whose first husband was 
the late Mr. Hugh Tevis of this city. The 
Countess made her home with her mother, 
Mrs. Lidie Sutton McKee, in New York after 
she was divorced from Mr. McKee. 

— There was a large dinner dance at the 
Burlingame Country Club Saturday evening 
and many San Franciscans motored down 
for it. Those who received the guests were 
Mrs. Walter Martin, Mrs. Andrew Welch, 
Mrs. Eugene Murphy, Mrs. Bernard Ford, 
Mrs. Algernon Gibson and Mrs. William 
Duncan. 

One of the large parties was composed of 
Mr. and Mrs. Laurence McCreery, Mr. and 
Mrs. Raymond Welch, Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
munds Lyman, Mr. and Mrs. William Mayo 
Newhall, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Ruther- 
ford and a few others. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Poett had at their 
table Mr. and Mrs. J. H. P. Howard. Mr. and 
Mrs. G. H. S. Williamson, Miss Emily Tim- 
low, Miss Ruth Hobart. Mr. Edward L. Eyre, 
Jr., and Mr. J. J. Jackson. 

At another table were Mr. and Mrs. C. 
0. G. Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Roger Lapham, 
Mr. and Mrs. Evan Williams, Mr. and Mrs. 
Andrew Welch, Mrs. Butler Breeden and 
Mr. Edwin Eddy. 

Another group at dinner was composed of 
Mr. and Mrs. Piatt Kent, Mr. and Mrs. 
William Duncan, Mr. and Mrs. Algernon 
Gibson, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Carrigan, Jr., 
Miss Evelyn Barron, Mr. Harris Carrigan and 
Mr. George Howard, Jr. 

— Count Jean de Limur, who has been 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. William H. Crocker 
at Burlingame for several months, has come 
to town and will make his home at the 
Pacific Union Club. Count de Limur, who 
came from France last summer to visit his 
brother. Count Andre de Limur and Countess 
de Limur, has decided to remain in San 
Francisco and has taken a position in the 
Crocker bank. He is a younger brother of 
Count Andre, who married Miss Ethel 
Crocker. 



— Mr. Ogden Mills, his daughter. Lady 
Granard, the Earl of Granard, and their chil- 
dren, who arrived in California a fortnight 
ago are spending the time quietly at the Mills 
estate at Millbrae and are making no social 
engagement on account of the recent death 
of Mrs. Mills. Mr. Mills' sister, Mrs. White- 
law Reid, who is now in London visiting her 
daughter. Lady Ward, will return to this 
country in March and will come immediately 
to California and will join her relatives at 
Millbrae. 

— Mr. Francis Carolan gave a dinner 
Tuesday evening at a down-town restaurant 
for Mr. and Mrs. William C. Van Antwerp, 
the latter of whom was Miss Edith Chese- 
brough. Others there were Mr. and Mrs. 
Alexander Hamilton and Mrs. Joseph Sadoc 
Tobin. Mr. and Mrs. Van Antwerp spent 
the last week-end at Pebble Beach at the 
villa of Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Clark. 

— Among those who are now in Europe 
and will remain through the spring are Mrs. 
Frederick W. Beaver, Miss Margaret Madi- 
son, Miss Margaret Scheld, Mr. and Mrs. 
James Flood, Miss Mary Emma Flood, Miss 
Anne Dibblee, Miss Anita Dibblee, Mrs. Arm- 
strong Taylor, Mrs. Charles W. Clark. Mrs. 
Charles Raoul Duval, Miss Barbara Parrott, 
Mr. Stephen Parrott, Count and Countess de 
Limur, Mr. Joseph D. Redding. 

— The marriage of Miss Marian Leigh 
Mailliard and Dr. Walter Baldwin will lake 
place the first week in March and will be a 
society event. Since the announcement of 
her engagement Miss Mailliard has been the 
principal guest at several parties. Mrs. 
Effingham Sutton gave a tea for her Thurs- 
day. 

— Mrs. James A. Black entertained fifty- 
five of her friends at luncheon last Friday at 
the Woman's Athletic Club, and later the 
party attended the Symphony concert. Mrs. 
Black has issued cards to two other affairs 
to be given in February at the Athletic Club. 

— Hermann Oelrichs and Charles Nelson 
Shaw arrived from New York last Saturday. 
Soon after their arrival the visitors motored 
down to Del Monte for the week-end. return- 
ing to the Fairmont on Monday. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Goodfellow, who 
have been living at Burlingame this winter, 
will soon build a house at Pebble Beach. 
They bought property there last year and 
recently added another piece of land to it. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Augustine F. Cosgrove 
have planned their silver wedding celebration 
for Monday evening, February 7, with a sup- 



per dance to be given at the rooms of the 
Business and Professional Women's Club, 
at eight o'clock. A large number of friends 
have been asked to participate in the de- 
lightful affair, which signalizes the twenty- 
fifth anniversary of their propitious wedding 
in 1896. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John Rothschild gave an 
informal dinner Tuesday evening at their 
home in Burlingame and had as guests Mr. 
and Mrs. James Howell, Commander and 
Mrs. Wallace Bertholf, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. 
Wiel and Miss Frances Jolliffe. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Alvah Kaime are spend- 
ing a week at their Pebble Beach home. 
They gave a dinner at Del Monte Saturday 
evening and had as guests Mr. and Mrs. 
Daulton Mann, Miss Elizabeth Carrere, Miss 
Elena Folger, Captain J. Andrews and Mr. 
Eric Pedley. 

— Captain and Mrs. Henry B. Price gave 
a luncheon recently for Sir Karl and Lady 
Knudson. It took place at the commandant's 
quarters at Yerba Buena, and after luncheon 
Captain and Mrs. Price and their guests went 
to the dress parade which is held at the 
Navy station every Wednesday afternoon. 

— Mrs. Donald Y. Campbell gave a 
luncheon at the Town and Country Club for 
Miss Claire Knight, who is going to Europe. 

— Mr. and Mrs. M. Hall McAllister and 
their daughter. Miss Marion McAllister, left 
for the East last Friday, and will be away 
several weeks. They will return to San 
Francisco on the first trip of the Golden 
State, which will sail from Baltimore on 
February 15. 

— Mrs. Anson P. Hotaling, Jr., and Miss 
Edith Bull will leave New York on February 
26 for Europe. They will sail on the Aqui- 
lania and will travel abroad for several 
months. Mrs. Hotaling is now in New York 
with her son. Mr. George Hotaling, and Miss 
Bull will join her there in a fortnight. 

Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 











Confidence 

is the first essential to sucess- 
ful advertising or successful 
merchandising — t he c o n f i- 
dence of the public in the 
words you say and the goods 
you sell. As merchants of 
Women's Apparel, Willard's 
banks upon public confidence. 

Willard's 

Geary Street 

Between Grant and Stockton 






. 





February 5, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



— Mrs. Samuel Pond gave a luncheon 
Monday for Mrs. John Blake Murphy, who 
is here from Washington visiting her mother, 
Mrs. Norval L. Nokes. 

— Miss Maude Fay entertained at an in- 
formal dinner Monday evening preceding the 
concert of the San Francisco Chamber Music 
Society at the Hotel St. Francis. 

— Miss Fay entertained at tea Friday in 
honor of Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton, who has 
returned from Honolulu, and Miss Louise 
Boyd, who is being welcomed home after a 
trip abroad. 

— Mrs. William H. Chickering entertained 
at luncheon Monday at the Town and 
Country Club. 

— A "Hard Times" dinner party was the 
delightful way Dr. and Mrs. Harold Brunn 
entertained their friends last Thursday even- 
ing. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Paul Butte sailed on the 
steamer Maui for Honolulu on Wednesday, 
and will be absent for two months. 

— The Misses Doris and Marian Wirtner 
have sent out cards for a tea to be given 
February 5 at their home. 

- — Mrs. Gaillard Stoney gave a luncheon 
last week for Miss Mary Louise Phelan and 
also entertained Mrs. William Ashburner, 
Mrs. Marcus Koshland, Mrs. Edwin R. Di- 
mond, Mrs. William A. Magee, Mrs. Timothy 
Healy, Mrs. Frederick Pickering, and Mrs. 
C. Edward Holmes. 

- — Miss Jennie Blair returned from New 
York and Europe Sunday and is at the Clift 
hotel. She has been away since the first 
part of the summer and spent several months 
in Paris. She also visited London and re- 
turned to this country last month. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Winkler cele- 
brated the first anniversary of their wedding 
Sunday. Mrs. Winkler was Miss Dorothea 
Coon. Mr. and Mrs. Winkler are planning 
a trip to Europe in the summer and will visit 
his relatives at The Hague, Holland. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Richard McCreery sailed 
last Sunday from France for New York, and 
after a short stay there will come to Cali- 
fornia, where they will open their home in 
Burlingame. 

— Mrs. Edward A. Selfridge entertained 
at luncheon on Tuesday afternoon at the 
Town and Country Club, complimenting Mrs. 
Ulysses S. Grant III, who has come to Cali- 
fornia to make her home. 

— Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Rass arid their 
daughter, Mrs. Uda Waldrop, are visiting in 
Santa Barbara and during their stay in the 
south are guests at the Ambassador. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George T. Cameron and 
Mrs. Joseph Oliver Tobin have returned from 
a week-end at Pebble Beach, where they 
were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hill 
Vincent. 

— Mrs. Katherine Rose Hoyt will reign as 
queen of the Mardi Gras. After a lengthy 
campaign she won the coveted honor, having 



received 5 1 ,223 votes. The event is for the 
benefit of the Children's Hospital, and each 
vote represented a contribution to this 
worthy charity. The other votes were cast 
rs follows: Miss Maude Fay, 44,501 ; Mrs. 
Frances Langton, 37,728. 

— Dr. Harry Tevis, who has been the guest 
of his sister, Mrs. Frederick Sharon at her 
apartment in New York, has gone to Havana. 

— Mrs. Dixwell Hewitt and Mrs. Joseph 
Sadoc Tobin will leave the first of the week 
for a motor trip through the South. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John McGaw were hosts 
at an attractive dinner party on Friday even- 
ing in celebration of the twenty-first birth- 
day anniversary of their son, Baldwin Mc- 
Gaw. The affair was given in the fable room 
of the St. Francis hotel. 

— Miss Betty and Miss Doris Schmiedell 
gave an informal tea last Friday at their 
apartment in Post street. 



GOLF AT DEL MONTE 

The Elks of the State are turning their 
attention from lodge matters to the links 
these days in anticipation of the big tourna- 
ment which is scheduled at Del Monte on 
February 12 and 13, which takes in 
Lincoln's Birthday holiday. San Francisco 
lodge No. 3 is promoting the tournament. 
It is expected that the event will take on the 
aspect of a States championsihp for Elk 
golfers. J. J. Flatley, chairman of the com- 
mittee in charge of arrangements, is count- 
ing on having 150 players tee off. The sea- 
side course at Pebble Beach has been se- 
lected as the scene of the play. 

The Pebble Beach gold golf vase is at- 
tracting a number of entries of out-of-State 
golfers. The event will get under way on 
February 19 with a qualifying round of IS 
holes. A special 18-hole handicap medal 
competition will take place on the Del Monte 
course on Sunday. February 20. 

The list being circulated to help in the 
movement to raise funds to send professional 
golfers to England this season is meeting with 
encouragement at Del Monte. Peter Hay. 
who is doing the collecting, is confident of 
getting a goodly sum together. 

Miss Marian Hollins, the well known 
woman star of the East, has arrived at 
Pebble Beach. She has been playing with 
Mrs. Wm. C. Van Antwerp (Edith Chese- 
brough) and has been impressed with the 
improvements made on the new sea side 
course. Miss Hollins intends making an ex- 
tended stay at Pebble Beach and Del Monte 
and may be seen in some of the com- 
petitions. 



IMPORTANT CHANGE IN POLICY AT 
TECHAU TAVERN 

Always in the forefront of progressive 
movements, Mr. A. C. Morrisson. manager 
of the Teachau Tavern, announced this week 
an entirely new policy in the matter of prices 
which have just taken effect at this noted 
cafe and restaurant. All cover charges have 
been abolished, except on the Saturday, Sun- 
day and Holiday evenings, and the famous 
repast from this noted cuisine may now be 
enjoyed at the most reasonable rate of $1.75 
for a full course dinner. The regular 
luncheon, known to the business and shop- 
ping world as one of the most delectable of 
menus possible, is reduced from 95c to 85c. 
That this movement has found appreciation 
in the present trend to lower prices is demon- 
strated by the overwhelming increase in the 
already large patronage of the Techau 
Tavern. In the reduction the usual enter- 
tainment, cabaret, Revue Features and Danc- 
ing, together with the usual wonderful music 
and harmony makers, the Techau Tavern 
Dance Orchestra, is still prevailing, and with 
the Three White Kuhns offers an enviable 
program of amusement and entertainment. 



SMART PEOPLE APPRECIATE IT 

The Cafe Marquard cannot be described 
better than in the sentence: "Smart Place 
for Smart People." The best is never too 
good for the smart people and they get it at 
Cafe Marquard. There is some novelty in 
the musical and dancing entertainment every 
evening, but it is never a novelty to find the 
best cuisine and perfect service at this 
favorite place. 

The Dinner Extraordinaire for $2.50 is a 
feature which is much appreciated. The 
Continental Style Luncheon, 90 cents, served 
daily, offers a choice of twenty-six dishes, 
consisting of California's choicest delicacies. 
The Business Men's Luncheon, 75 cents, with 
prompt service is a gastronomic marvel — 
roast meat, entree, vegetables, salad, desert, 
coffee, etc. 

An orchestra, famous for its perfect dance 
tempo, plays during the dinner and evening 
under the direction of Bert E. Fiske. 



Most Pleasant Time of the Year at 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

To Enjoy Sports and Social Pleasures 
CARL S. STANLEY MANAGER 




Would Too Preserve Your Lustrous Eyes? 

Use Murine Eye Remedy 

No Dressing Table Complete Without 
aAI _ VK Murine As An Eye Tonic liquid 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



4/fotnobilQ 




m 



Remedying Ignition Trouble 

The best way to locate any electrical 
trouble is to begin at one end of the ignition 
system and make a series of tests in regular 
order. Begin first with the spark plugs under 
suspicion. 

Moisture on the exposed part of the porce- 
lain will often cause the engine to misfire, 
but this trouble on a wet day may be obvi- 
ated by greasing the porcelain with vaseline. 
Including defective porcelain, other frequent 
causes of spark .plug troubles may be traced 
to oil or particles of carbon collecting be- 
tween the points and sooting of the porce- 
lain; points out of adjustment or burned 
away. Ordinarily the spark plug gap should 
be adjusted to about the thickness of an old 
worn dime, depending upon the ignition sys- 
tem, carburetor adjustment and design of 
the engine. 

,When you have eliminated the spark plugs 
examine all wiring and terminal connections, 
making sure that all wires are tight and that 
the insulation isn't worn off at any place, 
thus causing short-circuits. Next, open the 
distributer case and see if there is any dirt 
or carbon dust. If the trouble is here it can 
be eliminated by wiping with a clean rag. 
But if it is yet undiscovered then perhaps 
the misfiring is caused by the contact points 
being pitted. These should be cleaned and 
adjusted very accurately according to in- 
structions of the manufacturer. Also make 
sure that the tappet spring has not weakened 
or been broken. Remember that this spring 
is under a constant strain and it will bear 
watching. 

Moisture or grease on the surface of the 
distributer housing will sometimes cause 
serious missing because the high tension cur- 
rent skips across the surface of this foreign 
matter instead of going through the regular 
channels. 

The ignition system is a delicate as- 
semblage, and it is up to you to keep your 
eye constantly upon it. Little attentions like 
these give you a smooth running engine and 
help you to eliminate expensive repairs. 

Remember that the setting of the spark 
plug points is an important factor usually 
overlooked by the amateur, with the result 
that other parts of the electrical system are 
blamed when they are not at fault. Do not 
guess at the space, but form the habit of 
using a gauge. 

Make a regular inspection of the wiring 



for loose connections and see that the insula- 
tion is not worn at any place. 

. How to Store Greases 

Greases, especially lime greases, cannot be 
stored for unlimited periods, because the 
quality of the grease will change. Lubricat- 
ing greases should be stored in warehouses 
or cellars, where there is a uniform, and not 
too high, temperature, maintained. 

If a barrel or a can of grease is opened 
and allowed to stand uncovered, the upper 
layer of grease will oxidize more easily than 
the grease which is covered. Oxidation will 
cause quick oil separation. 

The influence of high temperatures and 
heat in any form will cause the water par- 
ticles contained in the outer or upper layers 
of grease to evaporate to a certain extent 
which will cause the grease to change in 
structure and as a result separation of the 
oil from the soap stock will take place. 

For this reason the automobile dealer or 
garageman should be cautious in buying 
grease. If, for any reason, he finds it neces- 
sary to "stock up" it will be the better pait 
of wisdom to lay in a supply of fibrous or 
soda grease — it keeps better. 

The best plan, however, is to buy grease 
in small quantities — just enough for immedi- 
ate usage and to be careful to keep the con- 
tainer closed and as nearly as possible, air 
tight. 

Care of Gear-Set 

When cleaning the gear-set or the differ- 
ential drain off or dig out all of the grease 
or oil possible, then fill the part with kero- 
sene. Jack up the axle and run the engine 



February 5, 1921 

for about three minutes with the gears in 
high, in order to circulate the kerosene 
through the parts. Then stop the engine and 
fill the parts with new grease or oil as the 
case may be. A clutch, if in a separate 
housing from the engine, may be cleaned in 
the same way. 

The engine must be treated differently, 
however. It must not be run under its own 
power, or there is danger that the bearings 
will be destroyed. 

To clean the engine, drain off the old oil 
and in its place put about a gallon of kero- 
sene. Open the pet-cocks or remove the 
spark plugs and turn the engine over briskly 
with the hand crank. Or the self starter 
may be used. Half a minute of rapid turning 
should be sufficient. Then drain off the 
kerosene and put in some new cylinder oil. 
1 urn the engine over for about 15 seconds, 
briskly, then replace the spark plugs and it 
may be run under its own power. 

Khakied Automobiles 

They have found another use for the 
thousands of yards of khaki cloth, destined 
to make uniforms for American soldiers in 
France and sold to the French government 
after the armistice. The interior of Paris 
taxicabs are being upholstered with the cloth, 
which is warranted to last several years. 

Win Truck Mirror Fight 

A permanent injunction restraining the 
Kentucky State Tax Commission from en- 
forcing a law passed by the Kentncky legis- 
lature, providing that the owners of motor 
trucks be required to equip them with driv- 
sion, has been issued by Judge Stout, in the 
Franklin County (Ky.) circuit court. 

Leather Boots on Joints 

Among the little things on a car that stand 
a good chance of being neglected are the 
leather boots strapped over joints. Not 
only are the boots important as dust ex- 
cluders, but they serve, in some joints, at 
least, to catch small screws or pins that may 
get loose. Straps should be kept tight and 
defective boots replaced. 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



February 5, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



Good Advice 

Just one minute: If a thief took your 
car tonight could you give the chief of police 
the following information? 

Factory number of your car? 

Number of engine? 

Model number? 

Serial number on each tire? 
* * * 

Spraying Device 

The garage, or repair shop, having a 
source of compression air, may make use of 
the siphon principle for a variety of pur- 
poses. The most common examples of this 
principle are the ordinary atomizer and the 
garden spraying apparatus. 

Encloses Gears in Oil 
An inventor claims to have made a farm 
tractor 25 per cent more efficient than most 
machines of its kind by enclosing all gearing 
in oil. 

Remove Grease and Oil 

To take grease and oil spots off the body 
and fenders of a car without injuring the 
glossy finish, rub a little lemon oil over the 
spots and allow to stand over night. Then 
polish with a soft rag, preferably woolen or 
flannel. 

The Chronic Croaker 

Constant croaking is a disease, and if the 
man who talks from morning till night about 
"hard times" would devote the same amount 
of energy to hard work, he would effect a 
speedy cure. 

Cause of Motor Accidents 

The London Field says very sensibly: 
"The vast majority of motor accidents do 
not arise from incompetent driving, but from 
careless, unthinking driving and a tempera- 
mental incapacity to arrive at a rapid or 
mental decision with a physical power to 
translate it into action. Every motorist must 
cast away his past experience of what has 
and has not been safe in the way of driving. 

London Auto Accidents 

Automobile vehicles of all classes killed 
5 1 persons in London in December of last 
year, compared with 50 in December of 
1919. The London referred to is the metro- 
politan police district, which extends over a 
radius of 15 miles from Charing Cross, and 
covers an area of roughly 700 square miles. 



HARD ON SABBATH BREAKERS 

"What do you think of Queen Victoria?" 
asked an English traveler in the middle of 
last century, of an old lady near Edinburg. 

"She's gudc enough," was the answer, 
"but I believe even a Queen has no recht 
to do some things. She has no recht to go 
a-rowing on the lak of a Soonday. It is 
not a Chreestian thing to do." 



"But Christ believed," the Englishman re- 
plied, "in people being happy on Sunday, 
and went with the fishermen — " 

"I knaw all aboot that," angrily inter- 
rupted the woman. "I knaw how the good 
Lord went aboot on the Sammath, but let me 
tell you, I think the less e'en of Him for 
a-doin' it." — New York Times. 



SIX-MINUTE FERRY COMPANY 



Plans Made for New Boats, Slips and 
Buildings 

Public interest in the Six-Minute Ferry be- 
tween San Francisco and Oakland increases 
as the project becomes fully understood. At 
present the congestion of auto travel across 
the bay is a serious impediment and, owing 
to the steady increase in the number of 
motorists, is steadily growing worse. Any 
project, which promises to save motorists 
from the tedious and annoying delays that 
now retard suburban travel, cannot fail to 
be regarded as a public benefit. 

The Six-Minute Ferry Company has se- 
cured by lease from the city of Oakland, a 
landing place at the foot of Seventh street 
on the western waterfront, between the 
Berkeley route and the Southern Pacific 
company's passenger route to Oakland. On 
the San Francisco side Ferry Slip No. 9 
will be placed at the service of the Six- 
Minute Ferry. The full distance between 
slips is only three-and-a-half miles, as against 
the six-and-a-half-mile journey over the bay 
by the creek route. 

A limited amount of the common stock, 
which is the only kind issued by the Six- 
Minute Ferry Company, is being sold at the 
par value of $50. All stock in the company 
therefore stands on an equality. 

The projectors of this much-desired ferry. 



have had valuable experience in the estab- 
lishment of the ferry between Mare Island 
Navy Yard and Vallejo. That enterprise 
proved very successful. The stockholders 
received 8 per cent on the money invested 
and the value of the stock has doubled. Each 
stockholder received more than $2.50 for 
each dollar invested, when the Mare Island 
and Vallejo Ferry disposed of its business 
in 1919. The line is now operating between 
Mare Island and Vallejo and Vallejo and 
Crockett. 

Encouraged by their success in the opera- 
tions of the Vallejo ferry, the men who es- 
tablished it have put $400,000 in the new 
ferry from San Francisco to Oakland and 
express confidence that it will prove their 
most successful investment. 

The construction of the slip, wharf and 
buildings of the Six-Minute Ferry on the 
Oakland side is in charge of Howard Holmes, 
one of the best known engineers on the Pa- 
cific Coast. 

All engines, boilers, auxiliaries, piping, 
etc., have been purchased for the construc- 
tion of the three large steel fire-proof boats 
that will ply across the ferry. They have 
been designed by John Hopps, who has de- 
signed most of the successful ferry boats on 
San Francisco bay. The capacity of each 
boat will be 80 automobiles. 

The board of directors comprises several 
capitalists, practical men, who understand 
the construction of vessels, and particularly 
the type needed for the new auto ferry. 

It is a certainty that some enterprising 
oeople will seize the attractive opportunity 
to furnish adequate auto service across San 
Francisco bay, and the citizens who have 
already started seem to possess the right 
qualifications of capital, confidence, experi- 
ence and business ability. 



ASSETS OVER $1,000,000.00 

PATRONIZING AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS 
IS PRACTICAL PATRIOTISM 

RICHMOND INSURANCE CO. 



Organized 1836 



Pacific Department 

266 Bush St., S. F. 



Harold Junker 

Manager 



THE HOME 

IN»UN«NC( COMMIT 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Go. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 

TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 1921 




PLyEASURE/S WAND 



Stars Shine in Orpheum Sky 

It did seem that there could be nothing 
new under the sun in the way of dance steps. 
But along comes William Seabury and shows 
us that he is the Christopher Columbus of the 
"light fantastic." His methods are marvel- 
ous, and the six girls who assist in his act are 
given their share of the applause so gener- 
ously accorded by the delighted audience. 
Signor Friscoe is great fun ; his zylophone 
being only a slight accompaniment to his 
raillery and laughable "ragging." Beatrice 
Morgan and John Connory are clever actors 
and worthy of a better .play. Bobby Randall 
sings pleasingly. Gordon's circus is a good 
number. The DeWolf Girls are as popular 
as ever. 



Orpheum Novelties 

Claud and Fannie Usher will appear at 
the Orpheum next week in their admirable 
sketch, "The Bide-a-Wee Home." Vaude- 
ville can offer no better artists in their line, 
or more popular than the Ushers. 

Other features of the splendid bill at the 
Orpheum next week will be: 

"A Hungarian Rhapsody" by Murray 
Kissen with Harry Weston, Ben Reubens and 
Frank Corbett. 

"Step Lively" with Mildred Rogers will 
represent the last word in terpsichorean rapid 
transit. She will be assisted by a male quar- 
tette. 

Belle Montrose, the comedienne, in "Her 
Only Chance," a comedy skit, should be 
ultra-comical. 

With a reputation of having puzzled prac- 
tically the population of the entire world, 
Herbert Brooks, globe trotter, will amaze 
local audiences with his absolutely unex- 
plainable card feats. 

Musical comedy divertissements a la Foley 
and Leture will be presented in a singing and 
talking skit. 

Valentine and Bell in "The Furniture Re- 
movers" can surprise the most blase audi- 
ences. 

William Seabury's act will be the only 
hold-over. 



Alcazar's New Offering 

"Our Wives" to be given at the Alcazar 
next week, commencing at Sunday's matinee, 
is an exceptionally witty and brilliant comedy 
by Frank Mandel, a former San Franciscan, 
author of "The High Cost of Loving," "The 
Five Million" and other renowned successes 
that have placed him in the foremost rank 
of American dramatists. His latest achieve- 
ment is "Mary," a musical play recently pro- 
duced by George M. Cohan that has regis- 
tered among the best of this season's new 



Obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore 

attractions. "Our Wives" is a comedy of 
erratic life in New York's Bohemian world. 
The cast includes Dudley Ayres, Nina Guil- 
bert, Ben Erway, Rafael Brunetto, Walter 
Emerson. Elwyn Harvey, Emily Pinter and 
Gladys Emmons, and Charles Yule. 

"The Ouija Board" to have first San Fran- 
cisco staging on Sunday, February 13, is a 
vivid mystery melodrama of spiritualistic 
flavor, produced last season by A. H. Woods 
at the Bijou Theatre. New York, when its 
author. Crane Wilbur, personated the mediu- 
mistic charlatan. 




Next Popular Concert 

At next Sunday's "Popular" concert by 



the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra in 
the Curran Theatre, Arthur Argiewicz will 
be the soloist, playing Saint-Saens' Introduc- 
tion and Rondo Capriccioso for violin and 
orchestra. The principal orchestral num- 
bers announced are Berlioz' "Damnation of 
Faust" and the overture to Wagner's 
"Rienzi." The remaining items will be 
Massenet's "Phedre" overture, Liszt's second 
Hungarian Rhapsody, the "Dreams" of 
Wagner, Dvorak's ever-welcome Humor- 
esque and "The Bee" of Schubert. 

Next Friday and Sunday afternoons the 
regular pair of symphony concerts will be 
given with Kajetan Attl as soloist. He will 
play Saint-Saens' harp concerto in G major 




Claud and Fannie Usher are next veer's Orpheum headliners in their latest excerpt from real life. 
"Entitled "The Bide- A -Wee Home." 



February 5, 1921 

for the first time in San Francisco. An- 
other work to be given at these concerts for 
the first time here is Rimsky-Korsakow's 
overture, "The Russian Easter." The second 
half of the program will consist of Schu- 
mann's melodious first symphony, in B flat 
major. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



(7 



Brady Comedy at Alcazar 

History repeats itself. "Great Jove nods." 
The plays this season at the Alcazar have 
been so uniformly good — so excellently and 
uncommonly good that our surprise at strik- 
ing a poor one is great indeed. "Anna 
Ascends" was played by Alice Brady, pro- 
duced by her father, and had a successful 
run at The Playhouse in New York City. 
That may all be true, but we are here to say 
that it is not good enough for the Alcazar 
company, is below the standard of the Alca- 
zar theatre, and not what the Alcazar audi- 
ences expect when they go to their favorite 
playhouse. And to make matters worse, 
Elwyn Harvey wore a black wig that would 
frighten the bravest of us. How could you, 
Elwyn? You are so pretty and charming, 
and everything! Dudley Ayres slid through, 
rather apologetically. The rest of the cast 
were true to form. 



Maitland Presents London Drama 

The last half of the Maitland season 
opened brilliantly on Monday evening with a 
fine performance of Chambers' clever play, 
"Passersby." It is rather a "talky" play, but 
so well handled by the Maitland company 
that the audience was more than delighted. 
Arthur Maitland takes the part of Mr. Petei 
Waverton, the London bachelor who makes 
an interesting collection of human specimens 
at his Piccadilly apartment, where the entire 
play is staged. 



Western Author-Actor Play Fills Columbia 

A most interesting occasion in the theatri- 
cal world is the personal appearance this 
week of Frank Keenan at the Columbia 
theatre in his own play. "John Ferguson." 
The drama is strong and appealing, well 
acted by an excellent company of western 
artists. Mr. Keenan has a part that calls 
for his very best efforts. We seldom have 
anything so well worth mentioning. The 
appreciation of the large audience on the 
first night of this important engagement re- 
flects the renowned good taste of San Fran- 
cisco's theatre-lovers. 



A Delighted Audience 

It is a foregone conclusion that when 
Alfred Hertz prepares any program for the 
Symphony Orchestra it will be one which 
music lovers will receive with full appre- 
ciation. 

That was the case at the Curran Theatre 
last Sunday afternoon when a large audience 
assembled for the popular concert heard with 
delight the new works offered for the first 
time in San Francisco: Glinka's overture, 
'Russian and Ludmilla" and Dohnanyi's 
Suite for Orchestra, Opus 19. The remain- 
der of the program consisted of the well 
known "Scheherazade" of Rimsky-Korsa- 
kow, which is one of the finest examples of 
musical story telling in modern music. 



SHE CALLS TO CONDOLE 

By Frances Morrison in Judge 

"Oh, you poor, dear thing, how do you 
do? Here it's been a whole month since 
your father died, and I've been telling my 
husband every day that I just must go see 
you and this morning he said, 'For Heaven's 
sake go and be done with it ! ' Elmer is so 
emphatic. So I just got dressed right after 
lunch and here I am. 

"I have thought of you every single 
minute and would certainly have called be- 
fore, if I had not been so dreadfully busy, 
but we're having the house done over — 
kind of Colonial — it looks grand — I held out 
for ivory wood-work until I am a perfect 
wreck — Elmer is so stubborn. I have thought 
of you so much. Death is no stranger to 
me. I've buried lots of my family and some 
of Elmer's. Well, as I always say, 'Death is 
death and life is life.' There's no denying 
that. 

"I did so want to come to the funeral, 
but I was having a girl to clean by the hour 
— forty-five cents an hour — and I didn't 
dare leave her for fear she wouldn't do a 
thing. It's so hard to get them. They'd 
rather run elevators down town. I don't 
know what will become of the lower classes 
with so much artificial excitement. It can't 
be healthy to ride up and down all day long. 
1 went up in the Woolworth Building when I 
was in New York, and I thought it would 
kill me. I am so highstrung. 

"Well, death is a sad thing. There's no 
denying that. I know just exactly how you 
feel. Elmer says he never saw anything 
like the way I can put myself in other 
people's places. It's just a gift — my dis- 
oosition is. 



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"You're looking awfully run down. Why 
don't you go to some good face specialist? 
Maybe it's wearing black. It's not good on 
you. Now it is on me, but I'd never wear 
it, except for Elmer. I consider it depress- 
ing, and I never want to depress anyone. 

"You must keep your spirits up. I saw 
your husband on the street yesterday and he 
looked mighty bad to me — sort of a bad 
color. I'd be afraid of apoplexy, if I were 
you. It runs in his family, don't it? 

"Everybody is having their troubles. Mrs. 
Allen's daughter died on the operating table 
this morning — acute appendicitis. You never 
did have your appendix out, did you? It's 
kind of dangerous to fool with those kind of 
things. She was run-down from teaching 
Latin. 

"I must be going. I just dropped in to 
cheer you up a little. Good-bye, my dear, 
and do keep your spirits up. Just remember 
'Life is life and death is death.' You will 
find that very comforting." 



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18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 192! 



Profiteering in Music 



ALL OVER THE UNITED STATES, 
musicians are awaiting the results of 
the new move of the Musical Mutual 
Protective Union of New York, to make the 
three symphony orchestras in that city pay 
more for rehearsals. The three orchestras 
are, of course, running behind, for it is not 
expected in the United States that sym- 
phonies can be made a business success, 
under existing conditions. Generous capi- 
talists make up the deficits of money-losing 
symphonies. Here in San Francisco we have 
an instructive example of that kind of un- 
selfish philanthropy. In few cities is there 
such organized antipathy to the capitalistic 
class, yet our rich people, and people not 
rich, contribute out of their private purses 
for the support of the splendid symphony 
orchestra which is a boon to all lovers of 
music. Our San Francisco symphony or- 
ganization runs behind $100,000 a year, 
which is about the same, every American 
symphony must receive in donations from 
generous citizens or be eliminated. 

The musicians of a symphony orchestra 
cannot slight their rehearsals. They are 
well paid and it is understood that their 
artistry shall be preserved by necessary prac- 



tice. Only by faithful practice can an 
artist maintain his excellence. He might be 
able to play a cornet in a Salvation Army 
rally, but a fine musician cannot satisfy true 
lovers of music, if he merely rattles through 
a few rehearsals as if preparing for a Sunday 
picnic band. 

The pay of a symphony musician in 
America, be it remembered, is about twice 
that of a Marshal of France. This is not said 
to decry the liberal payment of symphony 
artists in America. Great artists — and many 
symphony players are such — cannot be paid 
too much. The point is that symphony 
players receive such liberal pay in America, 
that they could afford to attend at many re- 
hearsals. Many of the symphony artists 
were trained in Europe, and know which 
side of their bread is buttered. They also 
know that a good many American musicians 
are highly paid, though the same men in 
Europe would be lucky to earn a handfull 
of coppers a day as strolling players. It is 
just that class of musician who finds an 
opportunity in America to make trouble for 
their profession by devising unnecessary 
union rules calculated to destroy friendly re- 
lations with employers and do more harm 



than good to their calling. Such men belong 
to the class of "profiteers," found in all lines, 
eager to organize the last cent out of every- 
body with whom they have dealings. 

By such tactics the existence of the three 
symphony orchestras in New York is now 
threatened, and the trouble may extend to 
other symphony organizations in America, 
losing not less than $100,000 a year. 

In New York the rule has been that sym- 
phony players attend five rehearsals a week. 
Each rehearsal was of two and a half hours, 
making altogether twelve and a half hours — 
barely sufficient. Mr. Samuel Finkelstein 
(tailor shop sound) insists that no symphony 
orchestra shall rehearse more than four times 
a week, each rehearsal being limited to two 
hours; the total week's rehearsals being of 
eight hours. Naturally the public-spirited 
citizens who contribute out of their own 
pockets the heavy deficits of New York are 
up in arms. "Is this our reward?" they ask. 
"Are we to be given symphony concerts, not 
properly rehearsed?" 

"Oh, you can get all the rehearsals you 
want, by paying time and a half," retorts 
Mr. Finkelstein as president of the Musical 
Mutual Protective Association. 

Where the "mutual" part of the Associa- 
tion comes in, nobody but Finkelstein seems 
to know. To fair-minded people it looks like 
a regular jug-handle arrangement — all on 
one side — a profiteering job. 



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VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1921 



No. 7 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, 259 " Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second- 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year, $5.00. Foreign : One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

Lloyd George is talking of resigning. Does he want another 

raise of salary. He just got one — and a house for nothing. 



Thirty-eight million dollars to buy Spring Valley, that would 

be dear at half the money, and a hundred millions or so to finish the 
Hetch Hetchy scheme. What a headache for the San Francisco tax- 
payers. 



-How many billions of dollars would Europe cancel for the 



United States if we happened to be the bankrupt bunch? 



Methinks the Governor will conclude he started something 

when he took the tax fight before the dear people. 



Seattle threatens to hang a slayer of three persons — but they 

were policemen. That makes a lot of difference. 



Some people are kicking about the newspapers raising their 

prices. If those subscribers had to pay the paper bills they would 
kick a lot more. 



The Kaiser's yacht is for sale. Here is a chance for some 

San Francisco bootlegger to use his month's profits and snap up a 
bargain. 



Europe is stirring up that agitation for the cancellation of 

all war debts. So would America if she wasn't the one which 
loaned all the real money. 



Los Angeles has no sooner sent one woman to jail — for life 

(perhaps) — than another kills a man. Either legalize murder or 
hang a few slayers — if only for the novelty. 



The murder record for the United States starts off blythely in 

1921. When will we awake to the fact that we have an average of 
10,000 murders a year and not enough convictions to speak about? 

Poisoning and shooting among Japanese down in San Mateo 

county. A few hundred more cases in the annual murder record 
won't matter, especially in the smart residence suburb. 



The Taxpayers' Association of California is circulating its 

plan for reduction of State expenses, by $1,500,000. Isn't there a 
cipher missing, brothers? Ten-and-a-half millions should be the 
figures. 



'With all the City Hall push helping the sale of Spring Valley 

to the city for $38,000,000, Jim Rolph ought to put it over. Nobody 
votes now at bond elections only those who ought to be barred at 
the polls. 



The fate of Brindell, the chief extortioner of the building 

trust in New York, should set his imitators in San Francisco to 
thinking. This town will not always be a safe harbor for sharks of 
the Brindell type. 



-Only a few weeks more and the United States will come out 



of its political trance and resume business at the same old stand and 
with its old-time vigor. Nothing the matter with the country. Only 
a few people in the wrong places. 



What's the best way to advertise San Francisco? ask some 

newspapers. Why, just clean out the City Hall bunch and let it be 
known that any honest American citizen coming to the city has a 
fair chance to make a living. 



Don't let us forget for a minute that all this murdering and 

lawlessness now disgracing our country is caused by the low grade 
of our State Courts, and it will get lower instead of higher as long 
as we make judges' positions elective. 



Well known woman physician run down by street car on 

Market street and killed this week. Miracle that a dozen a day are 
not mangled, thanks to the sapient municipal government which 
cluttered up our fine main street like a railroad switching yard. 



If the newspaper publishers were wise they would cut down 

the size of their sheets one-half and cut out seven-tenths of the 
twaddle which the news services send by wire. The theory that a 
daily newspaper should also be a magazine, is erroneous — but the 
publishers continue to throw money away. 



While Ireland is torn by a religious - war, English churchmen 

are seriously discussing whether religion has not been killed by 
materialism in England. By the time the Irish factions of the North 
and South settle their quarrel, they may have the whole religious 
British field to themselves. 



Now the discovery of new evidence in the gangster cases and 

"frame-ups" and appeals to the Executive and all the other twists 
and turns of the law begin and will continue as long as the friends 
of the jailed gangsters have money for the lawyers. No doubt about 
it! The legal profession and the courts of California need reform 
more than all the other factors in public government. 



According to the California Anti-Saloon League bulletin. 

Police Captain Layne says "if hatchets and guns are needed to drive 
illicit liquor dealers out of business they will be used — freely if 
necessary. . . . Whether I have the authority or not. I shall 
raid every bootleg resort in the Central Police District and fight 
them until I drive them out of my district." The Anti-Saloon 
League must be trying to get the Captain in wrong with the Police 
Commission. Don't they outline policies for the police force, or have 
they gone out of business? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 1921 



DITcMAL 




The people, at this particular time, should 
Remember These Facts not fail to remember two very important 
things: In the first place, under our 
present system of taxation the ordinary citizen is paying not one 
cent toward the expenses of the State government — the utility cor- 
porations, banks, etc., bear it all. Second, the real danger to the 
taxpayer lies in such an extravagant appropriation and expenditure 
of State money that the corporations will finally be driven, by the 
constant increase in the rates of taxation, to either induce the 
Legislature to throw a part of the State taxation back upon the 
people, in the form of an ad valorem tax on private property ; or else 
force the people to indirectly bear a part of such increasing burden 
by multiplying their service charges to the public. 

There is something radically wrong in the administration of a 
State government that results in an increase in the expenses of such 
government by more than 492 per cent in ten years! 

It is not so much the salaries paid to minor State employes that 
makes the expenses of government so great, but rather the multi- 
plicity of high-priced officials, the extravagant management of State 
institutions, the constant duplication of overhead expenses, and the 
lavish disbursement of the people's money for unnecessary things. 

For instance, we have in this State seven normal schools in full 
blast, each having a complete organization of its own — grounds,, 
buildings, principals, teachers, employes, etc.; whereas, three such 
schools, increased in general capacity, would be ample — one in the 
north, one central, and one in the south. But instead of combining 
these schools, the present budget proposes to appropriate $500,000 
for another normal school in Los Angeles and $500,000 for a branch 
of the University of California — and this is only the initial expense. 
Their organization, equipment, and administration will demand 
millions more. 

Then we have six hospitals for the insane, scattered all over the 
State, for the support of which it is proposed to appropriate 
$7,512,790 for the next two years. And aside from this, the Pacific 
Colony for Women, and the Sonoma Home for the Feeble-Minded 
come in for another $1,842,700. Two hospitals for the insane, well 
situated and of proper dimensions, would be ample for a State twice 
the size of California. 

These are but two directions in which the funds derived from 
taxation are being scattered to the winds at the behest of "local 
pull" and interested politicians. There ought to be a stand made 
against this wanton waste of the public resources — this scatteration 
of the people's money; but it will not be made by those cheap pre- 
tenders who shout "economy" from the housetops, and then lend 
their support to the most profligate extravagance. 

At the present rate of taxation the State has an estimated revenue 
and available surplus of $66,939,200 with which to meet its expenses 
for the next two years, without raising the rates a cent. The recom- 
mendations of the budget board for that period are $81,387,692, or 
$28,714,436.55 more than the appropriations of two years ago — 
which would all but seem preposterous. Now, if these estimates 
were pared down an average of only 18 per cent the reduction would 
be ample to bring the expenses down to the State's present available 
revenues, and even then show an increase of appropriations amount- 
ing to $14,064,461.90 over those of two years ago — a larger sum 
than it took to pay the entire expenses of the State government for 
the two fiscal years covered by the appropriations of 1909-10. 



Therefore, the question should not be whether we are to raise the 
corporation taxes out of reason, or transfer the burden to the people 
in the form of an ad valorem tax upon their property; but whether 
the State administration will consent to bring the public expenditures 
down to fit the present revenues — whether the talk of economy 
echoes a sincere desire, or is merely political buncombe. 

In this controversy there should be no quarrel between those who 
resist the proposed increase in the corporation tax rates, and those 
who fear an ad valorem tax upon the property of the people; for in 
reality their fights are identical, and they should stand shoulder to 
shoulder in their demand for reasonable economy. 

Let the fight be on the budget estimates. 

On the next page can be found some highly instructive references 
to various items of public extravagance that cry out for the pruning 
hook. 



Our esteemed contemporary, The San 
Why Not the Senators? Francisco Bulletin, decries the idea of 

investigation of the State University by 
our California Senate. Why not? The Legislature is supposed to 
be the best choice of the commonwealth for lawmaking talent and 
experience. Does the Bulletin wish to intimate that our august 
Senators would shine with greater effulgence in an investigation of 
the dog-pound than a seat of learning? If so why not put the 
inquisitive Senators themselves under the magnifying glass? 



The gangster cases have been disposed of 

No Credit to Anybody in court and it is well. The crimes of the 

gangsters were a disgrace to civilization 

and the trial of the brutal defendants no credit to San Francisco 

justice. 

From first to last the cases were treated by the newspapers as if 
the courts were of secondary importance. In civilized communities, 
where respect of the laws and the courts are more noticeable than In 
our burg it is the rule to punish contempt of court by fines or impris- 
onment, and from first to last the newspapers were flagrantly 
contemptuous to the tribunal which tried the gangsters. 

It seems to be assumed by reporters that the press has a prior 
right to pass on the character of defendants or plaintiffs in all law- 
suits and color their reports to suit their conclusions. 



As the daily newspapers have been forced to raise their sub- 
scription rates, why not run smaller sheets? The public doesn't want 
blanket sheets, but the editors insist that they know better than the 
readers. 



The defeat of 2.75 per cent beer in Massachusetts this week 

does not appear to have been an impressive victory for the drys. 
The total vote of the 73 towns recorded was 20,424 — an average 
of less than 300 to the town. The wets lost by 2818 votes. 



It will be found that more people will complain of the pro- 
posed Sunday Law than now kick about prohibition, and that is 75 
per cent. Two hundred per cent will kick over the Sunday Blue 
Law, for each kicker will do a double stunt. 



The kidnaping industry seems to have a boom. A few life 

sentences would abate it considerably. That used to be a hanging 
matter — like burglary and highway robbery. Those old courts, long 
years ago, knew their business. 



It is to be expected that if the taxes are to be piled continu- 
ally on the corporations by politicians who wish to be popular, the 
corporations must retrench, if prevented from raising their rates. 
Looks as if the corporation baiters are overdue on a frosty spell, 
when thousands of honest fellows out of work begin to curse the 
mischief-making demagogues. 



February 12, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Questions for the State Budget Board 



WHY APPROPRIATE $17,500 for the 
support of the Governor's residence, 
for the succeeding two years — with 
no rent to pay? and why $18,400 for con- 
tingent expenses — for what Besides, how 
much of the $10,000 for "secret service" is 
actually expended for such purpose; and if 
there is an unexpended balance, what be- 
comes of it? 

Why an increase of more than $30,000 in 
the expenses of the Board of Control for the 
ensuing two years? In 1909-10 the Board 
of Examiners (which the Board of Control 
succeeded) had an appropriation of $44,760. 
The Board of Control now recommends for 
itself an appropriation of $286,080; being 
an increase since 1909-10 of $241,320. If 
necessary, let us abolish the Board of Con- 
trol, and re-establish the old Board of Ex- 
aminers, confining its duties to the auditing 
of bills against the State and passing upon 
their legality. A board that arrogates to 
itself the legislative functions of the com- 
monwealth, such as authorizing deficiencies 
to an unlimited amount, under a strained 
construction of a mischievous law, becomes 
at once a serious menace to the taxpayers of 
the State. 

Why an increase of $13,250, or 66 per 
cent, in the contingent expenses of the State 
Controller for the next two years? The 
expenses of this office have increased from 
$60,690, in 1909-10, to a proposed sum of 
$289,390 in the budget of 1921-23— an in- 
crease of $228,700, or 376 per cent. 

Why spend $43,525 for new machinery 
and $75,000 for a new building for the State 
Printing Office, which may be needed, but 
can wait another two years? 

Why an increase of $49,124 in the appro- 
priation for the capitol building and grounds ; 
when, perhaps, half of that sum would 
answer for the present? In 1909-10 the 
appropriations for the Capitol building and 
grounds amounted to $56,760, while the 
present budget recommends $236,720 — an 
increase of more than 317 per cent. 

Why an increase for office rentals in Los 
Angeles and Sacramento of almost exactly 
1 00 per cent ? 

Why an increase of $216,850 for the 
Railroad Commission? In 1909-10 the Rail- 
road Commission had an appropriation of 
$56,000. while the present budget proposes 
to give that commission the sum of $876,600 
— an increase of $820,600, or more than 
1 464 per cent. 

Why $11,820 for office rent and moving 
expenses for the Attorney General's office in 
San Francisco — $5820 more than was 
allowed two years ago? All wrong. The 
Attorney General should come back to his 



Does It Desire to Bankrupt 
California ? 

By Arthur C. Branscom 

office at the State capital, and save the entire 
amount. There is no more reason for an 
office for this official in San Francisco than 
there is for one in Los Angeles. The ex- 
penses of the Attorney General's office in 
1909-10 were placed at $79,160, while the 
allowance of the budget this year is $140,400 
— an increase of $61,240 since that politi- 
cal era. 

Why is the support of the Water Com- 
mission raised from $93,000 two years ago, 
to $201,700 in the present budget? If the 
Governor thinks this commission should be 
abolished, why this appropriation? 

And isn't the jump of more than 1 1 7 per 
cent from 1919 to 1 92 1 , in the demands of 
the Board of Health just a little tall? In 
1909-10 this board had an appropriation of 
$73,400, while the estimates for 1921-23 
propose to give it $1,203,625 — an increase 
in that period of $1,130,225, or considerably 
more than 1539 per cent. 

Then wouldn't it be a good thing to 
examine the proposed appropriations for 
"Constructive" purposes as a whole, under 
which head the Department of Engineers is 
given a boost of $1 18,640, of which over 
$100,000 is for "additional salaries?" Under 
this same head is added $6, 1 72,400 as "fixed 
charges." Why not scrutinize those fixtures? 

And when we come to the demands of the 
University of California and its various off- 
shoots, the situation, from the taxpayers' 
standpoint, becomes a tragedy. If this insti- 
tution is to be saved from itself, there will 
have to be some sort of a check placed on its 
greed for the people's money. One of the 
first things to do will be to shut down on the 
proposition of educating "the world and the 
rest of America" at the expense of the tax- 
payers of California. Every item of the 
budget pertaining to the State University and 
our other educational institutions should be 
critically examined; for, while everyone de- 
sires to see such institutions well maintained, 
the flagrant abuse of this friendly feeling is 
likely to lead to their rapid depopularization. 
In 1909-10 the University of California was 
given appropriations (general and special), 
including the support of the Davis farm, 
amounting to $531,314, while the present 
budget proposes to give that institution 
$5,592,887. besides the fixed charges 
amounting to $3,639,499.15. making a total 
of $9.232,386. 1 5. which represents an in- 
crease of $8,701,072.15 in the past eleven 
years — a percentage increase of more than 

1637. 



Why, again, this little increase of $35,000 
in the allowance for the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics for traveling and contingent ex- 
penses — from $55,000 two years ago, to 
$90,000 in the present estimates? And an 
increase of another $40,000 for the same 
bureau for the support of free employment 
bureau. 

Then comes an increase of $98,000 for 
the support of the Industrial Accident Com- 
mission. 

* * * 

Why an increase of $10,425 for the sup- 
port of the Legislative Counsel Bureau for 
the ensuing two years? The necessity for 
this bureau at all is at least doubtful, and the 
proposition to thus increase its appropria- 
tion seems more than doubtful. In truth, 
members of the Legislature and the heads 
of executive departments ought to be com- 
petent to prepare their own measures of 
legislation; and if they are in doubt as to 
whether such proposed laws are in "due 
form," it might be possible to procure infor- 
mation or assistance from the Attorney Gen- 
eral's office, which is well provided in the 
way of legal lore. The Legislative Counsel 
Bureau is a luxury. 

* * * 

Under the heading of "Education" the 
following proposed increases are also recom- 
mended in the budget — some necessary, and 
some worse than wasteful : Board of Educa- 
tion, $817,520; Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, $14,250; University of California, 
including fixed charges, $8,322,386.15; 
Chico Normal, $67,700; Fresno Normal, 
$98,400; Humboldt Normal, $45,080; San 
Diego Normal, $166,342; San Francisco 
Normal. $91,500; San Jose Normal, $364.- 
300; Santa Barbara Normal, $202,000; 
Polytechnic School $137,500; Southern 
Branch (U. C), $500,000 (new); Southern 
Branch. Normal. $500,000 (new) ; Deaf and 
Blind, $126,500; Hastings College, $3,000; 
State Library. $45,900; Historical Survey, 
$15,000 (new) ; making a total proposed in- 
crease for these educational institutions alone 
of $11,517,258.15. 

In the matter of the support of the Immi- 
gration and Housing Commission, an in- 
crease of $41,576 is recommended; and this 
is another commission which the powers that 
be declare to be unnecessary. 

And then the Industrial Welfare Commis- 
sion comes in for an increase of $60,985 — 
nearly doubled. It is another useless com- 
mission, and ought to be abolished. 

The Civil Service Commission is also given 
a raise of $25,180 — notwithstanding it is 
proposed to make it a one-man commission. 

In 1919 an appropriation of $458,100 
(Continued on Page 9) 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 1921 



Deadly Wood Alcohol 



NOT ALL the terrifying things one hears 
about bootleg "whiskey," made from 
wood alcohol, and "soft drinks," with 
a kick as dangerous as that of an army 
mule, are prohibition propaganda. 

No doubt the prohibition publicity agents 
make the most of fatal cases of drunkenness, 
from illicit drink, and attacks of blindness 
following the use of wood alcohol; but mak- 
ing a liberal allowance for possible prohibi- 
tion exaggeration, poisonous drinks are 
making considerable work for the emergency 
hospitals and undertakers. 

It is incredible that all the manufacturers 
of wood-alcohol booze are deliberate 
assassins, who think nothing of causing death 
or blindness, as long as large profits are 
made from their nefarious business. The 
more charitable view is that ignorance rather 
than criminal intent, cold, calculating and 
conscienceless, is responsible for so many 
poisonings. 

If all the concoctors of strong drinks, with 
wood alcohol for a basis believe that the 
deadly effects of the liquid have been exag- 
gerated, they are badly mistaken. Persons 
having no technical knowledge of the prop- 
erties of wood alcohol might imagine that its 
pathological effects would be analogous to 
those of grain alcohol — more intoxicating 
and protracted, but not necessarily fatal. 
Chemists know better than that. 

Years ago even chemists had doubts that 
wood alcohol possessed such poisonous prop- 
erties and were inclined to believe the re- 
ports of many fatal cases as grossly exag- 
gerated. Scientific experiments have, how- 
ever, furnished information about the liquid 
which leaves no room for speculation on its 
true place in the list of toxins. It is a poison 
which, used in beverages, must cause grave 
consequences. It is as impossible to prepare 
non-poisonous wood alcohol as non-poison- 
ous prussic acid. 

Individuals vary considerably in their sus- 
ceptibility to wood alcohol; some die or be- 
come blind from amounts which seem to do 
no harm to others. This is true, however, 
of all poisons. Death or blindness has re- 
sulted from two teaspoonfuls and from one 
to two tablespoon fuls of the poison. Sixty 
to seventy-five of those taking four ounces — 
that is, a quarter of a pint or half a glassful 
— have died or become permanently blind. 
That wood alcohol is properly placed in the 
list of deadly poisons is evident from the fact 
that the mortality from arsenic poisoning is 
only 50 to 75 per cent, and from bichloride 
of mercury even less. Of a group of 130 
men who drank a mixture of wood and grain 
alcohol, all but thirty-two died, or became 
blind. 



The popular ignorance of the deadliness 
of refined wood alcohol is due to its similarity 
to grain alcohol in taste and odor. No re- 
finement, however, can remove its poisonous 
properties, although it may become so much 
like grain alcohol, in outward appearance 
and smell, that an experienced chemist might 
have difficulty in distinguishing it. 

When taken into the system the action of 
wood alcohol upon the animal organism is 
fundamentally different from that of ordinary 
alcohol. This difference may be briefly 
summarized. When ordinary alcohol is taken 
into the body it is rapidly converted into 
water and carbonic acid gas, which are 
harmless substances, always present in the 
body, and any excess of which is promptly 
eliminated by the kidneys and lungs. Wood 
alcohol, on the other hand, instead of being 
changed into harmless substances which are 
easily eliminated, remains in the body as 
such for a considerable time and is then 
slowly converted into another poison — formic 
acid. These poisons, and perhaps a third 
formed from the wood alcohol — formalde- 
hyde — attack the brain and other organs and 
cause death or blindness. 

It is impossible for a person untrained in 
chemistry and without the necessary appara- 
tus to determine whether drink contains wood 
alcohol or the non-poisonous grain alcohol. 
At the present time, when the manufacture 
and sale of genuine alcohol beverages is 
illegal, and an immensely profitable secret 
traffic in "bootleg whiskey," is carried on it 
is most hazardous to drink the contraband 
stuff. Not even the purchase of what ap- 
pears to be genuine brands of well-known 
liquors in non-refillable bottles is a guarantee 
of safety. One of the tricks of bootleggers 
is to refill such bottles through a small hole 
drilled in the bottom, and closed up with 
hot liquid glass, which hardens and makes 
the imperfection very hard to detect. The 
purchaser of such spurious liquor may be 
paying a fancy price for deadly poison when 
he believes fortune has thrown a social prize 
in his way. 



THE NEW TREASON 

(From the Bahimore Sun.) 
The spear of our old friend William H. 
Anderson knows no brother in the battle 
against the rum devil, and the way he drove 
it into lukewarm Prohibition reformers at the 
Lyric Sunday should cause them to wake up 
and do their duty. We are amazed, dum- 
founded and flabbergasted by his assault on 
his own legionnaires. We had thought they 
were displaying immense activity, pursuing 
with tremendous zeal not only the profes- 
sional bootleggers but discharging whole dic- 



tionaries of vituperation at all citizens who 
do not voluntarily enroll themselves in the 
Lord's posse comitatus of righteousness. But 
it seems that they have been "laying down" 
on their job, that they lack both courage 
and sense, and that if they are to have part 
in the great hereafter they must "get out in 
the clear in behalf of law and order." If 
this be true, what will happen to (he crim- 
inal classes outside of the Anti-Saloon 
League when our local uplifters strike the 
real Andersonian gait? 

What is in store for those who dare to 
think that the Volstead act should be modi- 
fied was succinctly outlined by Representa- 
tive Yates of Illinois when he said: "If the 
persons who protest against enforcing Pro- 
hibition laws are ignorant they should be 
taught; if not ignorant they should be shot." 

This is splendid thought. It is in line 
with the mediaeval religious doctrine of con- 
version by thumbscrew and rack. Why not 
add such a provision to the Volstead law? 
We trust Congressman Yates will at once in- 
troduce such an amendment. The death 
penalty should be prescribed for all who dare 
to differ from the Prohibition view and who 
presume to exercise the obsolete privilege of 
free speech. 



BOLSHEVIST MONEY 

It has cost a correspondent of the Chicago 
Tribune 70.000 roubles per day for his food 
alone. His carriage averaged 15,000 roubles 
a day. In eight weeks he expended over 
2,000,000 roubles. "He must have made his 
newspaper bankrupt," some readers are 
likely lo exclaim. Not quite, for reduced to 
terms of American exchange 2,055,900 
roubles spent by the correspondent repre- 
sented only $82.23. 



"What does this friend of yours look like, 
Edna?" 

"He's just wonderful! Rather dark, with 
a twin six roadster and credit at all the 
restaurants." 



WANTED 

Oriental Rugs, Antique 
and Modern Furniture, 
Art Goods, Silver and 
Sheffield Plate, Paint- 
ings, Prints, Books, 
Etc., Etc. 

H. TAYLOR CURTIS CO. 

855 Mission Street 
Telephone Kearny 2332 



February 12, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Best Hated Official 



NONE of President Wilson's cabinet offi- 
cers is going out of office in a blaze 
of glory, but Postmaster General 
Albert S. Burleson seems to have won, with 
consummate ease the first .place for un- 
popularity. 

Whether that distinction is altogether of 
his own making or because of his official 
position, can be told, more accurately, after 
his party has retired from Government con- 
trol. It is easier to estimate the unworth of 
politicians after they have relinquished their 
little brief authority, than before. 

Burleson antagonized all his subordinates. 
His apologists explain that the Postmaster 
General became so unpopular in the post 
office by his efforts to keep down costs and 
put the business on a paying basis. How 
much of that is correct would be hard to de- 
cide. The post office clerks and carriers 
have a strong protective organization, with 
headquarters at Washington, and strong in- 
deed would be the Federal official who could 
defy the political strength of the union. 
Letter carriers are in touch with all classes 
of voters, could create unpopularity for any 
politicians whom they might wish to destroy. 

Aside from the hostility to Burleson for 
his alleged economies in the post office, the 
Postmaster General seems to have aroused 
prejudice. He is the type of politician in 
office who makes more foes than friends, by 
autocratic tendencies, and retires to privacy 
with the defiant pronouncement that he is 
"proud of the enemies he has made." 

That state of mind is no credit to a retir- 
ing official and furnishes an index of his 
character. The proud boast is usually the 
swan-song of statesmen who have been 
noticeably misfits in their public positions. 
Burleson has held the office of Postmaster 
General longer than any other man who be- 
longed to a President's cabinet. His posi- 
tion gave him great political influence in 
Washington and he used it in full in assist- 
ing the policies of President Wilson. Having 
made a million of dollars before he was 35 
years old, he became by reason of his money 
and aggressiveness an influential figure in 
Democratic politics. Now after twenty-two 
years of public life he goes back to Texas 
and about all that he can show in the way of 
an enduring record is that he beat the Wash- 
ington record for unpopularity and is proud 
of his achievement. But that will not bring 
him back to the center of the stage and the 
spot light of official patronage. Like all of 
President Wilson's discoveries he is as dead 
as the Dodo. 

The other day a correspondent of the 
New York Sun prepared the way for the 
Postmaster General's retirement by asking a 



series of impertinent questions, beginning 
with: 

"Mr. Burleson, do you appreciate the ex- 
tent of your unpopularity in the country? 
Do you realize that you are called more and 
harsher names by more people than any 
other man in the Cabinet and that you have 
many bitter enemies who rejoice that you are 
leaving?" 

The Sun correspondent's next question 
was equally insulting and improper, from 
the representative of an influential metropoli- 
tan newspaper: 

"Mr. Burleson, do you know that a great 
many people say the postal service under 
you is rotten?" 

That a fresh newspaper scribbler should 
have had the hardihood to beard a Cabinet 
officer of the United States in such unman- 
nerly fashion, would indicate that Mr. Burle- 
son is returning to wild and woolly Texas, 
none too soon for the dignity of his import- 
ant office. 



DIVISION OF SUPER-INCOMES 

In 1918 there were 67 people in the United 
States, each of whom received an income 
of from $1,000,000 to $5,000,000, their joint 
incomes amounting to a total of $144,500,- 
000! The soap-box orator and the parlor 
Bolshevik will revel in these figures. Capi- 
talism will receive a lively trouncing and de- 
nouncing for its iniquity. 

Let us figure and reflect a moment. If this 
super-income of 67 people in 1918 had been 
equally livided among the ICO.000,000 popu- 
lation of the United States, each person 
would have received $1.44 for his share. If 
it had been divided among the 40,000.000 
workers, whom the radicals are so fond of 
calling the proletariat or the propertyless. 
each worker would have received $3.60 for 
his share. What a millennial figure! Even 
a shoeless hobo would scarcely smack hi~ 
lips over this unearned increment to the 
vacuum of his vagabond purse. 

If the total income from rent, interest and 
dividends. $10,000,000,000 (capital' share), 
in 1916 had been divided among the entire 
population of the United States, each person 
would have received $100: if it had been 
divided among the 40.000.000 workers, each 
worker would have received $250. This is 
not the champagne figure which the thirsty 
proletariat vision in their dreams. Of course, 
with that $10,000,000X00 equally dis- 
tributed there would have been no fund for 
the Government to tax for its revenue, and 
there would have been no fund for the re- 
plenishment of capital in the industrial world. 
The economic energy of concentrated capi- 
tal would have been dissipated and the 40.- 



000,000 workers would have been without 
jobs the coming year. But why not? Let 
us eat and drink and be merry, for with 
tomorrow comes Bolshevism! Happily the 
worker — and there are numbers of workers 
who possess property and have savings at 
interest — has more sense than the spouting 
radical and the simpering, manicured parlor 
Bolshevik who so ardently sympathizes with 
the toiling masses in the comfortable environ- 
ment of the Persian-rugged drawing rooms 
of the simple-minded rich. 



SAFE BETTING 

(From ihe Marion (O.) Slar.) 
We bet the Canadians grinned when they 
read Mr. Wayne B. Wheeler's statement that 
the stock of whiskey will not last more than 
a year. 



A proud young father telegraphed the 
news of his happiness to his brother in these 
words : 

"A handsome boy has come to my house 
r.nd claims to be your nephew." 

The brother, however, failed to see the 
point, and wired back: "I have not got a 
nephew. The young man is an imposter and 
a fraud." 



An Ounce of Prevention is 
Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where -regret. 

Let our expert automobile electricians 
inspect your starting, lighting and 
ignition systems regularly. It's the best 
insurance against a breakdown at an 
important moment. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

MASTER AUTOMOBILE SLECTRICIANS 
955 Po.t Street SAN FRANCISCO 



Ramona Grill 

172 ELLIS STREET 

Breakfast . . 50 and 75 cents 

Served from 7 a. m. lo 2 p. m. 
Lunch .... 60 cents 

Dinner $1.00 

Served from 5 to 8 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays #1.25 



THE BEST THE MARKET AFFORDS 

Trrfta Cookmt D»/if *«/WJr SmtJ 
A PLACE OF REFINEMENT 

CAFE RAMONA 

172 ELLIS STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12. 1921 



Scientific Deluge 



HAVE SCIENTIFIC THOUGHT, evolu- 
tionary heresy, intellectual atheism, 
swept away the foundations of Chris- 
tianity in Europe? That is what English 
churchmen and church papers are asking. 
After us the Deluge, they cry apprehensively, 
as they look out of their windows at the 
workaday world and see the turbulent waters 
rising. 

For fifty years there has been open antag- 
onism of the Christian church in England to 
the Darwinian theory of evolution, which de- 
nies man the distinction of a special creation 
by the Almighty, and classifies him as a 
descendant of apes, whom a million years of 
evolution has improved. 

Prior to 1870 it was rank and inexcusable 
heresy to question the accuracy of the Bible 
story of the Creation — how God made the 
world in six days and formed a woman from 
one of Adam's ribs. In 1870 at an annual 
meeting of the Royal Society, the chief scien- 
tific body in Great Britain, Professor Tyndall. 
the president of the organization of savants 
created a great sensation by asserting that 
the Bible story of the Creation was in con- 
flict with scientific research, and could no 
longer be accepted by scholars. He added 
that Science would compel dogma to aban- 
don the field of biology. The secrets and 
mystery of life could not be explained by 
mystical imagining but by fearless scientific 
research. 

Nowadays such a statement would not ex- 
cite the least surprise, but fifty years ago it 
stirred the religious world. To understand 
the feelings of the aroused churchmen, it 
must be remembered that for many centuries 
clerical dogma was accepted as the voice 
from on high. To question its accuracy 
was a risky business, for the Church dealt 
energetically with heretics. Such persons 
were likely to find the rack or the flames 
awaiting them. 

No church could torture or burn Professor 
Tyndall in 1870, but the words of anger and 
contempt poured on him from British pulpits 
were withering. 

The attitude of orthodox churchmen to- 
wards the theory of evolution, remained un- 
compromising for years. Recently, however, 
educated churchmen familiar with the ad- 
vance in scientific research, have had great 
influence in modifying orthodox belief with 
regard to the age of the earth and the true 
origin of man. The prediction of Professor 
Tyndall in 1870 has been more than fulfilled. 
Not only has dogma abandoned the field of 
science in the explanation of the creation of 
the world and the origin of human life, but 
distinguished churchmen are teaching the 



doctrine of evolution which they formerly 
condemned as heresy. 

Canon E. W. Barnes of Westminster 
Abbey, London, is delivering in the Abbey, a 
series of sermons on "Evolution and Church 
Belief," in which he argues that Christian 
doctrine is not incompatible with acceptance 
of the Darwinian theory of evolution — that 
the various forms of life on this earth were 
not created separately but sprang from 
primitive forms and have been modified in 
thousands of generations. 

Canon Barnes admits that "a large ma- 
jority of thinking people have felt forced to 
accept the theory of evolution; and many 
are anxious to know how a Christian teacher 
who likewise accepts the theory, unites it to 
his faith in Christ." 

Those searchers after truth, the Canon 
said in a recent sermon, believe erroneously 
that Christianity is incredible once it is ad- 
mitted that the Bible story of the Creation, is 
admitted to be incorrect. 

Unfortunately the Canon's complete ser- 
mon does not appear in the English church 
newspapers that have given it publicity. It 
is, therefore, impossible to state how he 
avoided the dilemma in which he was placed, 
by his questioning congregation, who felt 
shaken in their Christian dogmas. 

Those doubting Thomases, having con- 
cluded that the Old Testament was not in- 
fallible, were inclined to regard the veracity 
of the New Testament with less than implicit 
confidence. From that condition to atheism, 
or at least something different from orthodox 
Christianity, might not be a long step. And 
in fact such atheism is one of the great 
dangers of the Christian world, today, if we 
can accept the statements of Professor A. E. 
Taylor, which has appeared in the English 
Church Times, and been discussed, at the 
recent Anglo-Catholic Congress. 

Professor Taylor is much more outspoken 
in his utterances than Canon Barnes. The 
main battle which now confronts the Chris- 
tian world, he declares, is an atheistic phil- 
osophy, "which is gaining the ear of our 
thinking young men." 

"These latter." declares Professor Taylor, 
"are being told by persuasive voices, that 
there is not any real distinction between good 
and bad, only the irrational prejudices of 
individuals; that the law of Christ has drawn 
it in the wrong way; that the future must 
set itself to transmute all values. Humility, 
weakness, gentleness, all that Christianity de- 
clares to be the fruits of the Spirit, are 
symptoms of weakness and disease; pride, 
self-will, preferring one's self in honor before 
others, these are the tempers of the strong 
men, these are the real virtues." 



Commenting on these conclusions of Pro- 
fessor Taylor, the Church Times declares that 
"morality is fast becoming divorced from 
Christian ideals; the Sermon on the Mount 
is, in the minds of many, but the pronounce- 
ment of a visionary who believed the end of 
the world was near. Christian ethics are im- 
possible for the business man, so for six days 
in the week they must be forgotten; sex 
questions must be revised in the light of the 
new psychology; Christ was mistaken in 
placing such a high value on personal 
chastity — and so on. 

"The past generation of agnostic phil- 
osophers (Tyndall, Huxley and their con- 
temporaries) did indeed assail our traditional 
beliefs about Scripture history and Christian 
miracles, but in the main they were in full 
sympathy with the Christian moral ideal. 

"But now it is different. The intellectual 
outlook has changed. There is in the world 
today what there perhaps never was before 
— an atheistic philosophy which is not 
negligible." 

Only by active organization of the Chris- 
tian churches and special preparation of the 
ministry to meet this menace of intellectual 
heresy can it be overcome, declares the 
Church Times. 



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February 12, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



(Continued from Page 5) 
was made for the support of the National 
Guard: now the recommendation is made for 
$753,430— an increase of $295,330. 

The "Development" section of the budget 
including the State Agricultural Society, the 
Land Settlement Board, the Department of 
Agriculture, the Market Commissioner, the 
Sixth District Agricultural Association, the 
Mining Bureau, and the Napa State Farm, 
shows a total proposed increase in the 
present budget of $1,079,598.27. 

The appropriations recommended for the 
"Conservation" section shows only an in- 
crease of $80,972. 

The estimates for the Veterans' Home, 
under the head "Benevolent," show an in- 
crease of $200,420; the Woman's Relief 
Corps Home, $45,800; the Home for Adult 
Blind, $104,650; the Orphans' Aid, a de- 
crease of $2,093,688 — but to this last group 
is added $2,838,000 as "fixed charges." 

Under the head of "Curative," the Lunacy 
Commission is allowed an increase of $21,- 
350; Agnews Hospital, $313,316; Mendo- 
cino Hospital, $330,986; Napa Hospital. 
$428,340; Norwalk Hospital, $563,950; 
Pacific Colony (new), $510,700; Sonoma 
Home, $580,584; Southern California Hos- 
pital, $228,350; and Stockton Hospital. 
$550,300. 

Under the "Corrective" heading the fol- 
lowing increases are recommended: School 
for Girls, $125,900; Preston School. $328.- 
900; and Whittier School. $279,000. 

The recommendations for the support of 
our "Penal" institutions show the following 
increases over the allowances of 1919: San 
Quentin, $156,320; Folsom Prison. $189,- 
250; Delinquent Women. $109,000 (new); 
Prison Directors, $36,000; Transportation, 
$16,000; and Criminal Identification. $4800. 

Under the "Miscellaneous" heading the 
increase is $250,287.58— of'which $250,000 
is for an increase of the Emergency Fund 
from $250,000 to $500,000. 

The total "fixed charges." as stated in the 
budget, amount to $44,909,749; and De- 
ficiencies amounting to $788,903.78 are also 
recommended for allowance. 

The grand total of general and special ap- 
propriations, made by the Legislature of 
1909-10 amounted to $13,751,153.72; while 
the grand total of general and special appro- 
priations recommended in the present budget 
amount to the sum of $81.387.692.51 — an 
increase since the days of Governor Gillett 
of over 492 per cent in the expenses of the 
State government. 

By this budget it is proposed to increase 
the purely "Administrative" expenses of the 
State government alone by more than $480.- 
000 — nearly half a million dollars. 

The increase in the population of Cali- 
fornia during the past ten years has been 
1 .048.886. or a little more than 44 per cent. 
The increase in the expenses of our State 



government for the past ten years has been 
$67,636,538.79, or 492 per cent. 

And as a side item, won't somebody find 
out how many automobiles have been pur- 
chased at the public expense for the various 
State officials and employes; some of whom 
are loudly boasting of their love for economy? 
As a matter of fact the State of California 
has purchased twice as many automobiles 
for the convenience and .pleasure of her 
official family, great and small, as has any 
other State in the American Union — some of 
said officials acquiring two and three ma- 
chines each for their personal use! And 
yet, it may be noticed, their "traveling ex- 
penses" increase as often as the biennial 
session of the Legislature comes around. 

The present unsettled condition of the 
United States, if not the whole world, should 
suggest economy in State government, but 
at Sacramento the policy seems to be 
culpable extravagance, rapidly bordering on 
financial insanity. Will the people tolerate 
that kind of government till it bankrupts our 
State? 



ATTACKS ON INDIAN VICEROY 

According to the Manchester Guardian the 
attacks which are being made on the appoint- 
ment of Lord Reading to be Viceroy of 
India will injure neither him nor his pros- 
pects of success in India. They are only 
mischievous because they fan, as they are 
intended to fan, the latent prejudice against 



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the Jew in general and excite the envy which 
the conspicuous success of a Jew, however 
strictly merited, not infrequently rouses. 
This well-recognized social fact, which has 
a feeble life in our own as compared with 
most other countries in Europe, accounts for 
the timidity with which a Jewish journal re- 
grets that Lord Reading should have ac- 
cepted the post. 



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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 1921 



In The World of Commerce 



The progress toward more stable and 
better times is still going on but the move- 
ment is characterized by a slowness which 
may be a very good thing in the end. Sud- 
den changes in economic conditions in 
Europe are still far from satisfactory and 
those in the Orient are disquieting. Of 
course, until such time as Europe and Asia 
find themselves nearer a more normal condi- 
tion, there is bound to be an anxiety dis- 
played in the financial world. This anxiety 
will not alone effect the great money heart 
of the country in New York but will, to a 
lesser extent, affect money conditions in all 
parts of the country. 

The establishment of the hundred million 
corporation, which it was expected would be 
functioning about the first of January, has 
not been so easy a matter as was supposed 
by those who stood sponsor for this gigantic 
enterprise. A false impression has found 
currency among exporters and importers in 
San Francisco as well as elsewhere, that this 
corporation was to be formed and would 
almost immediately lend assistance to the 
exporter or importer in order to supply 
needed capital for extension of business or 
for the purpose of meeting foreign competi- 
tion. The world is already feeling the effect 
of "dumping" by Germany. This is notably 
felt in the South American markets. Our 
exporters cannot compete with a nation pay- 
ing its help a meager wage with a depreci- 
ated currency and live. Metal products and 
chemicals, it is reported, are being sold in 
Argentine, Chile and Brazil at 60 per cent 
below American quotations. As a partial 
palliative against such aggression by the 
Germans the Council of the League has pro- 
posed in the reparations articles to place an 
export embargo on German products of 12 
per cent. Maudlin and ill-advised people 
have raised objections to this step without 
taking into consideration the fact that, in 
peace times as in war, Germany is proving 
herself an enemy to the rest of mankind, 
especially to the rest of mankind, employed 
in our factories, represented as labor. For 
the present the hundred million dollar cor- 
poration is little else than a good "front page 
story" for the newspapers and our export 
and import houses may as well forget the 
idea of obtaining any assistance from that 
quarter until the corporation has carried out 
its first duty — that of protecting the banks 
of the country. Mean while, the exporter 
and importer is invited to give a much closer 
study to the question of trade acceptances, 
the only apparent relief at hand. 



cisco is singularly free of this particular kind 
of abuse in insurance and it is an evidence 
of the better average honesty of the business 
man of the Golden Gate city as well as an 
evidence of a continuing prosperity in busi- 
ness. It is only when the times are hard 
that moral hazard comes very actively into 
play. 

With the use of oil fuel on ships there is 
an additional menace to our water front and 
this calls to mind the necessity of doing 
everything that we can to retain the two 
fire boats of the city in commission. New 
York has just asked for Federal assistance 
in minimizing the chances of fire through the 
cleaning of oil tanks and throwing of the 
refuse on the waters of New York harbor. 
The fire hazard is increased by the fuel stick- 
ing to the docks. New York makes a com- 
plaint that practically 20 per cent of the 
vessels coming into the harbor are fuel burn- 
ing and that they continually break the law 
by cleaning their tanks alongside the piers. 
An additional complaint is made that much 
oil finds its way into the water in the process 
of filling the tanks. This is true of San 
Francisco bay and, although there is a law 
against the practice, those who travel on the 
bay will often see great areas of water cov- 
ered by the iridescent evidence of oil waste 
on the waters. 

Williard Done has charge of watching the 
legislative body at Sacramento, as far as the 
insurance interests are concerned, and he is 
spending much time at the capital just now. 
Mr. Done is the executive secretary of the 
California Association of Insurance Agents. 
Arthur M. Brown, of Edward Brown & 
Sons, has returned recently from a visit to 
the "cotton belt" of Arizona and New 
Mexico. He reports an overproduction of 
the staple and more or less quiet conditions 
as prevailing. He says that owners have 
adopted every possible precaution against 
loss by fire. 

There is a movement on foot in some of 
the eastern States to have laws passed which 
will compel property owners, whose prop- 
erty is destroyed by fire, to indemnify owners 
of adjacent property if this is damaged by 
reason of the fire. It is proposed, too, that 
the State assess property owners whose 
property has been destroyed by reason of 
carelessness. 

Marsh and McLennan have made a record 
in 1920 of writing over one million dollars 
in premiums with a loss ratio of 3 1 per cent. 
They are open to congratulations. 



some time before the various companies may 
put out the sign "business as usual." Passen- 
ger business is improving much more rapidly 
than freight. Those exporters and importers 
who are doing business with Chile and Peru 
are beginning to feel the competition of New 
York and New Orleans and there is a grow- 
ing demand for faster steamers and a better 
service. Passengers have been complaining 
and those sending freight are likewise clam- 
oring for a shortening of the time between 
San Francisco and South American ports. 



INSURANCE.— Moral hazard is again to 
the front all over the country. San Fran- 



SHIPPING. — Business in shipping circles 
is very slowly continuing its improvement. 
The upward march is very slow and it will be 



MINING. — This is the season of the year 
when the big mining districts are usually 
quiet. There is, however, an undercurrent 
of great activity. The northern California 
mines are all of them showing a tendency to 
development and, apparently, the owners and 
operators are preparing for a big season of 
work. The slogan is "expansion and devel- 
opment." For some time, the doubting ones 
have been spreading the propaganda that the 
"poor man's" mining in California and Ne- 
vada was a thing of the bygone days and 
that there would be no mining in the future 
except by heavily capitalized companies. 
Where or how this idea got started it is hard 
to tell but it has been so well and so often 
repeated that many people have come to 
believe mining is now corralled by the big 
companies and that no one else has the 
ghost of a show. This is not true. There 
are hundreds of small mining opportunities 
going begging for the want of a few thou- 
sand dollars to carry on with. This is true, 
loo, of well-known but abandoned mines on 
the old Mother Lode. There are hundreds 
of "bonanzas" in the dumps of the old aban- 
doned mines. The Central Eureka, Sutter 
Creek, is operating at capacity. Fremont 
Consolidated and Bunker Hill are being oper- 
ated again, after months of being shut down. 
These mines have been rehabilitated and the 
ore that was formerly thought unprofitable 
on account of its low grade may not be 
milled at a profit. Grass Valley and vicinity 
is humming with the preliminary activities 
which presages one of the most active seasons 
in the history of that famous section of 
California. 

The news comes from Reno of increased 
excitement over the new strikes in the Pea- 
vine district. The news shows that there is a 
steadiness in the development and that while 
the values do not go up into "picture cards," 
the veins are wide and consistently bearing 
in values. 

Goldfield, too, has a good report to make 
of itself and there are good values in many 
of the mines. This is notably true of the 
"Crackerjack." From Austin, Nevada, the 
Austin Nevada Consolidated is reported to 
have uncovered a ledge nearly a hundred 
feet wide which is said to eclipse anything 
in the gold-silver bearing discoveries in the 
history of the State. 



February 12, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



Work-Day For Judges 



guinea," became known wherever the English 
language was spoken, for the old doctor was 
a great advertiser. 



CALIFORNIA would do well to copy the 
proposed law from New York estab- 
lishing a work-day for judges, who 
now work as they please. In San Francisco 
the judicial laxity with regard to work in re- 
turn for salaries is almost scandalous. 

The proposed law for New York has been 
drawn by Supreme Court Justice Benedict. 
A convention of judges, lawyers and legisla- 
tors is to consider it next summer before 
action by the Legislature. A case of judicial 
neglect in New York, which has been given 
publicity involves a judge's trip to Europe, 
without asking anybody's permission. No 
one stopped him, nobody inquired into his 
absence. He adjourned court, and after ex- 
tended travel in Europe came home and col- 
lected his salary as if he had been attending 
to his work every day. 

We could easily match that negligence in 
California where we have twice if not four 
times too many judges. 

By the County Court system, which has 
been devised in England and been found 
satisfactory forty judges perform most of 
the judicial work necessary for forty millions 
of people. 

Almost every county in California, how- 
ever small, attempts to maintain the dignity 
of a court house, thereby causing utterly 
needless and foolish extravagance. In the 
larger counties of California, like San Fran- 
cisco, Los Angeles and Alameda the ex- 
cessive number of police and superior judges 
is a crime against the taxpayers. The people 
cannot afford it and the revolt against the 
extravagant system must take the form of a 
demand for a new State Constitution which 
may lead to economical form of government. 
It can hardly make taxation worse. 

With judges performing a few days work 
there should be a material reduction of ex- 
pense in all the courts. 

Under the English County Court system, 
which has been found so beneficial the 
judges go on circuit. That would have sev- 
eral advantages in California with its sparse 
population. The judicial work could be 
carried along without loss of time. Lawyers 
would know that circuit judges would arrive 
at the county court house on schedule time, 
and all cases should be ready for trial. There 
would be less of that grand-stand business 
now so dear to the hearts of law officers in 
the counties, who look upon some unim- 
portant case or other, to give them State- 
wide celebrity. The bucolic barristers de- 
liver themselves of unnecessary orations and 
the local newspapers make the event a case 
celebre. All that delay costs the taxpayers 
money. 



Delays would be fewer if circuit judges 
came along and compelled local lawyers to 
be ready with their cases and cut short all 
the unnecessary oratory intended to give the 
orators glory and help them to nominations 
for the State Legislature or some other politi- 
cal job. 

It is just beginning to dawn on the Ameri- 
can people that taxation may become con- 
fiscation. In fact it already has advanced 
to that stage, but our country is so rich that 
taxpayers have not considered seriously the 
possible damages of supporting an army of 
official drones. 

We have the most expensive form of gov- 
ernment which could be devised, for it rep- 
resents a triple cost to the people. 

First of all we have our United States 
Government to support, and that is a matter 
of billions of dollars, with the probability of 
increase for military emergencies. Then we 
have our State government, with all its un- 
necessary and costly trimmings — commis- 
sions to promote hygiene, to create the spirit 
of brotherly love, to do many things that the 
citizens should be left to perform themselves. 
In addition to the United States Govern- 
ment and that of the individual States, we 
have our municipalities proportionately cum- 
bersome and extravagant. The result is that 
the biggest business in the United States is 
politics and the people's energies are being 
sapped to support all the official parasites 
that have fastened on the commonwealth. 



FOUNDATION OF LARGE FORTUNE 

Adrian Beecham, the sixteen-year-old son 
of Sir Thomas Beecham, the producer, and 
the conductor of London's finest opera, bids 
fair to maintain his father's musical reputa- 
tion. He has written an opera entitled "The 
Merchant of Venice," which will be pro- 
duced in London. 

This work is by no means young 
Beecham's first musical achievement. He 
started composing at the age of six and has 
written two other operas, a ballet and smaller 
works. 

He is a good pianist and has a working 
knowledge of most orchestral instruments. 

For his latest composition he selected parts 
of Shakespeare's play. The whole work, in- 
cluding the orchestration, is his own. 

Lady Beecham, his mother, will be one of 
the producers of the new opera. 

The large family fortune which has en- 
abled Sir Thomas Beecham to gratify his 
taste for music was made in the manufacture 
of the famous pills compounded by the baro- 
net's father. Dr. Beecham. The legend on 
the pill boxes; "only a shilling, worth a 



PUBLIC SERVICE SURE LOSS 

On the eve of his retirement from public 
office, Postmaster General Albert S. Burleson 
has explained why the post office has not 
shown a surplus. Why go into details? The 
post office is not supposed to show a surplus. 
If it did the money would be seized instantly 
and applied to some political extravagance. 
But the post office should be able to pay 
expenses with ease. That it does not, nor 
ever will, is proof of the great gulf between 
private and public business. The post office 
under private management conducted as a 
private enterprise, could make large profits. 
In other words, were private management 80 
per cent efficient the post office might show 
40 — more likely less. That comparison indi- 
cates what San Francisco can expect from 
her municipal projects. 



"Some of those Soviet people are pretty 
much worried about the winter." 

"I thought mebbe they would be," re- 
joined Farmer Corntossel. "The trouble 
with sovietism, as far as I can make out, is 
too much soap-box and not enough wood- 
box." 



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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 1921 




ociot 




— News of the engagement of Miss Elise 
Hughes and Mr. Hampton Lynch has reached 
here from New York. Mr. Lynch is the son 
of a California woman, who was Miss Lucy 
Moffitt, a daughter of Mrs. James Moffitt 
of Piedmont and a niece of Dr. Herbert 
Moffitt of ian Francisco, so the announce- 
ment is of special interest here. Mr. Lynch 
is one of the five children of Mr. and Mrs. 
John H. Lynch, who live at 410 Park ave- 
nue, New York, and who have a country 
place at Ridgefield, Connecticut. He is a 
cousin of Miss Alice Moffitt and Mr. James 
Moffitt. and of Miss Marguerite Doubleday 
of New York. His sister is Miss Madelaine 
Lynch, and his brothers are Messrs. Simpson, 
Russell and John H. Lynch, Jr. Mr. Hamp- 
ton Lynch was graduated from Yale with the 
class of 1915 and served as a captain of field 
artillery in France. Miss Hughes is a 
daughter of Mrs. Grenville Parker of New 
York. She is a graduate of the Brearley 
School and was a debutante of last year. 
She is a member of the Junior League. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Norris King Davis expect 
to leave early in the summer for the southern 
part of the State, where they hope to spend 
the greater part of every year. For some 
time past, Mrs. Davis has been enjoying the 
summers in Montecito, where she has a host 
of friends, and during her visit there she pur- 
chased a tract of land, where she is now 
building the future home. It will be com- 
pleted by the warm weather and the family 
will immediately take possession of it for 
an indefinite stay. Since her return from the 
East where, with her daughters, Miss Ruth 
and Miss Nancy Davis, she .passed a portion 
of the late summer, Mrs. Davis has been at 
her home in San Mateo. 

— Miss Margaret Buckbee was the princi- 
pal guest at a large tea dance given Satur- 
day afternoon by Miss Doris and Miss 
Marian Wirtner at their home in Vallejo 
street. Those receiving with the hostesses 
and Miss Buckbee were Miss Laura Miller, 
Miss Mary Julia Crocker, Miss Vere de Vere 
Adams, Miss Newell Bull, Mrs. Philip Fin- 
nell, Miss Katherine Stoney, Miss Anita 
Berendson, Miss Helen Brack, Miss Jane 
Carrigan, Miss Elvira Colburn, Miss Marian 
and Miss Marjorie Dunne, Miss Gladys Little, 
Miss Frances Lent, Mrs. Albert Lang, Miss 
Ruth Prior and Miss Katherine Bentley. 
Mrs. Samuel Buckbee and Mrs. Stephen 
Nerney poured tea. 

— Mr. Frederick Kohl has offered his .place 
at Burlingame as a home for 134 Polish 
children, who are now in Japan, having been 



taken there from Siberia. The children will 
be brought to this country from Japan by 
relief societies and will occupy the Kohl 
house for a year. 

"The Oaks," as the Kohl place is appro- 
priately named, is one of the most beautiful 
homes down the peninsula and was built 
seven years ago. It is attractively situated 
on a hill in a grove of oaks, and overlooks 
the bay and hills beyond. The Mills place 
adjoins the Kohl estate on the north, and the 
Cheever Cowdin place is nearby. The house 
is copied after an old English residence and 
is so typically Elizabethian that it has been 
used for a setting for a moving picture play 
of old England. Geraldine Farrar was the 
star of the play, and Mr. Kohl entertained 
her and members of her company while they 
were acting at "The Oaks." 

— Miss Janice Ewer gave a dinner dance 
Thursday evening at the St. Francis and had 
for guests Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Rethers, 
Jr., Miss Elizabeth Magee, Miss Laura Miller. 
Miss Elizabeth Watt. Miss Katherine Stoney, 
Miss Dorothy Grissim. Miss Virginia Smith. 
Miss Margaret Buckbee; Messrs. Alwyn 
Ewer, Monroe Greenwood, Paul Kennedy, 
Coy Filmer, John Miller, Preston Baillhache, 
George Walker and John Frederick. Miss 
Ewer and her mother have come to town 
from their home in Rutherford to pass a few 
days at the St. Francis. 

— Miss Marian Leigh Mailliard, whose en- 
gagement has been announced to Dr. Walter 
Baldwin, was the guest for whom Mrs. 
Frederick Peterson gave a luncheon at her 
apartment in Van Ness avenue. Others 
there were Mrs. Marshall Madison, Mrs. 
Somers Peterson, Mrs. Ward Mailliard, Mrs. 
James Lowe Hall, Mrs. Francis Langton, 
Mrs. Charles Buckingham, Mrs. Howard 
Naffziger, Mrs. Ralston Page, Mrs. Vernon 
Skewes-Cox, Mrs. Effingham Sutton and Miss 
Olga Simpson of Los Angeles. The marriage 
of Miss Mailliard and Dr. Baldwin will take 
place within a few weeks. 

— Mrs. Frederick W. Bradley entertained 
at a delightful luncheon recently at her home 
in Pacific avenue. Those wre enjoyed the 
affair were: Mesdames Andrew Welch, 
Samuel Boardman, John Davis, Reginald 
Knight Smith, Ernest Stent. Milton Esberg, 
Frank King, Frank Dray, Charles Stetson 
Wheeler, George Forderer, Frank Fuller, 
James Vlack, U. S. Grant III, Grant Self- 
ridge, Sydney Cloman, George Harry Men- 
dell, Jr., R. B. Burmister. 

— The last meeting of the Winter Frolics 



took place Saturday evening at the St. 
Francis. It was a fancy dress party. All 
the young people appeared in pink or red 
dominoes or pierrot costumes, and the effect 
was unusually pretty. The patronesses of 
the dancing club were Mrs. Andrew Welch, 
Mrs. Cullen Welty. Mrs. James Hall Bishop, 
Mrs. Charles F. Jackson and Mrs. Reginald 
Knight Smith. 

Miss Francesco Deering, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Deering, gave a dinner in 
advance of the dance at the Deering home 
on Russian Hill. The guests included Miss 
Alice Moffit, Miss Marie Welch, Miss Sophia 
Brownell, Miss Eleanor Morgan, Willard 
Drown, Jr.. Merrill Morsehead, Roland John- 
son, Victor Brune and Dana Fuller. 

— Mrs. Charles Farquarson gave a buffet 
luncheon on Wednesday at her home in Sea 
Cliff. Sixteen friends were entertained, 
among them Mrs. Alexander Keyes, Mrs. 
Danforth Boardman, Mrs. Willard Wayman, 
Mrs. Eugene Lent, Mrs. Forrest Cary, Mrs. 
Ferdinand Stephenson, Mrs. Frank Fuller, 
Mrs. William Weir and Mrs. George Forderer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Winfield Scott Davis have 
sold their house in Presidio Terrace to Mr. 
and Mrs. Leonard Earle Wood. Mr. and 
Mrs. Davis will soon leave for Ross Valley, 
where they have a country home and where 
they will spend the spring and summer. 

— Among the informal luncheons at the 
St. Francis Monday was that at which Mrs. 
Rudolph Spreckels was hostess. In her party 
were Mrs. Robert Oxnard, Mrs. George Pope 
2nd Mrs. Daniel T. Murphy. 

Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



. Market 2915 



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Gold. Silver. Nickel, Copper and Brass Plating 

Work of every description plated 
Silver Plated Copper Mining Plates for Saving Gold 

1349-51 Misaion Street 
Between 9th and 10th San Francisco. Cal. 











Confidence 

is the first essential to sucess- 
ful advertising or successful 
merchandising — t he c o n f i- 
dence of the public in the 
words you say and the goods 
you sell. As merchants of 
Women's Apparel, Willard's 
banks upon public confidence. 

Willard's 

Geary Street 

Between Grant and Stockton 











February 12. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



SILVER WEDDINGS 

In these days of materialistic philosophy, 
when people are so engrossed with their 
momentary projects of self interest, that 
sentiment is banished from their daily lives, 
the delightful celebration of a silver wedding 
anniversary enjoys a rare and admirable dis- 
tinction. To minds saturated with prosiness 
but appreciative of the sentiments worth 
while, it comes like the sweet chimes of far 
off evening bells, or the soft echo of a fine 
old song of love and happiness, floating in 
the twilight. 

Such must have been the thoughts of 
many guests at the beautiful ceremony on 
Monday evening, February 7, which signal- 
ized the twenty-fifth anniversary of the wed- 
ding of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove, who, 
for a quarter of a century, have occupied an 
honorable and prominent position in the 
social life of our community and added con- 
stantly to their well deserved popularity. 

Twenty-five years is but a moment in the 
history of our world, thousands of centuries 
old, but a quarter of a single century is a 
broad span in the life of any human couple. 
Many great events have been recorded in the 
histories of our State and Nation during the 
period which has elapsed since Mr. and Mrs. 
Cosgrove stood at the altar to record the 
pledge of "better or worse," which has lost 
some of its former significance. What a 
reminiscent moment it must have been for 
the much esteemed couple as at the twenty- 
fifth milestone of their propitious journey in 
life, to look around and see how many of 
their beloved friends had accompanied them. 
In this case the retrospective was happily one 
of pleasure, for a surprising number of those 
friends who attended the original ceremony 
had survived to surround them and offer 
felicitations at the silver wedding. 

Monseignor Ramm, who had not attained 
that clerical eminence, when, as the eloquent 
and popular Father Ramm of St. Mary's 
Cathedral, he performed the wedding cere- 
mony for Mr. and Mrs. Cosgrove twenty-five 
years ago, was present at the silver celebra- 
tion to extend his blessing to the couple. In 
a happy speech of congratulation the distin- 
guished clergyman showed that time had not 
robbed him of his gift of eloquence. 

The celebration took place in the rooms 
of the Business and Professional Women's 
Club, of which Mrs. Cosgrove is a director 
and member of the executive committee. 
The decorations in blue and gold were elab- 
orate and beautiful and the floral presenta- 
tions many and delightful. Of appropriate 
gifts in silver there was a rich profusion. 

The silver wedding was the first affair held 
in the club rooms. 

Dancing was continued until 10 o'clock 
by the 210 guests who had been bidden to 
the ceremony. An elaborate supper followed. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Osgood Hooker celebrated 
their silver wedding anniversary Sunday at 



their home in Burlingame. The wedding was 
a fashionable event of twenty-five years ago. 
Mrs. Hooker was Miss Ella Goad, daughter 
of the late Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Goad, and 
was one of the most beautiful girls of society. 
The marriage took place at the Goad home, 
Washington and Gough streets, at 5 o'clock 
in the afternoon. The bridal party came 
down the grand stairway led by the ribbon 
bearers, Robert M. Eyre, Milton Latham. 
Maxwell McNutt, Ernest Folger and Nicholas 
Kettle. They stretched white ribbons across 
the hall, making an aisle. Miss Aileen and 
Miss Genevieve Goad were the bride's attend- 
ants. They were dressed alike in white tulle 
frocks over white satin and carried large 
bunches of red roses. The bride and bride- 
groom stood in front of a trellis of American 
Beauty roses while the ceremony was per- 
formed by the late Rev. R. C. Foute. After 
the ceremony the bride and bridegroom left 
for a northern trip and on their return accu- 
pied a cottage in Sausalito. 



A NEW DEPARTURE AT TECHAU'S 

Always in the forefront of progressive 
movements, Mr. A. C. Morrisson, manager 
of the Techau Tavern, has announced an 
entirely new policy in the matter of prices 
which have just taken effect at this noted 
cafe and restaurant. All cover charges have 
been abolished, except on the Saturday, 
Sunday and Holiday evenings, and the 
famous repast from this noted cuisine may 
now be enjoyed at the most reasonable rate 
of $1.75 for a full course dinner. The regu- 
lar luncheon is reduced from 95c to 85c. 
The usual entertainment, cabaret. Revue 
Features and Dancing, together with the 
usual wonderful music and harmony makers, 
the Techau Tavern Dance Orchestra, is still 
prevailing, and with the Three White Kuhns 
offers an enviable program of amusement 
and entertainment. 



WOULD DELIGHT LUCULLUS 

Lucullus may have been the prince of 
ancient epicures, and thought nothing of 
spending ten thousand dollars on a satisfac- 
tory dinner, but it would make the eyes of 
the luxurious old Roman general pop out, if 
he could return to earth and see what can 
be served at Cafe Marquard, for less than a 
dollar. 

For instance, twenty-six elaborately pre- 
pared dishes to choose from at the Cafe 
Marquard's Continental luncheon, served 
daily from I I : 30 to 2 : 30 for 90 cents. The 
Business Men's luncheon, 75 cents, is even 
more surprising. The Dinner Supreme and 



After-Theatre Supper, with entertainment 
and dancing from six p. m. to one a. m., 
represent a new stage in cafe luxury, at mod- 
erate cost. The Cafe Marquard is in a class 
by itself. Lucullus reincarnated would spend 
a large part of his time at Geary and Mason 
streets studying the Cafe Marquard bills of 
fare. 



DELIGHTFUL DINNER DANCES 

A welcome announcement is that by Man- 
ager Linnard of the Fairmont Hotel, that 
there will be Saturday dinner dances at his 
splendid house, at the price of two dollars 
and no cover charge. 

The orchestras at the Fairmont are always 
a delight, and it would be impossible to find 
a more beautiful setting for a dinner dance 
than the exquisite Venetian Room where 
those much appreciated Saturday affairs are 
given. 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

Gus' Fashion 

The MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT 

65 Post Slreel. Near Market Slreet. 
Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carle. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners. 

FISH AND CAME A SPECIALTY 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Office*— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



PROMPT SERVICE 

is a feature of our daily luncheon. You can 
dine here in 30 minutes or lew if you wish 

SPECIAL LUNCHEON. $1.00 

OR SHORT ORDERS A LA CARTE 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNER, $1.75 

Sunday and Week Dayi 

DANCING 

6 TO 9 EVERY EVENING 

BERGEZ-FRANKS 

Old POODLE-DOG Co. 

421 BUSH STREET, ABOVE KEARNY 
Phone Douglat 2411 



Most Pleasant Time of the Year at 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

To Enjoy Sports and Social Pleasures 
CARL S. STANLEY MANAGER 




Would You Preserve Yonr Lustrous Eyes? 

Use Murine Eye Remedy 



9AL.VE 



No Dressing Table Complete Without 
Murine As An Eye Tonic 



LIQUID 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



faomobjh 




Pacific Auto Show 

With the opening of the Fifth Annual 
Pacific Auto Show, to be staged in this city's 
Exposition Audi orium, but one week away, 
motor car distributors and dealers are keyed 
up to a high p tch of excitement. They are 
once more making preparations to capture 
National honors for their annual event — and 
this year it would seem that recognition is 
nearer than ever before. Already the lead- 
ing hotels of the city declare that reserva- 
tions are pouring in for show week and it is 
prophesied that the show this year will draw 
more people than any event outside of the 
National Convention that the city has staged 
for the last year. 

Hill-Climbing Triumph 

The Paige scored a hill-climbing triumph 
when it ascended to the summit of Twin 
Peaks carrying four passengers and locked 
in high gear. The two-and-a-half-mile climb 
to the summit is abundant with curves of 
every known variety, and the combination 
of curve and grade has proved the Waterloo 
of many cars attempting to climb the down- 
town hill in high gear. Piloted by J. H. 
Burge, sales manager for the H. A. Seller 
Company, Paige distributors here, the car 
swung into the steep climb at 25 miles per 
hour, and not once, during the torturous 
ascent did it drop below this speed. The 
car was stock in every respect. 

Max Arnold, prominent local motor car 
dealer, has announced that he has renewed 
his contract with the reorganized King 
Motors Company, for a period of years. 
Arnold's activities in the interests of the King 
cars have, in the past, been aggressive and 
prosperous. 

Chevrolet Appointment 

R. H. Mulch, a veteran official of the 
Chevrolet Motor Company, has been ap- 
pointed sales manager of the Pacific Coast 
Chevrolet factory at Oakland! Mulch ar- 
rived from New York last week to succeed 
R. C. Durant, who retires from the sales 
managership March 1 to join his father. W. 
C. Durant, in the production of the new 
Durant car. Mulch is recognized as one of 
the biggest men in the Chevrolet organiza- 
tion, a fact which is proven by his appoint- 
ment to the important Pacific Coast post. 



Six-Minute Ferry Progressing 

With the official indorsement of the San 
Francisco Motor Car Dealers' Association be- 
hind them, in addition to a large number of 
indorsements from city councils, other lead- 
ing organizations and well known individuals, 
the Six-Minute Ferry Company is pushing 
forward its plans with surprising rapidity. 
That its plans to begin actual operation of 
the new automobile ferry system between 
San Francisco and Oakland will go through 
without delay is evidenced by the genuine 
interest shown in the project by the visitors 
to the Oakland Automobile show, where the 
company maintained a booth. 

How to Focus Headlights 

Headlights are put on a car to show the 
driver the way. The more light that can be 
concentrated on the road, the safer night 
driving will be. 

To tell if your lamps are in focus or not 
turn out the garage lights and direct one of 
the headlights against the wall. The car 
should be ten to fifteen feet away from the 
wall. Turn out the other headlight, as only 
one at a time can be tested. 

The light will produce one of three effects. 
First, with a dark center in a clear spot, 
meaning lamp is too far back; second, very 
blurry light — lamp too far back, and third, 
a perfectly clear round effect, denoting lamp 
properly focused. 

Focus — Adjustment number 2. Filament 
behind focus, without modifying device, 
largest beam across section, without dark 
center. 

Tilt — Without modifying device and with 
car fully loaded, beam axis must be hori- 
zontal and parallel. 

If a clear spot of light appears, the lamp 
bulb is properly focused — that is, it is in 
such a position with respect to (he parabolic 
reflector that the rays of reflected light go 



February 12, 1921 

straight out in a concentrated beam. Fila- 
ment a trifle behind focus. 

If the lamp is too far forward in the re- 
flector, the efficiency of the light is practic- 
ally destroyed by the criscrossing of the rays. 
The spot on the wall will show this. 

If the lamp bulb is too far back in the 
reflector it spreads the rays forward, leaving 
a dark spot in the center. 

Having determined the trouble, you can 
move the lamp forward or backward, as the 
case may be, until the lamp is properly 
focused. 

After both headlights have been properly 
focused, take the car out on a dark road and 
move both headlights on their brackets until 
the combined rays hit the ground at the de- 
sired distance ahead of the car. 

The adjustment for proper focus can be 
made on the road also if necessary. Direct 
the light down close to the car and move the 
light bulb back and forth in the reflector 
until the light on the road is clean and as 
free from black spots as possible. 

To Clean Your Top 

Do not use gasoline or other quick action 
solvents to clean the top if it is mohair, and 
any top interior because these fluids will 
destroy the waterproofing of the material. 
Use soap and water only. 

Starting in an Emergency 

When the starter is not working and the 
crank handle cannot be found it is possible 
to start the engine by jacking up the rear 
wheels and shifting into high. The cylinders 
must be primed and the spark and throttle 
levers set. The engine is started by turning 
the rear wheel taking hold of the tire rather 
than the spoke. Care should be taken to 
avoid getting caught when the wheels start 
to revolve. 

At the fourteenth motor exhibition re- 
cently held at the Olympia, in London, more 
than 80 types of automobiles were listed by 
the British. The United States was second 
with 41 cars. France had 26 exhibits, the 
Italians 10 and the Belgians, Dutch and 
Swiss one each. America had the distinction 
of showing the lowest priced automobile. 

Financial Fallacy 

Management is a vital necessity in any 
business. A good manager puts money into 
the pockets of both consumer and employee. 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



February 12, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



For instance, in the case of the United 
States Steel Corporation, it has been figured 
out that if all the so-called salaried men 
were eliminated, including officials, managers 
and salesmen, and this money were dis- 
tributed among the working force, the pay 
of each worker would be increased just five 
cents a day. 

The American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company estimates that if it eliminated ail 
the men receiving more than $5000 a year, 
and distributed this money among the 
workers who have been receiving less than 
$5000 a year, the average pay would be in- 
creased exactly I 7 cents a week. 

From this it is obvious that none of us can 
hope to fatten our pay envelopes by taking 
money from those who are getting more than 
we are. Our best hope of getting more 
money lies in doing our particular task so 
well that we win a higher and better-paid 
job. 

Clean Carbon With Cloth 

Clean off carbon with a cloth dipped in 
gasoline, or a brush may be used. Tough 
up the points of plugs with an emery cloth, 
but do not touch emery to glazed porcelain, 
as it scratches and makes it soot up all the 
more rapidly. A cracked core must be re- 
placed. 

It Pays to Buy Standard Makes So Tires 
Will Last 

Buying automobile tires is like buying 
eggs. All look very much alike — the bad 
ones look as good as the good ones, and the 
"no-name" tires as well as the product of 
which any manufacturer may well be proud. 

The "gyp" tire may have all the beauty 
and symmetry of the nationally known tire 
and yet be made out of shoddy. It is not 
reasonable to believe that a motorist can get 
a tire "just as good" as a standard make for 
half the price. 

In tire mileage it is not first costs that 
count but costs per mile. Adding the cost 
of repairs to the purchase price and divid- 
ing by the mileage, will quickly convince 
even the most confirmed bargain hunter. 

Testing Carburetor Mixture 

You can soon tell if the carburetor mix- 
ture is correct by opening the pet-cocks at 
the tops of the cylinders (if the engine has 
them) one at a time and noting the color 
of the flame which emerges from the cylin- 
der while the engine is running. If the flame 
is a faint blue, the mixture is correct; if it is 
red, too much gasoline is being consumed: 
and if the flame is yellow the mixture is too 
lean. 

To Test Oil 

One test to ascertain the quality of lubri- 
cating oil is to heat a small quantity and 



hold a flame to the thin smoke which arises. 
This smoke will flash or catch fire for an 
instant, and if the oil is of good grade will 
flash much quicker than a poor oil. 

"Have you a little fairy in your home?" 
"No, but I have a little miss in my engine." 

Spare the Spares — Let Them Do Work 

Many truck owners using pneumatic tire: 
have found that it is best to give the spare 
tires an occasional dose of work; that is to 
say, shift the tires around so that each one 
in turn gets a chance to act the part of 
spare. Light and atmospheric conditions 
have an ill effect upon rubber and in many 
cases the spare is damaged more than the 
tires in actual service. 

To Clean Windshield 

A mixture of glycerine, salt and water may 
be used to help keep the windshield clean in 
winter. Four ounces of glycerine, two ol 
water and a couple of drams of salt will be 
enough for two or more applications. Clean 
the glass first with water, dry and apply with 
a cloth by rubbing in straight lines. 

Dangerous Lights 

In spite of the law requiring non-glare 
lenses, one sees many cars on the road which 
blind the approaching driver as well as pedes- 
trians. Sometimes the roads are dark and 
rough, but the driver should realize that a 
glaring headlight not only endangers himself 
but others. It endangers himself because the 
driver of a car approaching is helpless and 
in his effort to keep on the road may very 
easily crowd the other fellow into the ditch 
or drive head-on into him. Self-preserva- 
tion, therefore, requires strict heed as to how 
one's lights shine, if the penally of the law 
does not. 



The law requires suitable lenses to keep 
the beam of light below the eyes of the 
driver and pedestrian. The exact height 
varies in different States, but it is not far 
from forty-two inches from the roadway. 
The lens is supposed to throw the light down- 
ward to the roadway and also to each side, 
so that the entire roadway is illuminated. 
There are a number of lenses which are 
supposed to do this and each bears the ap- 
proval of State officials. But many cars are 
not equipped with non-glare devices. In a 
busy block where many cars are parked it 
was recently noticed that about half a dozen 
out of fifty were properly equipped. Some 
of the cars may have used lamps of such 
low candle power that they would not be a 
menace, but the law requires an approved 
lens regardless of the candle power of the 
lamp. 

An approved lens alone is not a sufficient 
safeguard. It is all right if the lamp is set 
according to directions which come with the 
lens. The lamp, properly set, will throw 
light to the reflector at such an angle that 
the rays will be reflected to the lenses in a 
proper way and there be refracted so that 
they illumine the roadway properly, but a 
slight change in the focus of the lamp may 
throw the light rays upward instead of down- 
ward, or throw them in a straight beam of 
light, which would be blinding to any one 
who came within its range. The purpose of 
the lens is to bend the rays to the proper 
direction, but it can only be done when the 
focus of the lamp is accurate. It is apparent 
that a car might be equipped with the proper 
lens and yet be dangerous, since the intent 
is to diffuse light so that, while the roadway 
is properly illuminated, the rays of light do 
not strike the eyes of a driver approaching, 
or a pedestrian and blind him. 



POLICYHOLDERS SURPLUS $4,312,904.00 

EARTHQUAKE - FIRE - AUTOMOBILE 

YOU LIVE IN UNITED STATES 
INSURE IN UNITED STATES 

United States Fire Insurance Co. 



Pacific Department 

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INCORPORATED 1824 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Harold Junker 

Manager 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Co, in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 

TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 1921 




PL/EASUR.E/S WAND 



"On With the Dance" at Orpheum 

William Seabury and bis lovely ladies are 
indefatigable, and so it would seem are their 
admirers at the Orpheum, for we find them 
still applauding roundly. A charming feature 
on the bill this week is the Ushers' playlet 
called "The Bide-A-Wee Home." Murray 
Kissen and a talented company presents A 
Hungarian Rhapsody." A remarkably clever 
chap with cards is Herbert Brooks. "Her 
Only Chance," with Belle Montrose is an old 
idea disguised in a new suit of clothes. The 
presiding genius of the musical end of the 
Orpheum, Raymond Bone, shakes a mean 
ole stick. Personally the writer would ex- 
press Mr. Bone's masterful wielding of the 
baton in other words, but those were the 
enthusiastic utterances of our sixteen-year- 
old escort and are here recorded. 



"Obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

a program most admirable in its contrasts of 
light and shade. 

The soloist was Arthur Argiewicz who re- 
ceived no less than five recalls for his bril- 
liant presentation of Saint-Saens' "Introduc- 
tions et Rondo Capriccioso." For this num- 
ber Leader Hertz yielded the baton to Con- 
certmaster Louis Persinger, who also was 
compelled to share in the enthusiastic re- 




Hilarious Wedlock at Alcazar 

Matrimony in its many phases, the ro- 
mantic, the practical, the farcical, embodied 
in an amusing three-act comedy and enacted 
by our dependable artists of the Alcazar, is 
luring the pleasure-seeker to O'Farrell street 
this week. How any one as good looking as 
Dudley Ayres could expect a girl to collabor- 
ate on an opera and not fall in love with 
him, is a mystery to me. She fell, all right 
enough, just as all the rest of us have done! 
And it was not Elwyn Harvey this time, but 
Nina Guilbert; Miss Harvey loved and 
landed Ben Erway. It upset all our Alcazar 
traditions, and left Emily Pinter to the tender 
mercies of Rafael Brunetto, which she ap- 
peared to enjoy. 

Between the first and second acts the 
audience listened to an eloquent appeal from 
the Consul General of China and Attorney 
Timothy Healy, on behalf of the starving 
millions of China. 



A Delighted Audience 

It was a delighted audience which listened 
on Sunday to the program of the "popular" 
concert of the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra at the Curran Theatre which 
opened with the "Phedre" overture of Mas- 
senet. Three selections from Berlioz's "The 
Damnation of Faust," — the "Minuet des 
Follets," "Danse des Sylphs," and the 
"Rakoczy" march were the next offerings 
and all acceptable to the extent that the audi- 
ence forgot all about the rule against 
encores. 

The second part of the program contained 
Liszt's second "Rhapsodie Hongroise," Wag- 
ner's "Traume," Dvorak's "Humoresque," 
Schubert's "The Bee," and the Rienzi over- 
ture. Leader Alfred Hertz had thus selected 



Orpheum's New Stars 

Elizabeth Brice is next week's Orpheum 
headliner in "Love Letters." She will be 
assisted by Gattison Jones. Since her return 
from entertaining the American Expedi- 



tionary forces. Miss Brice has been in acute 
demand in the theatres. Her first step after 
returning here was to present to Orpheum 
audiences her "Over Seas Revue," a con- 
densation of the piece she gave the soldiers. 
San Franciscans recall seeing her last year in 
the condensation, which enjoyed a highly 
successful Orpheum season. Then Miss Brice 
entered musical comedy and was seen 
throughout the East in "Buzzin' Around." 
Her next move was to provide Orpheum vau- 
deville fans with "Love Letters," which is 
described as a sort of retrospective musical 
revue of the sentimental past. Edgar Allan 
Woolf fashioned the books and lyrics of the 
skit. 




ELIZABETH BRICE 
Who Will Appear at the Orpheum Next Week '" "Love Letters" 



February 12, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



Other welcome newcomers at the Orpheum 
next week will be: 

Jack McLallen and May Carson will show 
just how laughable a matter it is to be funny 
on roller skates. 

For the first time in the many years since 
San Franciscans have known J. C. Nugent 
as a vaudeville sketchologist, he is coming 
next week as a "single." Nugent now does 
a monologue. 

Humorous pranks related in song and 
story should furnish a decidedly agreeable 
15 minutes next week while Kenney and 
Hollis, the original college boys, are on the 
stage in "The Two Doctors." 

A singer with "gold" in her voice is what 
Dora Hilton will be found to be. 

Creators of novelties, Percy Oakes and 
Pamela Delour will be viewed in cyclonic 
evolutions. 

Shadowgraphs of farm yard and wild ani- 
mals, portraits a la silhouette of prominent 
men, and pictures of up-to-date events will 
be created by the Gordon Wilde family. 
Connie Wilde is well known as premiere 
shadowist the world over. 

Only two acts remain from the current 
week. Claud and Fannie Usher with their 
"Bide-A-Wee Home" and "Step Lively," 
rapid cycle with Mildred Rogers. 



Fine Symphony Features 

Kajetan Attl will be the soloist at Sunday 
afternoon's concert in the Curran Theatre 
by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
under the direction of Alfred Hertz. He 
will play Saint-Saens' harp concerto in G 
major, it being the first performance of this 
work in San Francisco. Another composi- 
tion to be presented for the first time here 
Sunday is "The Russian Easter" overture of 
Rimsky-Korsakow. The second half of the 
program will consist of Schumann's melo- 
dious first symphony in B flat major. 

On the following Sunday afternoon the 
next to the last popular concert of the season 
will be given with Horace Britt as soloist. 
He will play three cello solos: Faure's 
"Romance," "The Swan" of Saint-Sacns and 
Glazounow's "Serenade Espagnole." The 
principal orchestral numbers will be Grieg's 
second Peer Gynt Suite, the Festival Over- 
ture of Lassen and two ballet numbers from 
Saint-Saens' "Samson and Delilah." The re- 
mainder of the program is made up of 
Gounod's Funeral March of a Marionette, 
the Norwegian Wedding Procession of Grieg. 
Valse Triste by Sibelius, Tschaikowsky's 



Theme with Variations from the third orches- 
tra suite, the Per.petuum Mobile of Johann 
Strauss. 



Alcazar's Next Play 

"Our Wives," a merry comedy at the 
Alcazar this week, will be followed next Sun- 
day by the first local presentation of "The 
Ouija Board," a mystery melodrama of ele- 
mental thrills by Crane Wilbur, an actor- 
playwright. It is a spiritualistic drama, and 
its personages include both the true believers 
and the mediumistic charlatans who prey on 
the credulity of the public. Its mystery lies 
in the tragic taking off of a trickster who is 
master mind of a band of clever crooks 
having control over a rich man because he 
believes that they can communicate with his 
dead wife; to rob him of his fortune and 
marry his daughter to his weakling of an 
adopted son who is in the scheme. The 
trickery of a spook parlor and the psychic 
stunts of automatic hand-writing are de- 
picted. 

California 

A rare feast has been prepared for us by 
Opie Read, the famous story-writer, and the 
incomparable playwright Augustus Thomas, 
in "The Jucklings." This thrilling play is 
excellently acted throughout, headed by 
Monte Blue and Mabel Scott. The San 
Francisco song writers' contest arouses much 
interest. Pathe News has an important place 
on the program, and Mr. Heller is right there 
with his splendid orchestral numbers. 



dancer, who comes to us with her wonderful 
art and a large company of artists support- 
ing her. The day of the dance is now. In 
this marvelously gifted Russian the very 
spirit of dancing lives, moves and has its 
being. She is quoted as saying that Cali- 
fornia inspires her to her very best; if that 
be true then we who have seen her dance in 
foggy London, in fickle Paris, in noisy New 
York, have something to look forward to. 



Maitland Players Present "Trilby" 

DuMaurier's delightful drama of the Paris 
Latin Quarter of the nineties has been re- 
vived by Arthur Maitland. The terrible 
Svengali was played by Mr. Maitland with 
considerable force. It is a part that has 
appealed to many of the character actors in 
England and America, as has the charm of 
Trilby O'Farrell called forth a hundred dif- 
ferent impersonations of this role by as many 
beautiful and emotional actresses. 




^ y^frfaumttxoufc Lg" 



Next Week— Starting Sunday 

Elizabeth Brice 

with Gattison Jones 



KENNEY & Hdllts 



DORA HILTON 



McLallen 
& Carson 



J. C. 

Nugent 



OAKES A I1KLOHK 



GORDON WILDE 



"STEP LIVELY' 



Claud & Fannie Usher 



Columbia 

Frank Keenan, in the simple and sombre 
drama of the North of Ireland, fills the 
Columbia every evening, despite the fact that 
it is a sad play and theatre-goers are fond of 
saying "Give us something gay, we've 
troubles of our own." But sorrow has its 
beauty, grief its soul-stirring splendor, and 
the play "John Ferguson" tells a tale of the 
life-wrecking tragedy of simple, honest folk, 
in a straightforward and absolutely convinc- 
ing manner. Plenty of comic relief next 
week, if May Robson is true to form and 
Alan Dale is as good at play-writing as he is 
at play-dissecting. It will be interesting in- 
deed to see what kind of play this iconoclast 
has to give us. 



Katlnees— 2fir t,. |i.no Bvei Inrs— 26c totl.so 

HATINER DAILY— Phone DouglM 70 

BeftlpenV Tickets Not Honored 

ALCAZAR 

THIS WEEK—Franlc Mandel's Comedy 

"OUR WIVES" 

WEEK COM. NEXT SUN. MAT.. FEB. 13 

The Shrnnc Melodrama of Spiritualistic Mystery 

by Crane Wilbur 

"THE OUIJA BOARD" 

As Recently Produced by A. H. Woods. 

NEW ALCAZAR COMPANY 

DUDLEY AYRES-ELWYN HARVEY 

SUNDAY MAT.. FEB. 20— First Time Here 

A. H. Woods' Farce Comedy Success 

"NO MORE BLONDES" 

By Otto Harbach. from a story by Edgar Franklin. 

Kvery F.venins. Matinees Sun.. Thurs.. Sal. 



Pavlowa at the Curran 

The third successful week of the grand 
opera season closes at the Curran and is fol- 
lowed on Monday by the special engagement 
of Anna Pavlowa. the world-famous Russian 



SAN FRANCISCO. 




SAMPLE DRESSES. 

SUITS AND COATS 

AT WHOLESALE PRICES 



BARGAIN HEADQUARTERS 

for 

WOMEN'S WEAR 



NO SHOP IN TOWN LIKE 

MISS JO'S 



MISS JO'S DRESS SHOP 



Rooms 361-363 PACIFIC BUILDING 

ROV L. NEUMANN. ADVCRT 



821 MARKET STREET 



ORCHESTRA 

AlfhedNcrtz Conductor. 

CONCERT SUNDAY 

CURRAN THEATRE -:- 2:45 P. M. 

KAJETAN ATTL Soloi.t 

PROGRAMME 

Overture. "The Russian Easier" ..RimJ^Jl-ACorsa^oB' 

(First time in San Francisco) 
Harp Concerto, G Major Samt-Saent 

(First lime in San Francisco) 
Symphony No. I ...Schumann 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12. 1921 



Atlantic Yacht Race 



K 



ING ALBERT of Belgium had a happy 
inspiration when he offered a cup for 
a trans-Atlantic yacht race next sum- 
mer from New York to Ostend. 

The start will be made July 4 from Sandy 
Hook regardless of weather. One gun will 
send the yachts on their voyage and the 
first to cross the finish line off Ostend Bank 
will win. There will be no time allowance 
and yachts of any size or rig will be eligible. 
Auxiliaries will be eligible, if they have their 
engines sealed. 

There have been ocean yacht races pre- 
viously, but they were matches. In 1866 
the late James Gordon Bennett's Henrietta, 
Franklin Osgood's Fleetwing and Pierre 
Lorillard's Vesta raced from Sandy Hook to 
the Needles, England, for a sweepstakes of 
$10,000 a side. The Henrietta won, her 
time being 13 days, 21 hours, 55 minutes. 

One huge sea that boarded the Fleetwing 
washed eight of her men overboard. Six of 
them were drowned. 

In 1870 the Dauntless, which had been 
purchased by Mr. Bennet, raced the Cambria 
from Cork Harbor here. The Cambria was 
coming to this country to race for the 
America's Cup. She won, making the trip 
across in 23 days, but winning by only one 
hour and 42 minutes. 

Then in 1887 the Dauntless, which had 
been purchased by Caldwell H. Colt, was 
beaten by the Coronet, owned By R. T. 
Bush. She covered the course from Bay 
Ridge, Brooklyn, to Queenstown in 14 days, 
20 hours and 30 minutes, and won by 29 
hours. 

The 1905 race for a cup given by the then 
German Emperor was the first open contest 
of the kind ever held. The remarkable time 
made by the Atlantic, which was sailed by 
the late Capt. Charles Barr, appeared to be 
a record for a sailing vessel across the ocean, 
although reports of passages of some of the 
old clipper ships were dug up to dispute it. 
One of these was a run of the clipper Dread- 
naught from here to Queenstown in 1859, 
her time being given as 9 days, I 7 hours. 

None of those, however, who sailed on the 
Atlantic would believe it. The big yacht 
could spread 36,000 square feet of sail and 
Captain Barr drove her through seas and 
winds with all the canvas he could hang 
on her. He went up over the short steam- 
ship lane, passed freight steamships as they 
were anchored and gave those aboard 
her the sail of their lives. 

When he finished the German schooner 
Hamburg, fitted out by a syndicate at the 
wish of the then Emperor with an enormous 
sail spread for her size, was only eighteen 



miles astern. The crews of both yachts were 
almost exhausted, but the Americans on the 
Atlantic were buoyed by the booming of 
guns, the bursting of rockets, the screeching 
of whistles and the cheers of thousands on 
shore that told them they had won. 

Trailing those two yachts were the Earl 
of Crawford's ship rigged Valhalla and Lord 
Thomas Brassey's Sunbeam, the British 
entries, and seven other American con- 
testants. 

In making the race open to yachts of all 
nations. King Albert had in mind the hope of 
all yachtsmen for years that if another trans- 
Atlantic contest should be arranged, entries 
might be received from half a dozen 
countries. 

Several of the large English yachts have 
been sold to Norwegians who might enter 
the race. There also are several large 
French and Spanish yachts in the Mediter- 
ranean. 

Sir Thomas Lipton has been unable to sell 
his 23-metre Shamrock, which he brought 
to this country as a trial horse for his 
America's Cup defender, and has been con- 
sidering taking her back to England. The 
ketch rig she used in coming here is intact 
at City Island. She is small but with good 
weather would be a contender if entered. 



DEL MONTE DELIGHTS THEM 

California is proving attractive at this 
season to residents of other climes. From 
the Northwest and Canada particularly there 
are a number of travelers who are taking 
advantage of the mild climate to enjoy the 
out-of-door recreations and pleasures. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Kerr of Portland, 
who have been residing at Hotel del Monte 
for the past year, are entertaining Miss I. A. 
Ellis, a relative from Scotland. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Coward and John P. 
Babcock of Vancouver are making a sojourn 
after having spent a month in Honolulu. 

Mr. and Mrs. V. Carstens of the Nether- 
lands are making a tour of the world. They 
are now stopping at Del Monte to take in ths 
places of historic and romantic interest, and 
to enjoy the out-of-door diversions, such as 
golf, polo, etc. 

Among the prominent Chicago society folk 
are Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Pebbles and Mr. and 
Mrs. R. V. Storer. 

Sir Newton and Lady Stabb of England 
are enjoying their Del Monte visit. 

Among the polo enthusiasts who have been 
enjoying many social events at Hotel del 
Monte and Del Monte Lodge during the 
course of the polo tournament are Mr. and 
Mrs. Louis H. Carpenter, Mr. and Mrs. 



Felton Elkins, Mr. and Mrs. Elvah Kaime, 
Mrs. Jane Selby Hayne, Harry Hunt, Willie 
Tevis, Col. H. B. Nutting and Eric Pedley. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Fertig of Pasadena 
have arrived at Pebble Beach to reside in 
their new home which fronts on the Pebble 
Beach golf course. 

The paper chase at Pebble Beach was par- 
ticipated in by some 35 riders who enjoyed 
a thrilling chase through the trails in the 
Del Monte forest. 

The Pebble Beach gold vase golf tourna- 
ment over Washington's birthday holiday is 
attracting much attention. There will be a 
number of out of State golfers who will take 
part in the event. 

Del Monte will be lively over Lincoln's 
birthday, February 12 and 13, when mem- 
bers of the Elks lodge and their ladies will 
stage a golf tournament and sport outing. 



"LITERARY DISARMAMENT" 

The fierce discussion about need of 
"Literary Disarmament," proves to be a 
waste of time, as it appears that new books 
are not being hurled in vast numbers on an 
unoffending public. 

The Publishers Weekly of New York has 
taken the trouble to look up the record. The 
total number of new books issued in 1920 
was 5101 ; new editions of old books, 1086. 
These 6200 books are divided into twenty- 
three classes, and no one bookseller attempts 
to carry or even consider all of them. The 
largest classification is, of course, fiction, 
with 778 new books last year and 445 re- 
issues of older titles. This latter figure may 
interest those who think that only the newest 
things get consideration. The next largest 
group is history, with 539 titles; religion, 
with 504 titles; sociology, with 396 titles; 
poetry and drama, 453 titles; children's 
books, 477 titles. The total list makes an 
interesting analysis as showing the tendency 
of American publishing. The previous year's 
total showed 4772 new books and 969 new 
editions, about a 10 per cent increase. 

Probably not more than one manuscript 
out of ten that is prepared is finally put into 
book form, so that a very heavy "disarma- 
ment" takes place under the natural course 
of events without planning a more drastic 
cutting of the list. Those who point to an 
enormous wastage in paper in books that 
should not be issued might remember that 
books use up but a small fraction of the 
paper that goes to printing, magazines use 
ten times the amount of all books. It should 
also be remembered that, just as there are 
books that we might have got along without, 
there are plays we may not have needed, 
songs that were just as well unsung, pictures 
that were better left unpainted. In the field 
of the creative arts there are bound to be 
mistakes, and our age is not going to prove 
itself different from those that have pre- 
ceded it in this respect. 






THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

1174 Phelan Building, San Francisco 

Has a practical system of placing manuscripts for 
publication, which is important to people who write. 

Frank criticism and competent revision are also 
available. 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORiE - McLaren co. 

FLORISTS, NURSERYMEN 

and 

LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 
141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Mateo 

Phone San Mateo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



CLOCK 

REPAIRING 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specialty 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

country 

We carry an attractive line of new clocks 

Work guaranteed in every detail 

CALIFORNIA CLOCK CO. 

418-19 Whitney Bldg. 133 Geary Street 

Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping, Manager 







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FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St 

Bet. Franklin and Cough 
Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept. 1919 




$ 23.828,500.00 
16,375,000.00 

23,828,500.00 - 

64,032,000.00 



.$377,721,211.00 
SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E, General Manager 

351 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian Slates, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua (New 
Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 
Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 

Agents : 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH ..Mission and 2lsl Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31. 1920 

Assets $69,878,147.01 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits ..._ 66.338.147.01 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2.540.000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund. _ $343,536.85 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER. Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

[OHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E A CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE «c ORRICK. General Attorneys 



BOND DEPARTMENT Sutter and Sansome Streets 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON PARIS Phone Kearny 5600 

NATIONAL BANK San Francisco, Calif. 

OFFERS... 

Jl selection of tight corporation bonds, to yield J mm 7"-, to c?<- c on the investment. 
The term of these carious issues is from one year to fourteen years, thus meeting the re- 
quirements of every investor. 
Our service is at your service. 
'Detailed information on request. 
For Income Tax Exempt $onds, ask for Circular T. E. 




Keaton Tire & Rubber Company 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OAKLAND 



LOS ANGELES 
PORTLAND SEATTLE 



Established July 20 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



AND 

(California AonerttBPr 
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1921 $5.00 PER YEAR 





The Burden of Proof is on the Budget Board and the Administration to 
show the necessity for the Proposed Huge Increase in Cost of the State Gov- 
ernment. 

NOTE THESE FIGURES. 

CALIFORNIA STATE APPROPRIATIONS 

Governor Johnson — 

1915-1 7 $38,311,923.76 

Governor Stephens — 

1917-19 47.937.91 1.49 

1919-21 52.786.412.73 

Proposed 1921-23 Budget $81,387,692.51 

WHY THIS ENORMOUS INCREASE? 

Amounts voted by the People last November explain a part of it. 
THE REST IS UNEXPLAINED. 

Tell your Legislator that you want More Economy — not more taxes! 
Investigate the Budget — Cut It Down! 

The State Can Live Within 
Its Normal Income 

TAX INVESTIGATION AND ECONOMY LEAGUE 
1504 Humboldt Bank Bldg. 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. 

548 Sacramento St., cor. Leidesdorff 



Fourth St. Garage 

423 4th St., near Harrison St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Excellent Service 

Convenient 

Spacious 

Tires and Accessories 

PHONE GARFIELD 600 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than seems necessary." The 
typewriter paper* are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through youi printer or stationer, or, if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the entire 
line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

E«la'blished 1855 




Chiropractic 
Oxygen Vapor 
UltraViolet Rays 

LADIES — 1 desire to announce that 1 have secured the 
services of DR. MAUD PETERSON, licensed by the State 
Board of Medical Examiners (February 16, 1907), to practice 
in the Sate of California. 

OSTEOPATHY 

Specialist in Women's and Children's Diseases. 



DR. GEO. D. GILLESPIE 



REGULARLY LICENSED DRUGLESS PHYSICIAN 

Tubercular, Organic, Nervous, Rectal, Colon, Prostalic, Chronic, Skin and Scalp Diseases. My 

Book, "DRUGLESS THERAPY," tells you why pressure on nerves causes disease. 

SEND FOR IT. MAILED FREE 

LADY ATTENDANTS CONSULTATION FREE 

335 Stockton Street En lT^LT s m n or San Francisco 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



Liny and Night Service 



Tires find Acce 



Stockton and Sutter 

- GARAGE- 

DOLSON & ANDERSON, Inc. 

410 STOCKTON STREET 

PHONE DOUGLAS 5388 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



CLUB GARAGE 

72780DTH oijivE arntEsr 

Phone Main 2368 

I."S ANGKLE8, CAL. 



DESMAN GARAGE 

900432 Bl BH CTREE] 

Phone Prosper! 956 

■>\N PKAKOISOO 



We Stand for the Best in Business Training 




..for.. 

Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 

Send for Catalog 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



Potted Plants 
and Ferns 

OF DISTINCTION 

SUITABLE FOR ANY 

OCCASION AT NURSERY 

PRICES 

Bay Counties Seed Co. and 

Nurseries 

404 Market Street, San Francisco 



><S>«*3x8>3*8*3>3xS>«*S<8>Sx8xe-«x3><s>3^^ 



^an jFrattriaro QUinmirlg 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 



A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for 90 cents a 

month— including Sunday editions. 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster. 



37-45 FIRST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 




flB 



Devoled to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1921 



No. 8 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second- 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year, $5.00. Foreign: One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

One advantage of putting Herb Hoover in the new cabinet 

would be that all the rest could take an indefinite vacation and go 
fishing. 



Why do the newspapers put a scare head over the item about 

a 25-pound gold brick found near Redding? You can get a cart 
load of them on any block on Montgomery street. 



Judge Landis is impeached for trying to make easy money. 

Give a gallery-player time enough and he'll tie himself in a hard 
knot. 



Where is that trifle of $644,000,000 that Skipofsky Kerensky 

juggled out of the United States, while he was playing Czar? Where 
are the snows of yesteryear? 



What fine reading for the honest American taxpayer, if Con- 
gress should go fully into all the details of the "loans" to Skipofsky 
Kerensky and other Russian patriots. 



What a great country these United States will be if it ever 

gets so political freaks like Judge Landis can be estimated at their 
true value, in decimal fractions of a nickel. 



Nothing in the history of the world equals the criminal waste- 

fulnes of public money, which occurred in the United States during 
the war. Is nobody going to jail for life? 



Real Americans are getting very hot in the collar as revelations 

of Emperor Woodrow's late and unlamented regime show what a 
good thing we were for those European bunco artists. 



John Considine couldn't stand the gaff as prohibition agent, so 

he has resigned and passed the buck to William J. Jordan, his deputy. 
If Bill can stand it he must have the punch of a pile driver and the 
hide of a rhinoceros. Of course, he won't. Poor Bill! 



The minute any political acrobat, like Judge Landis, begins to 

cut up didos and disgrace the honored bench of the United States, 
he ought to gel it right in the tender spot from Congress — cut off his 
pay check. 



Four more years of Democracy, and poor simple Uncle Sam 

would be carrying all the debts of bankrupt Europe and waiting at 
Johnny B's backdoor for a handout of kitchen scraps, with a swig of 
pump water to wash it down. 



These are not good days for "little navy" spielers in Congress. 

America does not like being told by foreigners what back lane on the 
high seas it must slink along, or get blown out of the bloomin' water. 
you know. 



"End foreign credits," is to be President Harding's sentiment. 

So say we all of us. President! We need all the money we have 
right at home. 



Now that Russian loans are coming up for inquiry, don't forget 

that millions were just flung at Skipofsky Kerensky, and as soon as 
he got his grip full he skipped. Like as not he has an option on a 
New York emporium, for bucket-shop operations on foreign ex- 
change. 



If we must have some dirty scandal, for the newspapers, and 

Attorney General Webb will not stand for re-trial of Gangster Brady, 
why not start on the two accused police judges, that the labor 
unions want to have shielded? Go to it, brethren of the quill — but 
it's dollars to doughnuts you won't. 



How in the world did Uncle Sam run this here country of ours, 

ever since George Washington's time, and make it a right prosperous 
strip of earth, too. before all those present-day "efficiency experts" 
blew in to tell us we're hanging by our fingers over the edge of per- 
dition, and the grass-roots are giving way? 



One would think the labor unions had enough of politics when 

Gompers got them in wrong in the Presidential election, and now 
some other purblind leader is getting them blamed for trying to save 
the besmirched police judges from recall. If union men don't wake 
up they will find themselves on the wrong side of the fence. 



We thought we disagreed with Hearst on everything, but he 

voices our own views when he says it's time to quit doping the news 
of Europe and Asia, to please European politicians. Why don't you 
get in yourself and give us the real news, William? That ought to 
be child's play for the Napoleon of the Press. And if they call 
you pet names, make them swallow it. 



Our very talented contemporary, Annie Laurie, says in her read- 
able column, that some Easterners actually like the snow, which is 
a very philosophic way of thinking when you have to sit on a stove 
six months in the year to keep from freezing. Some of them like 
a Blue Sunday, too, and a gallon of ice water in preference to a 
pint of ruby wine under their belts; but it's surprising how soon 
California civilizes them. 



These newspaper contests to develop queens of the movies are 

immensely popular. How would it be to start a few contests for 
queens of the washtub. potroast queens, queens of the scrubbing 
brush, and the baking oven? Believe me, these homely monarchs 
would have it on a great many of the bedizened beauties of the 
screen, after a few summers and winters have knocked the bloom off 
the peach, and a plate of ham and eggs is more to them than a ream 
of old newspaper clippings in a scrapbook. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19, 1921 



DIToMALv 




INVESTIGATE THE BUDGET 



TAXPAYERS were almost stunned last week when 
the News Letter presented the proofs that the present 
budget of the State Government represents a long step 
towards State bankruptcy. The News Letter's article con- 
tained no rhetorical charges against the State Budget Board, 
though they would have been justified. It said nothing of 
the responsibilities of Governor Stephens, from whom might 
have been expected a bitter denunciation of the official ex- 
travagance, instead of ardent encouragement of the plans to 
pauperize the taxpayers. 

All that the News Letter's article on the State Budget 
Board did, was to give the Board's extortionate figures and 
contrast them with the appropriations actually required. If 
anything these figures were too liberal. Had they been sug- 
gested ten years ago mass meetings of angry taxpayers would 
probably have suggested a coat of tar and feathers for the 
editor of the News Letter. So far have we gone on the road 
of extravagance, however, that public officials have come to 
the conclusion that they are elected to ruin the State instead 
of helping to make it more prosperous. 

Before the News Letter's highly instructive article 
was placed in type, the figures, confirmatory of the State 
Budget Board's wastefulness were carefully scrutinized by 
Mr. Marriott, the publisher of the News Letter, who pays 
taxes in several counties, and has made an exhaustive study 
of the fiscal requirements of the State authorities. From the 
best sources Mr. Marriott has obtained estimates of the 
amount of taxation needed by California for the next two 
years. Even without exhaustive inquiry it is easy to arrive 
at a fair estimate. We know what it cost to run the State 
in former years. We have the census to show the increase 
of population. It is a child's task to estimate the proportion 
of increased taxes to increased population. 

Although the News Letter's articles on the enormity of 
this year's estimates for State appropriations set the actual 
appropriations needed, the Sacramento authorities are ex- 
ceeding wrath over them. We shall learn what the taxpay- 
ers will say about the extravagance which we have tried to 
prevent. Eventually, at the polls, the people who suffer 
from official robbery of their hard earned money, express 
their thoughts in terms that cannot be misunderstood. The 
United States, as a nation, is at this moment watching the 
occurrences in Washington, that are the sequel to the signifi- 
cant happening at the Presidential election last November. 

The most extraordinary thing about politicians in power 
is that they fail, utterly, to understand that extravagance and 
disregard of the public indignation are certain to evict them 
from office, with emphatic demonstrations of disapprobation. 
The present rulers of the United States — rulers in the literal 
sense of the offensive term — seemed obvious of the storm 



gathering around them until the whirlwind blew them and 
their selfish plans to the nethermost limits of repudiation. 
Yet up to the eleventh hour the Washington politicians went 
on with the utmost confidence, putting new cogs and screws 
and wheels in their gigantic political machine which was 
crushing the life out of American enterprise. 

Is history to be repeated at Sacramento as at Washing- 
ton? How can it fail to be, when the State groans under 
the load of taxes and the State Government keeps piling up 
the load till the last straw shall have been tossed on the 
quivering back of the unfortunate camel. 

In the years 1915-17 under Governor Johnson the tax- 
payers were staggered when the appropriations reached the 
unprecedented figures, $38,31 1 ,923.76. Unless every poli- 
tician in the State was put on the official salary list it did not 
appear possible that such a total of State appropriations 
could be repeated. Now what do we find. 

In the years 1917-19, under the Stephens administration, 
the total of appropriations shot up to almost forty-eight mil- 
lions. The next biennial total was nearly fifty-three millions 
— also under Stephens — the chemically pure saint rvho has 
to asf( church meetings to indorse his policies. 

But the climax is reached this year when the State Budget 
Board, with Governor Stephens' approval, has the nerve to 
propose appropriations totaling $81,378,692.51. 

Every grafter in the State must have hopes of a full 
bucket when the golden stream runs out of the leaky treasury 
after this budget receives the gubernatorial O. K. 

And the funny part of the business is that the Governor is 
going before the people for indorsement. He ought to take 
a blue Sunday off and think over the "Indorsement" the 
American people gave another highly extravagant statesman 
at the Presidential election last November. 

"Whom the gods would destroy they first make mad." 



The criminal conspiracy, which the 
The Printing Profiteers Overland Publishing Company al- 
leges against the Printers' Board of 
Trade of San Francisco, seems likely to develop into a cele- 
brated case, like that which has consigned several conspir- 
ators in New York and Chicago to prison. The arch con- 
spirator of the building trades in New York has been given 
a sentence of ten years in Sing Sing. 

It has become a risky enterprise to frame up schemes to 
rob a business rival by inspiring strikes and boycotts and 
other schemes to deprive him of patronage or the means of 
filling his orders. 

The first skirmish of the Overland Publishing Company 
with the Printers' Board of Trade, which is another name 
for the printing trust, has developed the fact that a strike 
of the typographers in the plaintiff's establishment was or- 
dered because the firm declined to join the combination of 
profiteers. 

The profiteering methods of the Printers' Board of Trade 
are similar to many trusts. Competition is eliminated. An 
arbitrary scale of prices is established, and the members of 
the trust must disclose to the secretary of the organization 
all the orders that they receive. If members attempt any 
independent action they forfeit the money which they are 
compelled to deposit when they join. 



February. 19, 1921 



Traffi 



1C 



NOT that we wish to belittle the efforts 
of Chief of Police O'Brien and Traffic 
Squad Lieutenant Sylvester, but their 
claims of sudden improvement in the regu- 
lation of auto traffic, sound like "publicity 
stuff." 

We trust that it may prove true that "since 
the middle of last January automobile acci- 
dents have decreased over 33 1-3 per cent." 
Where are the statistics, though, to support 
that claim? Perhaps they are to be had, but 
San Francisco officials, and newspapers too, 
should get over the provisional habit of 
making all kinds of unsupported assertions 
on the mere sayso of somebody who hap- 
pens to hold an office. 

In all probability the claim of a decrease 
in traffic mishaps is based on the fact that the 
force has been greatly increased. The logic 
of that argument would be that as long as 
the taxpayers pay twice as much for police 
to watch the street crossings, the number of 
killed and maimed pedestrians must be one- 
third less. It would be more satisfactory to 
the taxpayers to hear that a smaller number 
of traffic cops had imbued motorists with 
such a respect for the law that accidents 
were becoming hardly worth mention. But 
nothing of that kind is forthcoming. 

On the contrary, it is clear from the pub- 
lished police statement that the officers are 
on the wrong track. Instead of improving 
traffic service, for less outlay, they are multi- 
plying the cost without permanent improve- 
ment. As long as the traffic squad and auxil- 
iaries watch the crossings, reckless motorists 
will be kept from killing people, but as soon 
as the excessive force of cops disappear, the 
offenders will resume their old tricks and 
keep the doctors and undertakers busy as 
before. 

The police regard their traffic operations 
on the crossings as a continuous battle with 
lawless drivers. That is exactly the wrong 
point of view. It should be regarded as a 
battle between lawbreakers and the courts. 
A traffic cop has no legal power to do more 
than arrest a careless driver who kills a 
pedestrian, but the courts can punish the 
criminal so that he will have a dread of 
jail for the remainder of his life. 

If the police judges should refuse lines 
and send every culpable driver to jail for 
sixty or ninety days, with hard labor, a 
handfull of traffic cops could keep order in 
all San Francisco. 

* * * 

Why is that plan not followed? 

For two reasons. First, the police judges 
being politicians, are more anxious to make 
friends than enemies, and never send influ- 
ential offenders to jail if it be possible to 
liberate them. In the second place, police 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

Squad Becoming 

Though the Taxpayers 
Fail to See The Joke 

By Harvey Brougham 



A Jok. 



officials are always trying to magnify their 
official importance to the end that there 
may be more cops, with greater authority 
and higher salaries. 

Much as our Chief of Police and his head 
traffic officer claims for their improved plans 
of reducing accidents, we believe they can 
accomplish very little without taking the 
police court punishment into account. The 
taxpayers cannot afford to have most of 
the energies of their policemen restraining 
motorists from killing people. The offend- 
ers must be legally terrorized by the courts, 
and we have more than sufficient police 
judges to do it. Until that state of mind 
is inculcated in reckless motorists the traffic 
squad will be like the black and tans in Ire- 
land. The moment they are off guard the 
killing is resumed. 

Chief O'Brien's head traffic officer, now 
it is announced, uses a war map, like Mar- 
shal Petain or Haig at the Somme. Sitting 
before this war map and equipped with a 
gross of colored pins and a battery of tele- 
phones in touch with the "firing line," the 
head traffic cop can direct the battle of the 
Market street crossings every evening. If 
the traffic outposts at Post and Montgomery 
have been driven in and a charging squad 
of shipworkers' tin lizzies is steam-rolling 
pedestrians up Market street, the telephone 
calls for help, appraise the field marshal at 
the war map and reinforcements are sent to 
leg it madly to the weak point. So it goes. 
The marshal shouting his orders, the battery 
of telephones rattling ominously and the 
colored pins flashing to and fro over the 
map like an aurora borealis on a November 
night on the Klondyke. 

Really, it is a joke — but not for the tax- 
payers. Mack Sennetl should send up some 
of his movie stars from Los Angeles and 
make a three-reel comedy of it. 

Have our police authorities never seen a 
real big city? San Francisco isn't. Fond 
as we all are of it, 'twould be gross flat- 
tery to stack it up against New York, Lon- 
don or Paris in the matter of crowds that 
bother traffic cops. 

Stop this traffic cop propaganda in the 
newspapers and give the traffic war map as 
a premium to the Boy Scouts. Proceed to 
cut down the inflated cost of the traffic 
squad at once and make those lazzy and 
time-serving police judges get busy on jailing 
reckless motorists, or recall the whole bunch. 

The running down of pedestrians can be 



stopped very soon by jail sentences and no 
fines. Why is it that traffic cops, though 
so much exposed, are never hit by motorists ? 
They know they'd get clubbed or jailed — 
most likely both. 

The law with regard to the killing of citi- 
zens by motorists should be amended this 
Legislature so that the killer would not be 
allowed to set up a plea of contributory 
negligence. Having killed a person his pun- 
ishment would be State prison, with no power 
to escape except by executive clemency. 

This may seem a drastic law, but its 
theory is correct. A pedestrian is at the 
mercy of the motorist and 95 times in a 
100, at least, the motorist can prevent a 
fatal accident by carefulness. 

Would it not be fairer to the public to 
have five careless motorists sent to State 
prison without allowing them to set up a 
defense, than to have 95 innocent pedes- 
trians run down and left beyond all possi- 
bility of human redress? 

The impunity with which reckless motor- 
ists kill or maim plain people is a survival 
of the old feudal doctrine of the divine 
rights of kings and nobles. If on the high- 
way, a serf met with My Lord Baron, ac- 
companied by gaily bedecked knights and 
ladies, the scurvy knave on foot had to 
duck out of the way, or was ridden over. 

Words were not wasted on the varlet. If 
it should have happened that it was the 
king, and courtiers, obstructed by the base 
scullion, the royal escort handed him some- 
thing with their fists and whips as salve for 
his bruises while he lay in jail for annoying 
his betters. 

It is astonishing how long it takes human- 
ity to get those inherited traditions out of 
the system. Not everybody who rides in a 
motor car is a modernized feudal baron 
overswollen with pride in the size of his 
bank roll. Many excellent citizens are not 
conscious of any social superiority because 
they ride in equipages while thousands 
less prosperous hoof it. But those are not 
the people who cut corners at 90 miles an 
hour and have no more qualms of con- 
science about mangling a fellow being, at d 
leaving him to die on the road, than riding 
over a lame duck. The county jail and the 
State prison for such birds. 



THE CANKER IN THE ROSE 

"What reason have you got for grouching? 
Didn't you get $100 for allowing your pic- 
ture to be put in the paper as having been 
cured by Pudge Pills?" 

"Yes. I did. but hang it. my relatives are 
all asking me why I don't go to work now 
that I'm cured." — Boston Transcript. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19, 1921 



Drastic Texas Laws 



trol, but really own, the railroads. With a 
fair, incorruptible, and fearless Interstate 
Commerce Commission, the adventure would 
be worth watching. — Spectator, Portland. 



What is known as the Open Port Law, 
which was enacted by the Texas Legislature 
three months ago, went into effect on Janu- 
ary 1 . This act is said to be the most far- 
reaching step toward the free movement of 
traffic through ocean ports in time of labor 
trouble that has ever been adopted by any 
State. The union labor element regard it as 
a serious blow to their interests and are 
waging a campaign to have the law repealed. 
The law applies to railroads in that it seeks 
to protect such common carriers from inter- 
ference by tfteir employees in their regular 
operation. 

Under this measure the Governor is em- 
powered to use the State ranger force in- 
stead of the National Guard in handling a 
labor situation such as existed in Galveston 
last summer, thereby avoiding the necessity 
of declaring martial law. 

It is unlawful, under the act, for any two 
or more persons by or through the use of 
any physical violence or by threatening de- 
struction of property to interfere with or 
molest or harass any person or persons en- 
gaged in the work of loading or unloading or 
transporting any commerce, and it is unlaw- 
ful for any two or more persons to conspire 
together to prevent or attempt to prevent by 
the use of physical violence or by abusive 
language spoken or written to any person 
engaged in loading or unloading or transport- 
ing any commerce or performing the duties 
of such employment. 

Any person violating any of the provisions 
of the act shall be deemed guilty of a mis- 
demeanor and upon conviction shall be pun- 
ished by a fine of not less than $100 nor 
more than $1000, or by imprisonment in the 
county jail for a term of not less than thirty 
days nor more than one year, or by both 
fine and imprisonment; provided, however, 
should any person violating any of the pro- 
visions of the act use any physical violence 
upon or threaten the life of any person en- 
gaged in the work of loading or unloading 
or transporting any commerce, he shall be 
deemed guilty of a felony and upon convic- 
tion shall be punished by confinement in the 
State penitentiary for a term of not less than 
one year or more than five years. 

Indictment for violation of the provisions 
of the act may be returned by the grand 
jury of any county adjoining the county in 
which the territory embraced in the Gov- 
ernor's proclamation is situated. 

The Governor is authorized, under the law 
creating an industrial commission to hear 
and report on industrial controversies be- 
tween employers and employees, to appoint 
a commission of five employees, one each to 
represent the employers and laborers and 



three to represent the general public, such 
representatives to hold terms of two years 
and to serve without pay or salary. All 
hearings had by the commission shall be 
open to the public. 



WORTH TRYING 

Following the lead given by The Spectator 
some time ago, the Railway Age is advising 
the unions to save their money and buy the 
railroads. The advice of the Railway Age 
comes pat with "Thrift Week." The Spec- 
tator's suggestion was made when the rail- 
road employes' wages were increased to the 
point where it was certain the lines had to 
go into bankruptcy or get an order making 
it necessary for the public to meet the pay- 
roll. The new wage scale gave the employes 
an additional $625,000,000 a year, which, 
saved for three years and pooled, would be 
sufficient to buy control of all the lines in 
the country. 

Union ownership of the railroads would 
be belter for the unions, and the public, 
than the Plumb plan. If the unions owned 
the roads, the unions would get all the 
profits; the public would be under no other 
obligation than to pay the rates to produce a 
profit. Under the Plumb plan, the unions 
would get but half the profits, if there were 
any. If there were none, the public would 
have to stand the loss; it would also have to 
submit to whatever extortion was necessary 
to produce profits. 

The Spectator believes that the public 
would prefer union ownership, with all that 
ownership implies in the way of responsi- 
bility for wages and service and accounta- 
bility in the way of management, to the 
present union control that is wholly devoid 
of obligation to the public. Of course, some 
railroads are more or less free from union 
control; but the majority are subject to 
union dictation so arrogant and despotic as 
to leave the reputed managers with but little 
more actual power than to frame new rate 
schedules, which are rejected by the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission. 

It may be said that the unions have never 
made a success of any of the many business 
enterprises they have undertaken, and that, 
therefore, the chances are that they would 
fail as railroad owners. Quite so. But 
they would gain experience. And during the 
time they were acquiring this experience by 
owning the roads and bankrupting them- 
selves, the public would be happily freed 
from the constant menace of a nation-wide 
paralyzation of the wheels of commerce, as 
the unions would hardly strike against them- 
selves. Or would they? Well, anyway, we 
should like to see the unions not only con- 



THE CASE OF JUDGE LANDIS 

His acceptance of the position of supreme 
commissioner of baseball obviously cannot 
have appeared of questionable propriety to 
United States District Judge Landis. If he 
had harbored any real doubts in the matter 
he could hardly have consented to receive 
remuneration, amounting to over $50,000 a 
year in salary and allowance, for outside 
services while holding a seat on the Federal 
bench. In passing judgment on his own 
conduct, there were very potent reasons why 
he should not take a disinterested view. 

Still, the objections that Judge Landis was 
so ready to overrule in his own favor have 
been raised again by Representative Welty, 
who calls for a Congressional investigation. 
It is an extraordinary situation for a high 
officer of justice, bound in duty and honor 
to keep himself above reproach, and that he 
has incurred severe criticism is not due either 
to accident or ignorance. 

The traditions of the bench are rigid in 
prohibiting a judge from holding profitable 
connections with outside interests. They do 
not permit him to serve two masters. They 
do not leave it to him to say at his pleasure 
where he may overstep the line. If he is per- 
suaded by the advantages of taking financial 
compensation for work not according with 
his obligations as a judge it is always his 
privilege to resign. 

The indiscretion of the course he has 
adopted should by this time be plain to Judge 
Landis. He may assume in self-defense that 
there is nothing equivocal in his accepting 
two salaries or in sticking to the bench and 
acting as chief arbitrator for organized base- 
ball. But the shortest way of setting him- 
self right with the public he is evidently dis- 
inclined to take. — New York World. 



WANTED 

Oriental Rugs, Antique 
and Modern Furniture, 
Art Goods, Silver and 
Sheffield Plate, Paint- 
ings, Prints, Books, 
Etc., Etc. 

H. TAYLOR CURTIS CO. 

855 Mission Street 
Telephone Kearny 2332 



February. 19, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



LITERARY GEMS ARE RARE 

"Why do we read the magazines) The 
confession will be in 95 per cent of cases: 
for the short stories," writes J. A. Anderson 
in the Boston Transcript. 

"With me it has not been short stories in 
general but always the short story. I 
hardly ever find more than one such story — 
a really superior story — in any single issue 
of any magazine. Yet one of this kind re- 
pays, and many times repays, for reading 
the others. The whole thing is a quest. If 
I find the story I am, of course, delighted; 
if not, I am surely not disappointed. 

"I try again — read the fiction in the few 
of our first class magazines for that month, 
and if I find nothing there with a strong, 
broad appeal, what is there to do but wait 
for another month and make a fresh quest? 
It is endless, but it makes for the pleasure 
and the delight of the thing; this looking, 
generally in vain, but once or twice, perhaps 
half a dozen times in a year, actually find- 
ing, what may be described as a very model 
of short fiction. 

"Can there be any doubt that the editors 
of the better magazines are doing their best 
and giving to all writers of promise who 
come under their notice a full measure of 
encouragement? Editors can publish no 
better stories than come to them. True, 
worthy stories by unknown writers may for 
a time go begging, but authors today who 
produce real stories do not for long have 
their light hid under a bushel." 



OUR LANGUAGE 

Here are a few of the difficulties of the 
English language: 

A flock of ships is called a fleet. 

A fleet of sheep is called a flock. 

A flock of girls is called a bevy. 

A bevy of wolves is called a pack. 

A pack of thieves is called a gang. 

A gang of angels is called a host. 

A host of porpoise is called a shoal. 

A shoal of buffaloes is called a herd. 

A herd of children is called a troop. 

A troop of partridges is called a covey. 

A covey of beauties is called a galaxy. 

A galaxy of ruffians is called a horde. 

A horde of rubbish is called a heap. 

A heap of oxen is called a drove. 

A drove of blackguards is called a mob. 

A mob of whales is called a school. 

A school of worshipers is called a congre- 
gation. — Pittsburg Chronicle-Telegraph. 



KEPT IN PARIS 

Governor Channing Cox of Massachusetts, 
discussing the high cost of living in France, 
said the other day: 

"In Paris, you know, a good pair of shoes 
fetches $50, and a good meal about as much. 

"Well, a young lawyer started on a brief 
trip to Paris in June, and he long overstayed 
his time. On his return in late September, 
a friend, who knew he was none too flush, 
said to him : 

"Why did you remain so long in Paris, 
Jim?" 

" 'My friends kept me there,' Jim an- 
swered. 

"Your friends? Why, Jim, I didn't 
know you have any friends in Paris.' 

" 'I haven't. My friends are all in Osh- 
kosh, and they refused to send me any 
money.' " — Detroit Free Press. 



HIGHEST DIVORCE RATE 

Japan leads the world in proportion of 
divorces to marriages. Unofficial reports say 
the divorces in 1918 numbered 56,741, and 
the marriages 503,236, a ratio of 1 12.8 di- 
vorces to each 1000 marriages. 



The Elkora mine, from Elko, reports say 
had an output in December of over $174.- 
000. This property is owned by the Guggen- 
heims and is said to be the largest gold pro- 
ducer in Nevada. 



"What do you suppose has come over my 
husband this morning, Sophia?" exclaimed a 
conscientious little bride to the new servant. 
"I never saw him start downtown so happy. 
He's whistling like a bird." 

"I'm to blame, mum; I got the packages 
mixed this morning, and instead of giving 
him oatmeal, I cooked the bird seed." — Dis- 
ston Crucible. 



Marcia — I heard that you were engaged 
to a shimmy dancer. 

Montague — I was. but she shook me. 



-m 



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PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 

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m- 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19, 1921 



Pacific Auto Exhibits 



EVERYTHING gives promise of com- 
plete success for the Fifth Pacific 
Automobile Exposition which will open 
this Saturday evening at the Civic Audito- 
rium. 

The main section of the auditorium, the 
foyers and side rooms are given over to the 
display of fifty-eight makes of standard cars. 
Whether one's motor taste runs to touring 
cars, roadsters custom or standard limou- 
sines with luxurious fittings, or dashing speed- 
sters, there are cars to suit every taste and 
purse. 

The basement show rooms are given over 
to the exhibits of the commercial cars, so- 
called. There are found trucks of every 
description and tonnage; tractors, trailers, 
and a host of appliances used in transporta- 
tion and industrial pursuits. Factory experts 
will be in attendance everywhere, ready to 
explain the possibilities of their wares in 
actual business use. 

In the balcony over 900 individual exhibits 
of crafts allied to the auto industry are on 
display, with a profusion that will quicken 
the pulse of the most blase motorist. New 
spark plugs, lubricants, brake linings, rear 
seat windshields, hydraulic control systems, 
anti-thief devices and hundred of other de- 
vices and appliances designed to give aid 
and comfort to the auto owner are displayed 
and explained to the visitor. 

And over all stretches the roof of a mam- 
moth Grecian temple, greater in all its dimen- 
sions than the famed Pantheon. A circular 
colonnade of thirty-two enormous classical 
columns, surmounted by bronze trusses and a 
moonlit canopy, forms the huge temple, and 
the fact that this tremendous structure has 
been set within the auditorium itself gives a 
striking demonstration of the tremendousness 
of the city's own show house. 

Beyond the confines of the temple stretch 
the panoramas of California's "out-of-doors" 
that adds the final fairyland touch to the ex- 
hibit. 

The Pacific Auto Show, which is recog- 
nized throughout the country as one of the 
three motor shows of national importance, is 
held under the sanction of the Motor Car 
Dealers' Association of San Francisco. Thi 
year's show is under the direction of George 
A. Wahlgreen, veteran industrial showman, 
who has managed the affair since its organ- 
ization five years ago. The executive com- 
mittee for the dealers in charge of the show 
consists of William L. Hughson, chairman; 
E. S. Jones, J. A. Murphy, M. D. Stewart 
and R. F. Thompson. Officers of the deal- 
ers' association who aided the executive com- 
mittee in the show arrangements, include T. 
A. Skinner, president; Roy B. Alexander, 



vice-president; H. B. Slocum, secretary; E. 
W. Milburn, treasurer, and A. F. Lemberger, 
general manager. 

While a program for visiting automobile 
men has been arranged to keep them inter- 
ested every day next week and up to the close 
of the show next Saturday night, Wednesday 
will be the red letter day on the calendar. 

On that day the "Chronicle's" unique con- 
test to determine the most expert woman mo- 
torist in California will be staged in con- 
junction with the show, and several hundred 
fair drivers will exhibit their knowledge of 
"rules of the road," operating mechanism 
and driving. 

Wednesday evening the "jinks" banquet 
will be held at the Fairmont Hotel and 500 
automobile men of the Pacific Coast and 
visiting factory heads and representatives 
will cast business aside to play for a night. 
The humorous side of the industry will be 
treated in an elaborate program of song and 
jest. William L. Hughson, Ford distributor 
for the Pacific Coast, and recently elected 
vice-president of the National Automobile 
Association and the "Old Timers' Club," 
composed of veterans of the industry, will 
preside. 



IN THE DEVIL'S CAULDON 

Four preachers and the Secretary of the 
Y. M. C. A. of Elizabeth, N. J., having dug 
up a Sunday closing blue law against jazz 
on the Sabbath, when all prancing toes 
should be pointed across church thresholds, 
the mayor of the town, D. Victor Mravleg, is 
having heated sessions with the Soul Shep- 
herds, who call his burg "The Devil's Caul- 
dron." They have told him that if the Sa- 
hara Desert played a one-day stand in Eliza- 
beth it would wake up next day soggy 
enough to swim home in its own waves. 

The mayor admitted the prevalence of 
drinks in his town, but if there were no sin- 
ners there would be no room for churches, 
he argued. 

The Shepherds of Kingdom Come said he 
was arguing around in a circle and getting 
nowhere. His town needed proper Sunday 
recreation, such as sermons, open libraries 
and sacred concerts. A real blue Sunday 
would purify the moral atmosphere. 

"We'd better begin by enlarging the jail," 
protested the worldly mayor, and relations 
between the Saints and Sinners in Elizabeth 
are somewhat strained. 

Meantime the bootleggers get all the prof- 
its, and the U. S. Government none of the 
much-needed tax on booze, which is the 
financial side of this tug-of-war between Pur- 
itanism and Belzebub. 



FRENCH MARSHALS' SALARIES 

The raise of pay for French officers still 
leaves them with small salaries as measured 
by the American standard. 

The three marshals — Joffre, Foch and Pe- 
tain, receive yearly in pay and allowances 
slightly less than $8,000 in total, with about 
$400 added if the recipients are married. 
This reckons the franc at the normal value 
of nearly 20 cents, although it is now quoted 
at less than six cents. It means that the 
yearly earnings of the three men whose efforts 
saved France do not exceed $2,700 each, 
on a normal money basis, and that in the 
New York market, for instance, their income 
just now amounts to about $900 each. 

Apply the normal scale to the payment 
of other army officers, the pay of a General 
of Division is $1,820; of a Brigadier, 
$1,530; of a Colonel, $1,226; of a Lieuten- 
ant Colonel, $1,112; of a Major, $980 to 
$1,000; of a Captain, $700 to $850; of a 
First Lieutenant, $546 to $660, and of a 
Second Lieutenant from $467 to $500. So 
American clerks may feel themselves in re- 
ceipt of really big incomes as contrasted with 
the revised and advanced French army 
schedule. 



Subscribe for the News Letter. Read by 
all taxpayers and business men. 



USE 

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Associated Oil Company 

Sharon Bldg. San Francisco 



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Berkeley Store 233 1 Telegraph 



February, 19, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Misleading The Masses 



THE quality of propaganda America was 
fed up on during the great war, is now 
being understood when English writers 
are replying to the attack of Professor Otto 
Franke on Lord Northcliffe, designated by 
the angry German as "The greatest scoundrel 
the world ever produced." 

It is admitted on both sides of the contro- 
versy that Germany and England vied in the 
publication of stuff calculated to inflame the 
world, without worrying much over its verac- 
ity. England appeared to hold her own very 
well in the propagandist field against Ger- 
many until Lloyd George begged Northcliffe 
to reinforce the anti-German batteries, 
whereupon the Kaiser's army of newspaper 
liars was practically wiped off the map. His- 
tory is silent as to which of Northcliffe's 
novelists concocted the yarn about the Ger- 
mans boiling down the dead for their fat, 
but the Manchester Guardian admits that it 
was a fair to middling specimen of the stuff 
English-speaking peoples were fed up on. 

In America we have still a great deal to 
learn of the noble art of war, and particu- 
larly that part where the antagonists are 
"sicked" at one another like fighting bulldogs 
till they clash and the gamblers put their 
money on the maddened beasts. 

Hearst is claiming in his newspapers that 
dishonest newspaper reports imperil civiliza- 
tion. While Hearst can hardly be classified 
as the worthiest champion of civilization, he 
is right in ascribing great public danger to 
newspaper propaganda, intended to blind the 
nations, and especially the United States. 
The appended extracts from Heart's fulmina- 
tions against some of his untruthful con- 
temporaries follow: 

"Instead of being victorious the Greek 
army is defeated and can only be rescued 
from surrender by the most expeditious use 
of British and French naval vessels to carry 
the dispirited soldiers of Venizelos back to 
Greece. 

"Instead of the French victoriously menac- 
ing Anatolia from French strongholds in 
Syria the French troops will either have to 
be precipitately withdrawn or supplied with 
naval and military reinforcements, the enor- 
mous cost of which would hardly be toler- 
ated by the French people. 

"Instead of the British victoriously and 
firmly holding Constantinople we now hear 
oHici.il British admissions that the situation 
in Constantinople is desperate. 

"How important it is, therefore, that our 
people should know fully the facts and the 
lessons of the tremendous events which are 
occurring in other parts of the world. 

"How dangerous it is that a conspiracy 
of England and France and other European 



nations should not only keep true informa- 
tion from the American people, but should 
impose upon the American people every con- 
ceivable form of false information. 

A new President is soon to occupy the 
White House. This new President has been 
placed in the White House, this new Congress 
has been delegated to Washington, by the 
most emphatic expression of their will which 
the American people have ever made. Both 
the new President and the new Congress are 
where they are because it is the will and the 
determination of the American people that 
foreign governments shall no longer exercise 
over us the power of censorship; shall no 
longer exercise the power falsely to inform 
or to deceive the American people; that 
henceforth the channels of communication 
and commerce .and travel between our Amer- 
ica and every other country and territory on 
the globe shall be at our free disposal, and 
subject only to our own sovereign will and 



FORGOTTEN HISTORY 

How quickly political celebrities and the 
sensations they cause, fade from public 
memory after they cease to figure in the 
newspapers! 

Thirty years ago Charles Stewart Pamell, 
whose widow died the other day, was the 
"uncrowned king of Ireland," and his agita- 
tion for Irish Home Rule was as much a 
problem to the English Parliament as the 
present Sinn Fein reprisals. 

In 1890 when Parnell was at the height 
of his political power, and all of Catholic 
Ireland was arrayed behind him. the solidar- 
ity of his party was shattered, as if by a 
thunderbolt from a clear sky. The news- 
paper announcement that appeared in print. 
that the famous Irish leader had been made 
co-respondent by one Captain O'Shea, an 
Irish politician who was suing his wife for 
divorce. The burning of Cork the other day 
could not have caused a greater stir in Ire- 
land than did the news of Parnell's entangle- 
ment with the sprightly wife of one of his 
political lieutenants. Parnell was not mar- 
ried nor known as a gallant. He was a 
rather austere man. not young and appar- 
ently too much engrossed in politics to have 
time for flirtatious adventures. 

He had fallen a victim to the charms of 
the sprightly Mrs. O'Shea, however, and the 
scandal ended his public career and changed 
the whole course of the Irish national move- 
ment. 

The divorce suit of Captain O'Shea was 
not defended. The aggrieved soldier obtained 
a divorce and Parnell married the divorcee. 
That, of course, ended his leadership of an 



Irish party, directed and inspired by the 
Catholic clergymen and bishops. Parnell 
himself was a Protestant, but that was not 
unusual in Irish national movements. 
Several famous leaders had been Protestants. 

The leader did not long survive his dis- 
grace. His wife, it was said, had been a 
fond companion, and Parnell, who had an 
income from his Irish property, left her in 
fairly comfortable circumstances, but it is 
stated that before her death poverty over- 
took her. The newspapers devoted but little 
space to the passing of the woman who had 
once been so much talked of on both sides 
of the Atlantic. She had almost .passed out 
of the memory of her own generation. 

The fall of Parnell is considered by many 
political observers to have hastened the pres- 
ent Sinn Fein movement for an Irish repub- 
lic. Parnell wanted home rule, and particu- 
larly betterment of the tenant farmers of Ire- 
land who were sorely oppressed by absentee 
landlords. When he lost the leadership, the 
more radical element in Ireland who favored 
direct action became stronger. The tenant 
farmers having had their conditions im- 
proved, were desirous of quiting further agi- 
tation but the radicals soon drove them back 
into the political field, and out of the Land 
League project has grown a widespread na- 
tional movement, composed of all classes of 
wage earners and many professional people 
who took little part in the farmer movement. 

Parnell changed the Irish religious strife 
into a useful and needed agitation for the 
betterment of the farmers, and the Sinn Fein 
has transformed that agrarian movement into 
a widespread revolution for national inde- 
pendence. 



ENERGETIC AND RELIABLE 

Myron Crawford Hall, who is so well 
known in the advertising world, has joined 
the Harry Elliott advertising service, which 
has made such an excellent record. 



PYR0-V01D 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 
- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

908 Market Street, at Powell 

San Franciaco 

Dcpt. N. L. Eatakbaed 1903 

SAVE VOIR TEETH 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19, 1921 



In The World of Commerce 



THE JANUARY decline in prices is an in- 
dication of the fact that we are gradually 
approaching a better financial equilibrium. 
January showed less of a general decline 
than many months past. There is a very 
general feeling of optimism and capital is 
emerging from the hole into which it went 
in hiding about last November. A very 
widespread mo ement in wage reduction is 
taking place and liquidation is had in that 
direction eithe by a general cutting of wage 
or by a discharge of help that corporations 
may well do without. In some instances, in 
the case of those who have a very large list 
of employes, arrangements have been made 
whereby the wage remains the same but the 
employees are working in shifts, so as to give 
every one a chance and avoid throwing peo- 
ple out of a gainful operation while the 
re-adjustment process takes place. In other 
instances, employers have used very little 
judgment and have discharged right and left, 
apparently without rhyme or reason. This 
shows itself in lack of efficiency in handling 
business. Some of these firms are re-hiring 
the employees that were "fired" a month 
ago. It would be a fine thing for such em- 
ployers if they took a practical course in 
the cost of "hiring and firing," which is by 
no means a small item to add to the over- 
head of a business, which is run on legiti- 
mate profits. 

Abroad, prices are falling steadily and this 
is notably true in England and France. While 
metals have not fallen appreciably in this 
country, in England there is the beginning 
of a sharp decline. Textiles are steadily on 
the downgrade. Commodity prices in Great 
Britain are 33 per cent lower than last 
March. While textiles are dropping there is 
a very good trade going on. In this country 
the cut in prices wholesale is having an effect 
on the buying but the resumption of normal 
active trade is not yet come. The "buyers' 
strike" in this country is waning. There is 
a period beyond which the general public 
cannot refrain from re-appearing in the mar- 
ket. In the lumber business, the mills and 
wholesalers have dropped their prices mate- 
rially with a view to stimulating business and 
if the other crafts purveying to the housing 
of the people would only follow suit, there 
would soon be a building boom on from one 
end of the country to the other. In order 
to do this, however, there must be a liquida- 
tion by labor of its wage and the prices of 
metal products must come down. There has 
been no appreciable fall in metal products. 

Money is a little easier at the banks and 
there is generally a greater degree of con- 
fidence being displayed. 



INSURANCE — There were some very not- 
able men at the meeting of the Fire Under- 
writers' Association of the Pacific and the 
attendance was a large and enthusiastic one. 
J. B. Levison of the Firemen's Fund; John 
F. Stafford of the Sun of London; Rolla V. 
Watt, manager of the Royal; Frank L. Eme- 
rick, the retiring president, and L. H. Earl, 
president-elect, Franklin H. Wentworth, sec- 
retary of the National Fire Protection As- 
sociation; W. H. Merrill, president of the 
Underwriters' Laboratories, and others, 
graced the occasion with their presence. A 
meeting of this character does a world of 
good and if nothing else tends to give a co- 
hesiveness and pride of profession to those 
who are engaged in the insurance business. 

Edwin Parrish, of the Niagara Fire, has 
had the pleasure of a visit from President 0. 
E. Lane. Mr. Lane is well known on the 
Coast. 



SHIPPING — Business is slowly improving 
in shipping lines. There has been a slight 
improvement in the export and import trade 
and passenger traffic continues good. Ship- 
ping men are looking forward to an early 
reduction of wages of all of those who go to 
make the complement of manning a ship. 
Announcements have been made to that ef- 
fect and there is an agreement by which 
proposed reductions will be offered to the 
men for their acceptance. In many instances 
these proposals have been meet with a flat 
rejection by the unions to whom they have 
been submitted; the proposition was to en- 
tirely eliminate over-time pay and to revise 
wages downwards. The unions have, how- 
ever, in most instances where a reply has 
been received by the Shipping Board and 
the shipowners, left the door open for further 
discussion. The men are basing their oppo- 
sition to the reduction in wages on a state- 
ment of Admiral Benson, which they quote, 
and in which he says that wage reduction is 
a subject of minor consideration, but thai 
the major cost is in the big item of fuel and 
repairs. The Masters, Mates and Pilots As- 
sociation at New York has not yet made any 
reply to the Shipping Board and shipowners. 
There is a referendum reported on the way. 
The Shipping Board has 375 ships laid up 
and the news comes from headquarters that 
if the depression does not show signs of stop- 
100 more ships will lie up. 



MINING — Last week showed no salient 
features in the condition of the mining in- 
dustries. Mine operators were marking time, 
except where the weather conditions allowed 
work to go on. Everybody is looking for a 



very active season, as soon as things thaw 
out. The mining stock market was irregular 
with a tendency to dullness, reflecting in a 
large measure the quiet imposed by the 
weather on those who are operating. Gold 
miners are much interested in the plan, advo- 
cated by the American Mining Congress, for 
a gold subsidy. National aid is expected for 
gold mining. Some time ago the American 
Bankers' Association went on record as op- 
posed to the idea. Gold production has mate- 
rially declined in this country. This is mainly 
due to the fact that the price of gold is held 
constant while the cost of producing it has 
very materially increased. The industry will 
remain embarrassed until such time as the 
general price liquidation, now going on in 
the country, has reached a normal level. It 
will then be time enough to inquire if na- 
tional aid is necessary. A great many indus- 
tries are claiming national aid, some by way 
of a tariff and others through other means. 
Aid giving might well become a most repre- 
hensible thing, but as regards gold mining 
it must always be borne in mind that the 
position of the gold producer is materially 
different from that of all of those engaged 
in other industries and that, if giving of na- 
tional aid is at all to be indulged in, the 
gold mining industry should have the first 
call. 



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AND 



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February. 19, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



Allied Debt To America 



NEW YORK bankers indorse the refusal 
of the Washington authorities to cancel 
the inter-allied war debt, declares S. 
S. Fontaine, a prominent metropolitan writer 
on finance. 

The few exceptions, Fontaine says, are 
some bankers who have a pecuniary interest 
in cultivating the good will of foreign ex- 
chequers that may have some very attractive 
financial propositions to float in this coun- 
try during the next year or two. 

The burden of the proposed cancellation 
would fall on the backs of American tax- 
payers who are already carrying too heavy 
a load, caused by Government extravagance 
and the loss of revenue from prohibition. 

Metropolitan bankers declare that when 
Austen Chamberlain, the British Chancellor 
of the Exchequer, declared at Birmingham 
that, in proposing all the allied nations re- 
mit their debts to each other, his govern- 
ment sought no national advantage for them- 
selves, he overlooked the fact that the 
United States in the end was the greatest 
of all creditors and gained the least in a 
material way from the war. 

It will not receive a cent of the indemnity 
which is to be collected from Germany. 

Not only has Great Britain possession of 
the German colonies, but the defeat of Ger- 
many has driven from the seas ' the mosl 
dreaded rival of British supremacy and left 
British ship owners in a position where they 
can command for some time to come the 
greater part of German export tonnage. 
Thus advantage will neutralize, as far as 
British trade is concerned, to a very great 
extent the proposed 1 2Vl per cent tax on 
exports, which the allies seek to impose on 
Germany, and the greatest burden of which 
the United States itself will bear. 

Memorandums embodying these opinions 
have been placed in the hands of President- 
elect Harding and, it is said, will receive his 
very earnest attention immediately after in- 
auguration. It is believed that the policy 
of the Government will be not only to re- 
main firm in its refusal to remit the debt, 
but to insist that within a reasonable time 
the obligation be funded in such shape as 
to become not only a tangible liability, but 
a negotiable security. At present it is merely 
in the form of notes signed by the Ambas- 
sadors of the various powers and deposited 
in the Treasury and upon which no interest 
has ever been collected. 

The suggestion has been made to Mr. 
Harding that the allied debtors be requested 
to issue long-term bonds in lieu of these 
Ambassadors' receipts, whose maturities will 
conform to some of the longer-term issues of 
Liberty bonds. 



These foreign bonds, bearing the indorse- 
ment of the United States Government and 
carrying an interest rate somewhat higher 
than those of our own Government bonds, 
might be sufficiently attractive to make pos- 
sible some basis of exchange for outstanding 
Libertys, which could thereupon be retired, 
thus shifting the interest charges from the 
shoulders of our own taxpayers to those of 
our foreign friends. 

Another suggestion has been made re- 
cently that the allies liquidate their debt to 
us by means of a corresponding amount of 
indemnity bonds received from Germany. 
Bankers, however, will urge the administra- 
tion at Washington not to consider this pro- 
posal unless our allied debtors agree to place 
their own indorsement on these bonds both 
as to principal and interest. 



DIFFERENTIATING FREEDOM 

Discussing present conditions in America, 
Professor Charles A. Beard, said in the New 
York World of January 16: 

"Our passion for personal liberty has not 
made us free all along the line. We have 
one kind of freedom in America. Statistics 
show that American criminals have more 
freedom to commit crime than do the crim- 
inals of any equally advanced country. 
However, the pressure of public opinion in 
the matter of personal morals is greater here 
than in other countries; and the minute that 
public opinion becomes crystallized in 
America, there is an immediate effort to in- 
corporate it into law. 

"It is easier to commit robbery here than 
it is in England, but we must admit that it 
is more difficult to get a drink. It is easier 
to murder a competitor in business here than 
it ever was in France or Germany, but it is 
much more difficult to attend a theatre on 
Sunday. It is easier to avoid the police here 
than it has been in Europe, but it is far 
more difficult to escape the Comstocks. It 
seems relatively easy to throw bombs at mid- 
day in our financial centers, but Mr. Debs 
has learned that it is very difficult indeed to 
defy public opinion or to criticize the actions 
of our Government." 



RAY BENJAMIN IN SAM SHORTRIDGES 
OFFICES 

Senator Samuel M. Shortridge has gone to- 
Washington to prepare for his senatorial 
duties, but his office suite in the Chronicle 
Building is not vacant. Raymond Benjamin 
has moved into it. from his offices in the 
Mills Building. Attorney Cornelius Kelly, 
who was an office associate of Mr. Benjamin, 
is also located with him in his new quarters 
in the Chronicle Building. 



Samuel M. Shortridge, Jr., retains a desk 
in his distinguished father's former offices to 
continue his law studies. The private library 
of Senator Shortridge is considered to be one 
of the best-selected in the State, as the 
owner is a diligent reader of fine literature 
as well as of legal tomes. 

Ray Benjamin has his hands full these 
days, for not only is he a successful lawyer 
in active practice, but is assistant to National 
Chairman Will H. Hays. 



OF LITTLE USE 

Not long ago a number of masons left 
Scotland to settle in this country. One of 
them wrote to his wife shortly after his ar- 
rival, and instructed her to sell their house- 
hold property and to take passage out to 
him. 

The good wife had a neighbor who came 
to help her with the packing. In the midst 
of it they fell upon Thomas' watch. The 
neighbor examined it closely and then said: 

"It's a grand watch, Catherine. Ye'll be 
takin' it wi' ye?" 

"Na, na!" was the reply. "It wad be 
o' nae use oot there, for Thomas tells me 
in his letter that there is some 'oors o' dif- 
ference between the time here and in Cali- 
fornia, so I needna be takin' useless things. 
— Harper's Magazine. 



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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19. 1921 




— The engagement is announced of Mrs. 
Helen Ewell Bull of San Francisco and Mr. 
Harold Reynolds of New York. The wed- 
ding will take place in May in British Guiana, 
South America, where Mr. Reynolds is in 
business. Ms. Bull's mother. Mrs. Samuel 
Ewell of Marysville, will go with her to 
South Ameiica for the wedding. Mrs. Bull 
was a Marysville girl, the daughter of one 
of the pioneer residents there. She was mar- 
ried to the late Mr. Bull four years ago and 
his death occurred two years ago. Since 
then Mrs. Bull has lived in town with her 
mother-in-law, Mrs. Jessie Bull. Mr. Rey- 
nolds comes from a well known New York 
family and has been in business for several 
years in South America. He is a second 
cousin of the late Mr. Bull. 

—Mr. Charles W. Clark will return to San 
Francisco from New Orleans in a few days 
in his private car. He went South for the 
races and entered some of his horses. Mr. 
Clark took a party of friends on the trip. 
They were Dr. Max Rothschild, Mr. Gordon 
and Mr. Raymond Armsby. Mr. Walter Filer, 
Colonel Sydney Cloman and Mr. Walter Van 
Pelt of Los Angeles. Colonel Cloman re- 
turned to his home in Burlingame a few days 
ago. Mr. Gordon and Mr. Raymond Armsby 
left the party at New Orleans and have gone 
to New York for a several weeks' stay. 

— The marriage of Miss Marian Leigh 
Mailliard and Dr. Walter I. Baldwin will take 
place on March 28. It will be the first wed- 
ding after Easter, and will be an interesting 
society event. The ceremony will be per- 
formed at St. Luke's Church and there will 
be a number of attendants. Mrs. Howard 
Naffziger will give a tea on February 24 for 
Miss Mailliard, who is Mrs. Naffziger's sister- 
in-law, a bride of several months ago. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Earnest Folger and their 
daughters, Misses Betty and Elena Folger, 
will leave for New York and Europe in the 
spring. They will sail from New York May 
21 and will spend four months traveling 
abroad. After that, it is probable they will 
remain in Paris for another few months be- 
fore returning to San Francisco. 

— Mrs. George Newhall is ill at Adler's 
Sanitarium and her friends are sending flow- 
ers and messages of sympathy. She came 
from her Burlingame home a few days ago 
to enter the hospital. 

— Complimentary to Mrs. Grant De Remer, 
who leaves for the East this week, Mrs. Alan 
Cline entertained at a prettily appointed tea 
Monday afternoon at her home in Broderick 
street. 



— Mrs. Arthur Lord gave an informal 
luncheon Monday at the St. Francis at which 
she entertained Mesdames Georges de La- 
tour, Mountford S. Wilson, Henry T. Scott 
and the Misses Maude and Tiny O'Connor 
and Miss Jennie Blair, who has returned re- 
cently from New York. 

— Mrs. Joseph M. Masten and her daugh- 
ters, Mrs. J. Rupert Mason and Miss (Cath- 
erine Masten, and Mrs. P. F. Dunne and Miss 
Marjory and Miss Marian Dunne will leave 
for New York and Washington on Sunday. 
Before returning to California they will spend 
some time in Canada. 

— Mrs. James Moffitt of Piedmont cele- 
brated her eighty-fifth birthday last Tuesday 
and was congratulated by friends of both 
sides of the bay. She is one of the most 
interesting women of California and is the 
mother of Dr. Herbert Moffitt of San Fran- 
cisco, Mr. James K. Moffitt of Oakland and 
Mrs. J. Hampton Lynch of New York. 

— Miss Marie Louise Winslow, who will 
become the bride of Sydney Van Wych 
Peters, April 9, was the guest of honor at a 
Valentine luncheon at which Mrs. Harry 
Washington Dodge entertained Tuesday aft- 
ernoon. The affair was held in the Fairmont 
Hotel, where covers were placed for eighteen. 

— Miss Lucretia McNear will have a pic- 
turesque bridal group on the occasion of her 
marriage to William Hill Thomas on Febru- 
ary 22. Instead of the usual bridal attend- 
ants, Miss McNear will have twelve or more 
of her sorority sisters from her class at the 
University of California to accompany her 
to and from the altar. Dr. Lynn T. White 
will read the ceremony. 

— Mrs. Charles Farquharson will leave for 
the East in a few weeks. She is going to be 
in New York to be present at the marriage of 
her niece, Miss Evelyn Cunningham, and Mr. 
Seward Simons, and expects to go abroad 
before returning to San Francisco. She will 
visit her sister, Mrs. Cunningham, and Colo- 
nel Cunningham in England. 

— Mrs. Milo Robbins gave a bridge party 
and tea Friday afternoon at her home in 
Jackson street for Mrs. David Goodale, a 
bride from Philadelphia, and for Mrs. Grant 
De Remer, who is going East. 

— Miss Cora Jane Flood has returned to 
her home at the Fairmont Hotel after an ab- 
sence of several months in New York. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Bode K. Smith are re- 
ceiving the congratulations of their friends 
on the birth of a daughter. 



— Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Short were dinner 
hosts Tuesday evening at their home in this 
city where they entertained a group of close 
friends who later went to a theatre party. 

— Mr. and Mrs. J. Leroy Nickel left last 
Thursday on a several weeks' motor trip 
through the State. They will visit their dif- 
ferent ranches and en route home will spend 
a few days at resorts in the southland. 

— Mrs. Henry F. Allen gave a large dance 
Friday evening for her granddaughter, Miss 
Alysse Allen, who made her debut this 
season. It was the largest affair of the 
debutante set this season and about 150 
young people were there. Mrs. Allen, her 
daughter-in-law, Mrs. Wyatt Allen, and Miss 
Allen received in the jinks room of the club, 
and dancing took place there. 

— Miss Helen Boyd gave a pretty luncheon 
at the home of her sister, Mrs. William 
Payne, on Wednesday. The table was dec- 
orated with spring fiowers. The guests were 
Miss Barbara Kemble, Miss Janice Ever, Miss 
Vera Boyd, Miss Gladys Little. Miss Eliza- 
beth Watt, Miss Doris Wirtner, Miss Marian 
Wirtner, Miss Kathryn Boyd, Miss Elizabeth 
Parcells, Mrs. Harry Warren and Mrs. 
William Payne. 

— Mrs. Edward G. Schmiedell gave a 
bridge party and tea Friday afternoon 
at the Warrington Apartments, where the 
Schmiedell family is passing the winter. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Prentis C. Hale left Fri- 
day morning for New York. They sailed on 
February 1 1 for Naples, and will travel in 
Europe for the next four or five months. 

Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



Tel. Market 'J915 



Established 1865 



San Francisco Plating Works 

Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper and Brass Plating 

Work of every description plated 

Silver Plated Copper Mining Plates for Saving Gold 

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When You Shop 

Buy wisely, but conservatively, 
but not extravagantly. What 
you need, buy now. Work in 
the factories depends upon the 
amount of purchasing done by 
the public. But extravagant 
buying means inflation of the 
prices and an open door for 
the profiteer. 

W Ward's 

Women 's and Misses' Apparel 

Geary Street 

Between Grant and Stockton 











February, 19, 1921 

— The marriage of Miss Evelyn Cunning- 
ham and Mr. Seward C. Simons will take 
place in this country the middle of April, and 
Colonel and Mrs. Cunningham will come 
from their home in England with their 
daughter for the event. The wedding will 
take place in the East and the bride and 
bridegroom will come to San Francisco to 
live. Miss Cunningham spent last winter 
here with her aunt, Mrs. Charles Farquhar- 
son, and made many friends here. 

—Miss Marie Louise Winslow will become 
the bride of Mr. Sidney Van Wyck Peters, 
of Portland, on April 9 at St. Luke's church. 
It will be an elaborate wedding, with a num- 
ber of attendants. Mrs. Algernon Gibson 
will be her sister's matron of honor, and 
there will be six or eight bridesmaids and 
ushers. Miss Winslow returned a few days 
ago from Portland, where she was enter- 
tained by many of her fiance's friends. 

— Mrs. A. P. Whittell has arrived from 
England for a visit of several weeks to her 
relatives, Mr. and Mrs. George Whittell, at 
the California street home. Her daughter. 
Mrs. Kirk Albert, and Mr. Albert, are living 
in England, after a long residence in Switzer- 
land. Mrs. Albert was in San Francisco for 
several months last year. 

— Mrs. Richard Rees gave a children's 
party Monday to celebrate the fourth birth- 
day anniversary of her son, Richard. It was 
a delightful affair with about fifteen children 
there. Among them were the daughter and 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Fagan, Mr. and 
Mrs. Eyre Pinckard's children, Mr. and Mrs. 
Loring Pickering's little son, and the sons of 
Mr. and Mrs. George Bowles, Mr. and Mrs 
Roy Somers, Mr. and Mrs. Warren Spieker 
and Mr. and Mrs. William Roth. 

— Mrs. Arthur Lord entertained at an in- 
formal luncheon Friday at the St. Francis 
the members of a bridge club. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Welch enter- 
tained informally at luncheon Sunday at 
Burlingame, where they are spending the 
winter. Their guests included Mr. and Mrs. 
George Pope, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Foster 
Dutton. Col. Thornwell Mullally and Mr. 
Francis Carolan. 

— Mrs. Kenneth MacRae was hostess at 
luncheon Monday in the Fable Room at the 
Hotel St. Francis. Those in the party were: 
Mesdames Richard Derby, Hunter Liggett, J. 
Downey Harvey. John Wilcox. Eleanor 
Martin. William Younger, Frank Shaw. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Kimble gave a 
dinner dance Monday evening at the St. 
Francis for their daughter. Miss Barbara 
Kimble. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



AT DEL MONTE 

— The Del Monte polo team will leave this 
week for the South to participate in the 
tournament play that has been scheduled. 
The first game scheduled for Del Monte is 



set for this coming Sunday. The players 
named to support the Red and Yellow colors 
of the club are: Harry Hunt, at No. I; 
Eric Pedley, No. 2; Hugh Drury, No. 3, and 
captain, and Major Max Fleischmann, back. 
Felton Elkins will also go along to give the 
club a representation in the junior events. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John A. McGregor enter- 
tained at dinner at their home on Pacific 
avenue on Monday evening, having among 
their guests: Messrs. and Mesdames Rich- 
ard J. Hanna, Frederick Koster, Frederick 
W- Bradley, Frank I. Turner, Dr. and Mrs. 
Selfridge, Ryoza Asano (Japan). 

— The travel season is now on in Cali- 
fornia. Many prominent folk from the East 
are starting to arrive to enjoy the balmy 
winter climate and out of door recreations 
of the Golden State. A prominent party now 
at Del Monte Lodge is made up of Miss 
Lolita Armour, daughter of J. Ogden Armour 
of Chicago; Dr. and Mrs. G. A. Seavrens, 
Miss E. Billers and Miss E. Bissell. The vis- 
itors have been enjoying golf on the seaside 
links at Pebble Beach and have been taking 
the many scenic drives in this locality. 

— Mrs. S. Preyer gave a bridge and lunch- 
eon in the Empire room of the Fairmont on 
Monday. 



FAIRMONT DINNER DANCES 

The Saturday dinner dances at the Fair- 
mont Hotel, without any cover charge, and 
only $2 for each person, have set everybody 
to asking how it can be done. But they all 
agree that whatever the Fairmont manage- 
ment announces as on the cards will be done 
and well done. A fine orchestra plays until 
midnight in the beautiful Venerium dining 
room. 



WHERE PLEASURE AWAITS 

If you wish to enjoy a real Italian dinner, 
carefully selected and perfectly served, go 
to the Cafe Marquard any Tuesday night, 
when that gastronomic triumph is being fea- 
tured. Go any night, in fact, and you will 
not be disappointed, for Marquard's lives up 
to its name. The menu is always as fine 
as money, experience, culinary art and a de- 
termination to please can make it. 

It would be stretching the truth somewhat 
to say that Marquard's has made San Fran- 
cisco, but it is the exact truth that every 
visitor to San Francisco will carry away the 
pleasantest memory of it by being a Cafe 
Marquard patron. There one finds not only 
the best the market affords, but the finest 
dance music and entertainment. 



MANY ATTRACTIONS AT TECHAU 
TAVERN 

Aside from the change of policy by the 
management of Techau Tavern which has 
reduced the luncheon from 95c to 85c has 
abolished all cover charges except on the 
week-end days and holidays, and has estab- 
lished an excellent table d'hote dinner at 
$1.75, the character of entertainment, 
headed by the Three White Kuhns and Mary, 
a headliner act of the highest type, assisted 
by a georgeously gowned revue, featuring 
pretty girls in songs and novel dances. 

The dance orchestra, under the leadership 
of Elliston R. Ames, contributed its quota of 
snappy popular songs, and the very latest 
in jazz dance melodies. 

After the theater lucky dances with Miss 
Saylor's chocolates and Murad cigarettes 
find hearty favor with the discriminating pub- 
lic who nightly throng the attractive envir- 
onment at Techau Tavern. 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

Gus' Fashion 

The MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT 

65 Post Street. Near Market Street. 
Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners. 

FISH AND CAME A SPECIALTY 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 
Office*— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



PROMPT SERVICE 

is a feature of our daily luncheon. You can 
dine here in 30 minutes or less if you wish 

SPECIAL LUNCHEON. $1.00 

OR SHORT ORDERS A LA CARTE 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNER. $1.75 

Sunday and Week Days 

DANCING 

6 TO 9 EVERY EVENINC 

BERCEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE-DOG Co. 

421 BUSH STREET, ABOVE KEARNY 
Phone Douglas 2411 



Most Pleasant Time of the Year at 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

To Enjoy Sports and Social Pleasures 
CARL S. STANLEY MANAGER 




Would Tou Preserve Tour Lustrous Eyes? 

Use Murine Eye Remedy 



SAt_VE 



No Dressing Table Complete Without 
Murine As An Eye Tonic 



LIQU I O 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19. 192! 



^/fomohjh 




For Easy Starting 

It is obvious that warmth is desirable for 
starting the motor easily. However, for 
those who must start their motor cold, we 
suggest the following in the order given : 

Equip the car with radiator and hood 
jacket. 

Put the following anti-freeze solution in 
the radiator: A mixture of denatured alco- 
hol and glycerine in the following quantities, 
for Liberty: Alcohol, 1 1/3 gallons; 
glycerine, x /i gallon; water, 4 gallons. 

Take battery to charging station and have 
it charged and checked over. 

Have electrical equipment thoroughly 
checked over and adjusted by a competent 
mechanic — preferably at an official service 
station — to ensure there is no wastage of 
current due to bad terminal connections and 
insulation. 

Have carburetor adjusted at service sta- 
tion to suit weather conditions. 

Drain oil from motor and transmission, 
and refill both with a high grade thin or 
Arctic oil. 

Carry in your car a strip of wood with 
which to prop open the clutch. 

See that priming cup taps work easily 
and freely. 

Fill a small oil can with gas and keep it 
in a convenient place on the car. 

The above are general principles to ob- 
serve in putting your car in the best condi- 
tion for easy starting. Here are some fur- 
ther provisions to be observed at the time 
you stop your car, which will make it much 
easier to get the motor going again when 
you want to use it: 

Before switching off motor, pull down 
front flap on the radiator jacket. 

Race the motor for a few seconds, then 
switch off, opening up the throttle at the 
same time. 

Push out clutch and prop open with suit- 
able strip of wood before motor is switched. 

If the motor has been left long enough 
to become icy cold, squirt gasoline into the 
priming cups before cranking. 

Do not waste all the current in the battery 
by uselessly cranking motor if there is no 
response. With a stubborn motor wrap hot 
rags around the carburetor and inlet mani- 
fold. (This latter, however, should not be 
necessary if the above pointers are carried 
out.) 



What a Missing Spark Plug Does 

The first unit to feel the shock of a "miss- 
ing" spark plug is the wrist pin, up there in 
the piston. A knock develops which instantly 
cuts down power. Eventually new wrist pins 
are needed, which means that the motor 
must be torn down. 

The shock then follows up to the connect- 
ing rod and crankshaft bearings. A bearing 
knock develops. Your bearings wear out 
with undue rapidity. They must be taken 
out and rebabbited. More expense. 

Next the transmission. When a spark plug 
"misses" you know how the car jerks. The 
jerk passes through the motor to the trans- 
mission, causing worn gears and other trou- 
bles that lead to expense and dissatisfaction. 

The universal joint and the differential are 
then in turn affected by the "missing" spark 
plug, 'way up there in the motor. A strain is 
put upon these vital parts which they were 
never intended to withstand. 

All this shock and strain, all this wrench- 
ing and racking, finds its way back to the 
rear wheels where the propelling power is ap- 
plied to the road, and this power is notice- 
ably diminished. 

Consider now the effects of a "missing" 
spark plug on the starter and storage battery. 
Your starter churns, churns, churns. Then 
your battery runs down — and you're due for 
another trip to the service station. 

Again consider this: Your motor "fouls 
up" and excess carbon forms when your 
cylinders are not getting a spark or when 
they are not getting the right kind of a spark. 
Also the cylinder walls become scored and 
the raw gasoline filters through to thin your 
oil and raise havoc generally. 

Finally, there is a wastage of gasoline and 
oil due to inferior spark plugs. When you 
have a "missing" plug in your motor you 
have to drop into second gear at every little 
rise in the road. Then your engine over- 
heats. When you're traveling in second gear 
with a dead cylinder and an overheated en- 



gine you are consuming much more gasoline 
and oil than you would under normal con- 
ditions. In the course of a year the cost 
of gasoline and oil wasted through poor 
spark plugs iuns into an uncomfortable sum 
of money. 



Danger of Railroad Crossings 

Seventy per cent of those killed or injured 
at grade crossings in a three-year period 
were motorists, according to figures compiled 
by the Interstate Commerce Commission and 
just given publicity by the American Auto- 
mobile Association, which, through its tour- 
ing, good roads and legislative boards, is pre- 
paring a nation-wide agitation on this vital 
phase of highways travel and transporta- 
tion. 

"Three times as many American citizens 
were killed or injured at grade crossings in 
1917, 1918 and 1919 as were killed and in- 
jured during the Revolutionary war," states 
M. 0. Eldridge. the A. A. A. director of 
roads, who gives the American casualties in 
the principal battles as 6,600 and .places the 
grade-crossing killed or injured for the three- 
year period as 19,668 men, women and chil- 
dren, of which 5,605 died of their injuries 
within twenty-four hours of the accident. 

In spite of the combined efforts of rail- 
road and highway officials and automobile 
clubs, the total number of accidents con- 
tinues annually at about the same rate. 



Prisoners Make Auto License Plates 

In one of the departments of the Charles- 
town State Prison, near Boston, Mass., the 
prisoners make automobile license number 
plates for use in that commonwealth. Three 
thousand plates are turned out daily. The 
auto-plate section was started a little over 
a year ago and supplied the Slate of Massa- 
chusetts with all the plates for the year just 
closed. 



Necessary Lubrication for Ford 

The following tabulation gives an inclusive 
account of the necessary lubrication ot a 
Ford: 

Every day: Put oil through engine filler 
until it rises above the lower pet-cock. 

Every 50 miles: Look for oil, water and 
fuel leaks. 

Every 200 miles: Oil the front spring 
shackles; oil steering spindle bolts; oil ball 
and socket joints on steering rods; oil rear 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



February, 19, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



wheel hub brake cams; oil rear spring 
shackles; put vaseline in the commutator; 
turn grease cup on fan hub; turn grease 
cups on rear axle. 

Every 400 miles: Oil brake rod brackets 
and support; oil hood lacing; oil the start- 
ing crank; oil the door hinges and locks; 
turn grease cup at bottom of steering col- 
umn; turn grease cup on universal joint; 
turn grease cup at forward end of drive 
shaft; put grease or vaseline in front wheel 
bearings. 

Every 5,000 miles: Put grease in gear 
case under steering wheel ; lubricate spring 
leaves. 

Straightening Wire 

Stray pieces of copper wire have many 
uses, but it is often necessary to straighten 
out wire that has already been used before 
it can be employed again. See that there 
are no sharp bends or kinks in the wire and 
straighten out by hand any of these which 
are found. Fasten an end of the wire to 
some firm anchorage, grip it in the vise if 
necessary. Loop the other end of the wire 
around a hammer handle or similar instru- 
ment and then pull out the length of wire. 
Repeat this operation as often as necessary. 
If the wire is of soft copper, it will stretch 
a little, which improves it. 

Storage Battery Cable Protectors 

In many makes of cars there is a liability 
of the cables leading from the storage bat- 
tery, becoming worn by chafing against some 
metal parts. This will, of course, cause 
short-circuits, delays, and trouble with the 
battery. Make sure that this will not hap- 
pen by slipping a section of garden hose over 
the cable. If impossible to remove the ter- 
minal, then slit the hose and place around 
the cable and wrap with tape. This makes 
a protector that will last indefinitely. 

Curing Crack 

The following is a neat way of repairing 
a crack in the water jacket or any cast-iron 
part of similar nature: Dissolve some blue- 
stone, copper sulphate, in water. Clean the 
edges of the crack with sandpaper or a file. 
Paint the iron with the copper sulphate solu- 
tion until a thin layer of copper has been 
deposited on it. This surface will then take 
soft solder very nicely. 

Squeaking Brakes 
When brakes squeak when applied, it is 
sometimes due to the brake linings becoming 
worn so that the heads of the rivets holding 
the linings to the bands strike the drum. Re- 
move the bands and sink the rivet heads be- 
low the lining. If the linings are too thin, 
renew them. 

Carbon Remover 

A lew teaspoonfuls of denatured alcohol 



squirted into the cylinders while they are hot, 
after which the engine is run fast for a 
couple of minutes, is a good carbon remover. 
This simply amounts to substituting denat- 
ured alcohol for the kerosene that is com- 
monly used for this purpose. 

Overheating 

An ingenious automatic safeguard against 
overheating was recently devised. The 
ground for the ignition current was made by 
soldering a copper wire to the top of the rear 
cylinder. Just as soon as heat enough de- 
velops in the cylinder, the solder is melted 
and the engine automatically stops. 

Balky Starter 

When the starting motor stalls easily and 
fails to spin the crankshaft as it should, it is 
a safe bet that either the storage battery does 
not test up to the necessary 1.275 or that 
the contact points of the line switch are not 
making proper contact. 

Battery Connector 

A very .convenient battery connector may 
be made from a piece of heavy steel coil 
spring. The spring wire at each end is fash- 
ioned into a hook and these are slipped into 
the battery posts, the tension of the spring 
insuring perfect contact. 

Lens Cleaner 

A good compound to use in cleaning re- 
flectors is denatured alcohol and water in 
equal parts. The solution should be applied 
with a soft cloth which will not scratch the 
surface. 



Simple Filter to Clean Oil 

As a means of separating dirt, metal dust, 
etc., from used oil, the filter, which may be 
made in the following manner, will be found 
very efficient: Fasten a piece of muslin or 
cotton cloth to a metal or wooden ring large 
enough to fit over the top of a can, drum 
or other vessel. The cloth should be left a 
little slack, and into the shallow bag so 
formed, a quantity of sawdust is placed. 
The oil to be filtered is poured through and 
leaves its foreign matter behind in the saw- 
dust. 



Please Don't 

Don't operate a car until you are thor- 
oughly competent. 

Don't drive faster than the law allows. 

Don't drive in a reckless manner. 

Don't cut corners. 

Don't drive on the wrong side of the 
street. 

Don't pass a street to the left. 

Don't pass a street car while stopped tak- 
ing on or letting off passengers. 

Don't keep your muffler open at any time 
or place. 

Don't keep up a conversation while driv- 
ing or permit your chauffeur to do so. 

Don't drive with dazzling headlights. Re- 
spect the law. 



"Do you keep motoring accessories?" 
asked the man in the department store. 

"Oh, yes," replied the floor-walker, with 
a bow. "We keep arnica, court-plaster, 
witch-hazel. Drug department, second aisle 
to the left, sir." 



World's Most Beautiful 

AUTO SHOW 



February 19th to 26th 

( INCLUSIVE ) 

Exposition Auditorium -:- San Francisco 

■ — • • — — — ; • • • • ....... — 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANV 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Co. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 

TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19, 1921 




PLyEASUKE/'S WAND 



'Obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




A Delighted Audience 

The popular concert last Sunday at the 
Curran Theatre under the leadership of Al- 
fred Hertz, made music lovers regret that the 
series of affairs under his direction that have 
been such a source of delight, are drawing 
to an end for this season. 

The soloist at Sunday's concert was Kaje- 
ten Attl, who found a splendid opportunity 
for the display of his fine artistry in Saint- 
Saen's harp concerto in G major. It has 
been truly said of Kajetan Attl, that he is 
a musician who never disappoints, and cer- 
tainly his audience last Sunday had no cause 
to note an exception. His performance was 
one of the many things by which this series 
of symphony will be remembered with de- 
light. 

Rimsky Korsakov's "The Russian Easter," 
was another offering on Sunday which was 
highly appreciated by the large audience. 

The second half of the well-chosen pro- 
gram consisted of Schumann's melodious 
first symphony in B flat major, a work not 
often heard in San Francisco, and all the 
more acceptable to our symphony audiences, 
though repetition cannot rob it of any of 
its splendid artistic distinction. 



Next Popular Concert 

The next to the last concert in the popular 
series will be given by the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra next Sunday afternoon 
in the Curran Theatre. Horace Britt will be 
the soloist, offering three cello numbers. 
Faure's "Romance," "The Swan" of Saint- 
Saens, and Glazounow's Serenade Espagnole. 
The principal orchestral items are Grieg's 
second Peer Gynt Suite, the Theme with 
Variations from Tschaikowsky's Third Suite, 
and two ballet numbers from Saint-Saens' 
Samson and Dalilah. Other numbers listed 
are Lassen's Festival Overture, Gounod's 
Funeral March of a Marionette, the Norwe- 
gian Wedding Procession of Grieg, the Valse 
Triste of Sibelius and Johann Strauss' Per- 
petuum Mobile. 

A most unusual program will be presented 
at the pair of symphony concerts to be given 
next Friday and Sunday afternoons, which 
contains two works to be performed for the 
first time in America. The most important 
item is the "Amsterdam" symphony of Cor- 
nelius Dopper, who in this work has strik- 
ingly portrayed characteristic scenes in Hol- 
land. The other new composition is the 
"Vaegtervise" of Paul Juon, a fantasy on 
Danish folk songs. The program will open 
with the "Faust Overture" of Wagner. 

The popular concerts have grown in in- 
terest with every presentation. 



Orpheum Offers Variety 

Opportunity to see again that well written 
and well acted little bit of emotional drama, 
"Bide-a-Wee Home," was appreciated by 
Orpheum audiences. Elizabeth Brice has an 
elaborate act, much scenery and some bright 
songs. Her dance partner is Gattison Jones. 
Dora Hilton sang to delighted listeners, her 
repertoire is an excellent one and her voice 
is indeed lovely. McLallen and May Carson 
on roller skates do hair-raising stunts and 
keep up an accompaniment of humorous 
chatter. "The Two Doctors" causes much 
mirth, and Nugent, a monologist, is enter- 
taining. Coming out, -after the show, I was 
glad to see Special Officer Bill Gaffney lean- 
ing over the rail smiling broadly, evidently 



enjoying a period of relaxation watching the 
stage; by the way, have you heard that 
Orpheumites are going to give the politeness 
prize to someone in the lobby? 



Annette Kellerman Orpheum Star 

In her engagement beginning next week 
at the Orpheum, Annette Kellerman will 
dance, do impersonations, walk the tight wire 
and, of Course, dive. 

Other stars who will figure in next week's 
fine bill at th* Orphetro are: "Janet of 
Paris" in a piquant musical playlet called 
"Song Shopping," which will display her 
magnificent costumes', Stuart Barnet the 
ever-popular monologist; Don, the only dog 
— drunk; Flo and Ollie Waters, in song and 







ANNETTE KELLERMAN 
(herself) 

an Orpheum Star of Next tVeel/i Bill 



February. 19, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



chatter; the Ramsdells and Deyo in a new 
act; the Tuscano Brothers in their sensa- 
tional Roman axe hurling act. 

Elizabeth Brice and Gatison Jones will 
continue on next week's bill. 



Psychic Shivers Shake Alcazar 

The play is called "The Ouija Board," but 
it has more spooky surprises to the minute 
than any ouija ever turned out of the fac- 
tory. This Henry Shumer of the Alcazar 
is a clever chap, his is the stage direction 
and his discerning sense that prompted some 
humorous horseplay to relieve the psychic 
strain put upon us. We shouted, not alto- 
gether from amusement, but largely from 
sheer excitement, when he executed an occa- 
sional antic. Some suspense, the play of the 
current week! When it is over and the 
audience makes its way toward the doors, 
there is a noticeable pushing-in on the part 
of the people in the front seats — don't want 
to be the last ones in the theatre. The lights 
might go out suddenly, or sumpin'. Then 
we dash over to the nearest refreshment 
shop and scan the menu for an item that 
will soothe. The question is, will a praline 
parfait creme sundae special do it better than 
a hot malted caramel fudge? 



California Theatre 

A playwright with an axe to grind must 
do his work adroitly. "Paying the Piper" 
delights its audience and hands them a good 
lesson at the same time. The title indicates 
somewhat the line of action. "He who 
dances must pay the piper," you know. A 
good photoplay, splendidly enacted. Heller's 
orchestra is always a popular part of the 
California program, and Breitenfeld plays the 
big organ with fine effect. There are several 
singers and a violinist, as well as a dancer. 
These, with "Topics of the Day," on the 
screen and some other film bits, form the 
week's admirable bill. 



"Nobody's Fool"— Columbia 

Alan Dale has written a smart play for a 
smart actress, and the result is highly enter- 
taining. May Robson and the well-known 
dramatic critic have been friends for years, 
and when she asked him to write her a play 
she knew that he would provide a vehicle 
for her talents that would carry her straight 
to success. The comedy is light and full of 
laughs; Alan's cynicism is only skin-deep. 
Miss Robson's part of the devoted and ten- 
derly designing mother suited her to per- 
fection, giving ample scope to her engaging 
mannerisms and her fascinating little flight* 



from laughter to tears. The play lacked 
subtlety — but so does she. A thoroughly 
capable company supports the popular act- 
ress, and a strong whiff of "little old New 
York" comes to us with the performance. 



"The Gr«at Adventure"— Mairland 

The Maitland Players are giving an excel- 
lent performance of Arnold Bennett's pot 
ished satire this week. A few small errors 
here and there are as nothing among friends, 
and the most of them are up to the property 
man or whoever it is that furnishes copies 
of San Francisco evening papers to a gentle- 
man who cleverly enough finds in them ad- 
vertisements of London lodgings. The four 
acts of the comedy ran smoothly and with- 
out uncomfortable apprehensions. The act- 
ors read their lines intelligently. Mr. Mait- 
land was charming as the eccentric artist. 
Ham Carve, and Mary Morris has never done 
anything so well as the part of Jane Cannot. 



Winner of $1,500 Prize 

One of the most successful contests ever 
conducted through the columns of a news- 
paper closed last month when Miss Kath- 
erine Coral Burnett was chosen as the win- 
ner of a $1,500 prize contract offered by 
the San Francisco "Chronicle" to appear in 
a motion picture production to be made by 
Allen J. Holubar. 

Thousands of girls with aspirations to film 
careers responded to the contest by sub- 
miting their photographs. From these were 
selected weekly during the term of the con- 
test groups of contestants who were put 
through motion picture film tests. 

Before the final selection of the winner of 
the $150 a week ten-weeks' contract offered 
to the most promising film aspirant, the test 
pictures of the picked contestants were care- 
fully gone over by a committee of judges 
consisting of Harold S. Bucquet, assistant 
director of the Holubar forces; Miss Mai- 
jorie Driscoll of the "Chronicle," George 
Ellis of the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph 
Company; Frank Burt, general manager of 
the Pacific Studios, and Miss Dorothy Caf- 
fin, motion picture writer. A second and 
more elaborate series of test films were then 
made of the twelve most likely contestants, 
and these in turn were again submitted to 
the judges, who in the final analysis awarded 
the coveted prize contract to Miss (Catherine 
Carol Burnett. 

Miss Burnett is a California girl and one 
whom the judges felt to be representative 
of the young womanhood of which the West 
is so justly proud. She is a typically tall. 



SAMPLE DRESSES. 

SUITS AND COATS 

AT WHOLESALE PRICES 



BARGAIN HEADQUARTERS 

for 

WOMEN'S WEAR 



NO SHOP IN TOWN LUCE 

MISS JO'S 



MISS JO'S DRESS SHOP 

Rooms 361-363 PACIFIC BUILDING - 821 MARKET STREET 

ROY L. NEUMANN (MBVURMMM 



slender, bright-eyed girl. In announcing the 
decision of the judges to confer the prize 
contract upon her, Bucquet said: 

"In my opinion Miss Burnett is the most 
promising candidate in the contest. I am 
accustomed to passing upon thousands of 
aspirants. I have no hesitation in recom- 
mending Miss Burnett as the winner, because 
she seems to me to possess the' two most 
requisite qualities for screen success — per- 
sonality and intelligence." 



Farewell to Senor Anderson 

Miss Esther Mundell presented her pupil, 
Senor Edilberto Anderson, at an informal 
recital she gave at her studio in the Gaffney 
building on Thursday, February 17. Among 
those present who heard Senor Anderson's 
exceptional baritone voice were Mrs. Dow- 
ney Harvey, Mrs. William Younger, Mrs. 
Harold Mann, Mrs. W. B. Hamilton, Mrs. H. 
B. Morrow, Mrs. Burke Smith, Mrs. A. B. 
Spreckels and others. It was in the nature 
of a farewell, as Senor Anderson leaves for 
the East very soon to take up his duties as 
Peruvian Consul. 



"Tommy, can you spell?" 
"Sure! I can even spell words of four 
cylinders!" 




Next Week— Starting Sunday 

Annette Kellerman 

FLO A OLLIE WALTERS 

Janet of France j Stuart Barnes 
Vokes & Don 

THE RAMSDELL8 <fc DKYO 

TUSCANO BROTHERS 



TOPIC- ok HAY 



ORCHESTRA 



Elizabeth Brice 



Mntinees— 26e to $1.00 Evenines— 2&C to $1.50 
MATINEE DAILY— Phone Doutlas 70 
Scalpers' Tickets Not Hon 



Ramona Grill 

172 ELLIS STREET 

Breakfast . . 50 and 75 cents 

Served from 7 a. m. to 2 p. m. 
Lunch .... 60 cents 

Dinner $1.00 

Served from 5 to 8 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidayt J 1.25 



THE BEST THE MARKET AFFORDS 
•Prr/Va Comtmt DtlithtfiMy Stn*4 

A PLACE OF REFINEMENT 

CAFE RAMONA 

172 ELLIS STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19, 1921 



SUNBEAMS 



SHE WAS A VAMP 

She was a vamp. But she didn't use lip-stick and she 
didn't touch up her eyebrows. She didn't wear extreme 
clothes and she didn't powder her nose ostentatiously. If she 
rouged, no one was aware of it. Her costumes were simple. 
She believed that woman's place was in the home and that 
women should leave politics to men. 

She never told shocking stories and her "breaks" were very 
innocent. When she crossed her legs she carefully pulled down 
her skirts — after a brief moment. 

Her ways with men were irresistible. For she was so young, 
so inexperienced and so helpless, such a fragile and lovely 
little piece of femininity that there was never too much one 
could do for her. It was like doing things for a child. 

For she was a real vamp. She knew enough not to look 
the part! — Mary Graham Bonner in Judge. 



Burr Mcintosh said in an address at the Hotel Commodore 
in New York: 

"Some men get credit for qualities they don't deserve. It's 
like the case of a girl I know. 

"'What a brave, brave girl Mary is!' said a young man 
in enthusiastic tones. 

"'Mary brave? How so?' inquired the young man's sister. 

" 'Why, at the dance last night,' said the young man, 'she 
was the only girl who kept her seat and remained perfectly 
cool when the mouse appeared.' 

"'Pshaw!' said his sister. 'That wasn't bravery. Mary 
told me afterward that she had her old garters on.' " — Albany 
Knickerbocker-Press. 



To those who contribute to the support of humane work 
and the animals' welfare only under pressure or when cornered 
by some humanitarian, financial strategist, the attribute of 
Farmer Applegate's cow applies: "How much milk does that 
cow give?" asked the summer boarder. 

"Wal," replied Farmer Applegate, "ef you mean by volun- 
tary contribooshun, she don't give none. But ef ye kin get her 
cornered so she can't kick none to hurt, an able-bodied man 
kin take away about 'lev'n quarts a day from her." — Our 
Dumb Animals. 



The cheery caller tried to persuade old Aunt Martha not 
to dwell upon her troubles, telling her she would feel happier 
if she ignored them. "Well, honey," said the old lady, "I 
dunno 'bout dat. I alius 'lowed when de Lord send me 
tribulation he done spec' me to tribulate." — Boston Transcript. 



"Re the authorship of Shakespeare's plays, may I quote 
from 'Twelfth Night,' Act I, Scene 5? Thank you. 

" 'Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and white 
Nature's own sweet and cunning hand laid on.' 
"This is unquestionably bacon." — Punch (London). 



"Yes, son, see how papa is getting gray-haired worrying 
about you and your disobedience!" 

Observant Son — Well, pa, then you must have been an 
awfully naughty boy, because grandpa's hair is all white. — 
Boston Globe. 



She — How could you truthfully tell that sharp-tongued Miss 
Gabby that she reminded you of a flower?" 

He — So she did, but I didn't mention it was a snap-dragon. 
— Baltimore American. 



"My dear, did you hear that Jack and Mabel are having 
trouble in regard to the validity of their marriage?" 
"Oh! How terrible!" 



"Yes, it appears that the minister hadn't paid his dues to 
the union." — Life. 



Wife — But, my dear, you've forgotten again that today is 
my birthday. 

Husband — Er — listen, love. I know I forgot it, but there isn't 
a thing about you to remind me that you are a day older than 
you were a year ago.- 



-London Opinion. 



The city man was very proud of the big one he had caught. 
"Yes, sir," said he, "tips the scale at fourteen pounds." 
"Humph!" snorted the old timer, "place's just about fished 
out. We used to use those for bait." — Judge. 



Contractor — Don't you see that sign: "No Work Today?" 
Colored Applicant — Yussah — dass why Ah applied. — Judge. 



"Yes, I cast my hat into the political ring. 

"How'd you make out?" 

"Poorly. Didn't even get back my hat." 



-Judge. 



Kind Old Lady — Why are you crying, my boy?" 
Boy — Pa fell down stairs. 

Kind Old Lady — Well, don't cry; he'll be all right soon. 
Boy — Yes, I know; but my sister saw him fall all the way, 
and I never saw nuthin'!" — London Answers. 



The taxi driver turned at the end of the second hour and 
eyed his client suspiciously. 

"Are you taking me by the hour or by the day?" he asked. 

"By the year," responded the haggard passenger. "I'm 
looking for a home!" — Pearson's Magazine. 



Golfer — "Aren't you aware that it is very dangerous to 
allow a child to run about the links alone?" 

Maid — " 'S all right, sir — the poor little feller's stone deaf." 
— A. E. Bestell in London Blighty. 



"She told me that I might kiss her on the forehead," com- 
plained the ardent lover. "I like her cheek!" 



Lady (to colored servant) — I've told you several times, Lily, 
to put your hand over your mouth when you yawn. 

Lily — Yas'm, but I got bit the last time I tried it. — Every- 
body's. 



"Bix, you're a friend of mine, aren't you?" 

"Not if it's over $2 you want." — Boston Transcript. 



He had been fishing, but with bad luck. On his way home 
he entered a fishmonger's shop and said to the dealer: "John, 
stand over there and throw me five of the biggest of those 
trout!" 

"Throw 'em? What for?" asked the dealer in amazement. 

"I want to tell the family I caught 'em. I may be a poor 
fisherman, but I'm no liar." — London Tit-Bits. 



"Enjoy your hunting trip, old man?" 
"I certainly did." 

"Have anything along with a kick in it?" 
"Yes, the gun." — Boston Transcript. 



Soap Box Orator — An' I tell you that all them millionaires' 
money is tainted — all of it. 

Unconvinced Person — 'Ow d'ye mean "tainted"? 

Soap Box Orator — Well, 'taint yours, an' 'taint mine, is it? 
— Everybody's. 



We read that Dante went through hell 
To find his sweetheart, tho' around her 

Fierce flames might rage. Most fellows — well, 
Go through it after they have found her. 

— Punch Bowl. 



THE OPEN SHOP HERE TO STAY 

That untiring advocate of the open shop. 
"The Spectator," published at Portland, Ore- 
gon, by Hugh Hume, formerly a San Fran- 
cisco editor, says : 

"To devise means to prevent the spread 
of the open shop movement, a meeting of 
the American Federation of Labor will be 
held in Washington this month. The feder- 
ation might as well make plans to change 
the currents of the Pacific or alter the unde- 
viating courses of the stars. The open shop 
movement is a peaceful, determined, invinci- 
ble revolt of the public against the intoler- 
able union despotism that not only demands 
a monopoly of the labor, but that also insists 
on controlling the capital and managing the 
politics of the country. 

"Samuel Gompers, who issued the call for 
the meeting, declares that those who are try- 
ing to establish the American plan of em- 
ployment — the open shop — are seeking to 
destroy unionism. Mr. Gompers is in error. 
Those behind the open shop movement are 



trying so to Americanize our industries that 
no competent citizen who is looking for work 
can be barred from employment because he 
has not seen fit to join a union. Of course, 
if labor unionism is founded on the closed 
shop — which is wholly monopolistic and un- 
American — and cannot survive if denied the 
self-asserted right to say who among us shall 
or shall not be permitted to do business or 
shall or shall not be allowed to earn a living, 
then, it must be admitted, labor unionism is 
in a very bad way, because the open shop is 
coming. No one wishes to destroy the labor 
unions; but over 90 per cent of the citizens 
desire to see restored to the national bill of 
rights, which includes freedom of speech and 
freedom of the press, freedom of labor." 



"Did that multimillionaire tell you how he 
succeeded in piling up a huge fortune?" 

"He didn't go into all the details," replied 
the smart young man. "but I gathered from 
his remarks that he must have had some 
expert legal advice." 



PRESENT-DAY PLAYWRIGHTS ARE 
WONDERS 

"This is an age," writes William Lyon 
Phelps in a review of Arnold Bennett's plays, 
"when more excellent dramas are being writ- 
ten in English than at any period since the 
days of Queen Elizabeth. Brander Matthews 
in a review of 'The Famous Mrs. Fair and 
Other Plays' by James Forbes, elaborates this 
judgment. Today our playwrights know 
their trade. They are expert workmen. 
They know how to build a plot, how to peo- 
ple it with human beings, how to arouse 
the atention of the audience, to retain it and 
satisfy it." 

Shakespeare did not, of course. It's well 
for William he died before these present-day 
wonders come on the stage. 



Bother — Bessie, why don't you wash the 
dishes? It is easier to do a thing than to sit 
and think about it. 

Bessie — Well, mother, you wash the dishes 
and I'll sit and think about it. 



CAPITAL $2,000,000.00 



EARTHQUAKE - FIRE - AUTOMOBILE 

PATRONIZING AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS 
IS PRACTICAL PATRIOTISM 

The North River Insurance Co. 



Incorporated 1822 



Pacific Department 

266 Bush St., S. F. 



Harold Junker 

Manager 




RESPONSIBILITY 



From (he quarry where the 
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through the processes of 
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the hnal assembly and fab- 
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one organization demon- 
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Booklet "DN" on Memo- 
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RAYMOND GRANITE COMPANY, Inc. 

COXTRACTORS 

GRANITE— STONE-BUILDING— MEMORIAL 

> Poircro Avenue. S*n Francisco. 1350 Palmetto Street. Los Angeles. 



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Prospect 7932 



Night Phone 
Franklin 2789 ' 



KENDALL & DARNEILLE 

AUTOMOBILE MACHINISTS 
Eight Cylinder Specialists 



472 TURK ST.. near Larldn 



San Francisco 



Cypress Lawn Cemetery 
Flower Shop 

At A/en> Office Building 
Arrangements for having flowers placed upon 
plots, in private Mausoleums, or in front of 
niches in Columbarium, may be made at the 
City Office or the Cemetery. 

Plants and Cut Floieers 
for Home Use. 

CITY OFFICE: 

995 MARKET STREET 

Hcwes Bldg.. S. F. 

Telephone Sutter 695. 

Cemelery Address: 

COLMA, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone Randolph 679. 



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where- regret. 

Let our expert automobile electricians 
inspect your starting, lighting and 
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insurance against a breakdown at an 
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GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

MASTE* atlTOMOBlLE ELECTRICIANS 
955 Post Sfr«t SAN FRANCISCO 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

1174 Phelan Building, San Francisco 

Has a practical system of placing manuscripts (or 
publication, which is important to people who write. 

Frank criticism and competent revision are also 
available. 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipmtz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORIE - McLAREN CO. 

FLOR'STS. NURSERYMEN 

and 
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141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Maleo 

Phone San Maleo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



CLOCK 
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WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specialty 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

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We carry an attractive line of new clocks 

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Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping, Manager 



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STORAGE 

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1626-1636 Market St, 

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AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro 
prietors 



$24,655,500.00 
16.750.000.00 



Aggregate Assets. 30lh 
Sept. 1920 




$362,338,975.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

357 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian Slates. New Zealand. Fiji, Papua (New 
Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australasian Banking 
Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 

Agents : 
Bank of California. National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Natl Bank. Crocker Natl Bank 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capita! $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reseive Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francico, Cat. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7lh Avenue 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Haighl and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31, 1920 

Assets $69,878,147.01 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits 66.338.147.01 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2.540,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund. $343,536.85 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER. Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys 



BOND DEPARTMENT Sutter and Sansome Streets 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON PARIS Phone Kearny 5600 

NATIONAL BANK San Francisco, Calif. 

OFFERS... 

JJ seletlion of eight corporation bonds, to yield J torn 7 c ,' f to 8% on the investment. 
The term of these carious issues is from one year to fourteen years, thus meeting the re- 
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Our service is at your service. 
'Detailed information on request. 
For Income Tax Exempt fRonds, ask for Circular T. E. 



Established July 20 1856 



STATE | 




AND 

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PRICE 10 CENTS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1921 $5.00 PER YEAR 



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Your business and inquiries solicited 



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MEMBERS SAN FRANCISCO STOCK EXCHANGE 

117 Russ Building SAN FRANCISCO 







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POLK and POST STS. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

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548 Sacramento St., cor. Leideedorff 



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Tires and Accessories 

PHONE GARFIELD 600 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
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Etlablished 1855 
37-45 FIRST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 




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Specialist in Women's and Children's Diseases. 



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£«*S>«*8xSxs*8*$><8*s*J*8>«we*8KS><^^ 



#au jFranrifirp (BfrnmirU 



Lending Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 



A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for 90 cents a 

month — including Sunday editions. 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 





vol. xcix 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1921 



No. 9 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cat. 
Telephone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second- 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year, $5.00. Foreign: One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

President Harding has named his Cabinet and should be proud 

of his work. 



While everybody is sorry that the retiring President should de- 
part from the White House a sick man, it is gratifying to know that 
he can pay $150,000 for the mansion he has just bought and im- 
proved in Washington. 



How could there be found a better selection for Secretary of 

State than Charles E. Hughes? 



The Ship of Stale will be on an even keel in the next few days 

with all sails drawing in the fair wind of Prosperity. 



"Italy pins hopes on waiving of loans by the United States, is 

a cable dispatch from Rome. It will need more than a pin to sustain 
that gay illusion. 



Controller Chambers announces that the report of the State 

Budget Board is "only advisory." And, he might have added, 
"mighty bad advice at that." 



What has become of that hifalutin declaration of war-time 

democracy, that henceforth small nations the world over should have 
the right of "self-determination"? 



It is a great deal easier to sit down and subdivide the map of 

Europe and Asia on paper, than make the arrangements stick. Lloyd 
George and Company are finding that out. 



Another million-and-a-half has been ordered by Congress to be 

squandered on "Prohibition enforcement." A billion-and-a-half 
would not put the bootleggers out of business. 



If the optimism of the exhibitors at the San Francisco auto 

show in the Civic Auditorium is any indication, the motor business 
is going to be better than ever this year — and that is saying some- 
thing. 



Will it be possible for the United States Navy to bear the awlul 

blow that will fall on it. March 4. when the Honorable Josephus 
Daniels slips out the back door and beats it for the ancestral water- 
lank? 



The labor union politicians continue to exert pressure to save 

the two accused police judges from the recall. If the labor organi- 
zations were wise in their generation they would let up for a while 
on interference with courts and judges. 



Never forget that if the Soviets should make a bonfire of all 

Europe and themselves, Uncle Sam could raise enough within his 
borders to keep everybody fat and sassy. How many nations can 
do as much? 



An American President, with his enormous powers, needs a large 

stock of solid sense, and resolute morality, to restrain him from 
such errois thai his retirement from office shall not be the occasion 
of universal rejoicing. 



Our influential contemporary, the Chronicle, declares that "San 

Francisco has stopped groping in the thicket of indecision." If that 
be correct, the City Hall gang must have been kicked out of office — 
but we haven't heard of it. 



What a burlesque on democracy its high priest, Woodrow Wil- 
son, made of it. By Congressional hocus pocus he got $150,000,000 
out of the public treasury to spend as he wished. Talk about South 
American dictators! Mere pikers. 



The worst feature of Woodrow Wilson's assumption of mon- 

archial airs at the Peace conference was not the cost, which now 
bothers Congress, but the sycophantic attitude of many of our Amer- 
ican publications. 



No use in making a Congressional fuss over the money spent 

(or the American Peace Commission's splurge in Paris at the Hotel 
do Crillon. You could not expect a grand monarch who crossed the 
seas from New York with a fleet of war ships to put up at a $6 a 
week boarding house in the Latin quarter. 



Lloyd George's oracular utterances with regard to the nations 

of the earth are quoted as if the little Welsh lawyer could show a 
special permit from heaven to reorganize. But as a famous dramatist 
once said: "Caesar, dead and turned to clay, would stop a hole to 
keep the wind away." 



"Bankers lend hand to boost development." is the heading of 

an article in the San Francisco Chronicle. Before they start, let 
ihem publish it broadcast that every honest American citizen who 
comes to California will be protected in his constitutional right to 
accept lawful work without dictation from labor politicians. 



The charge made by Assemblyman J. 0. Bishop of San Diego 

that undue influence is being used to swing votes for the King bill 
at Sacramento is a serious matter. He should not waver in his 
determination to call for a public investigation. Are administration 
machines to become as indecent and dangerous as the old corrupt 
professional ward bosses? 



The California White and Sugar Pine Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion, representing 90 per cent of the total pine lumber production in 
California, has lined up against Governor Stephens' forces which are 
trying to carry the King tax bill. The measure produces more 
revenue than the taxeaters need, is the basis of the lumber people i 
opposition to the State machine. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 26, 1921 



■DIToBlAL 




for wielding a whitewash brush. In the shuffle the finest popular 
attraction of our Federal bench may be grabbed up by the movies. 
It is a tense situation in Congress. 



History tells us that George Washington was the 
Nobody Safe target of attacks by his contemporaries. Nobody 
seems safe from envy and misrepresentation. Even 
that dauntless champion of human justice. Federal Judge Keneshaw 
Mountain Landis, of Chicago, has been viciously assailed in good 
repute by a member of the House of Representatives — some Con- 
gressman fron Ohio — one Welby by name, a Democrat. 

God save democracy if many lawmakers like Welby of Ohio are 
to have much of a hand in making the world safe for it! Under 
shelter of his office this lawmaker has launched proceedings in the 
Congress of the United States to impeach an eminent jurist, whose 
life has been one long and noble sacrifice to preserve the liberties of 
the people. But the shafts of malice will rebound, harmless, from 
Judge Landis' shining armor of integrity and wound only the 
assassins of reputation that wish to strike him down; for no doubt 
this Ohio Congressman, who has suddenly sprung from his ambush 
into the open, is but the shadow of a conspiracy against the brave 
jurist who had the hardihood to fine Standard Oil twenty million 
dollars — the fearless exponent of human justice who set free a poor 
bank clerk receiving $90 a month who had to steal $96,000 to buy 
the necessary coffee and doughnuts to sustain existence. 

Pseudo moralists like Congressman Welby of Ohio would doubt- 
less argue that a thief is a thief, whether his wages are ninety bucks 
per month or a million a year, and $96,000 is a large appropriation 
for doughnuts; but it is time lost to argue with such people. 

And what is the offense alleged against Judge Keneshaw Mountain 
Landis which would warrant impeachment by Congress? "Violation 
of judicial ethics," in accepting the $47,000-a-year job of arbiter 
of baseball, which sport at present is in sore need of disinfection 
and the whitewash brush. 

No doubt if Judge Landis had resigned his Federal judgeship be- 
fore linking up with the baseball bunch, Welby would have remained 
silent — difficult as that task is for a Congressman — but we see no 
indication of any national or other lawmaker letting go of his own 
regular meal ticket before annexing a better one. Not even by a 
surgical operation can the average Congressman be separated from 
the national payroll, and certainly no one would class Welby of Ohio 
as above the average. His effort to dim the lustre of the brightest 
star in the Federal Judicial galaxy classifies him. 

But this is a digression. The point of argument is that the favorite 
pastime of young America happens to be in sorry plight through the 
indictment of several of its illustrious exponents. Like a bawd 
stripped of her finery, the Favorite stands, naked and ashamed, in 
the market place — and what more decorous than that she should be 
clothed? If with the ermine of Justice, converted into an ample 
Mother Hubbard, to hide her from the eyes of the gaping crowd, so 
much the better. Who so gallantly can perform the act of mercy 
as Judge Keneshaw Mountain Landis. the premier exponent of hu- 
man justice and scornful enemy of narrow conventionalities? To 
err is human, and to forgive divine. 

It is no doubt hopeless to reason with Welby, but Congress should 
see clearly the necessity of suppressing him before irretrievable dam- 
age be done. Let Judge Landis keep his two jobs, for it is clear 
that they cannot be separated. If divorced from his judicial author- 
ity, on whom can the country rely to take the United States Supreme 
Court by the whiskers and shake it up? Minus his judgeship, the 
baseball bunch will want to cut down his $47,000 fees as too large 



The effort of Governor Stephens to force through 
Public Robbery the King bill at Sacramento is only the prelimi- 
nary skirmish in a great battle between the people 
and the taxeaters in California. The fact is at last being realized 
that the power to tax is the power to confiscate. Already the con- 
fiscation stage has come into view. 

It requires but the momentary examination of a few totals to 
understand the condition to which a wasteful State government lias 
brought California. 

The Johnson administration was far from being one that could be 
condemned as mean and stingy. Quite the contrary. In 1915, 
under Governor Johnson, the budget for two years was $36,000,000. 
The general expectation was that under Governor Stephens there 
would be a reduction of State expenses. There was much talk to 
that effect, but the budget did not accord with the hopes of the tax- 
payers. In 1921 under Stephens the budget for two years was 
$81,000,000, an increase of $45,000,000. 

Just ponder for a moment on what this staggering increase means. 
It represents to the unfortunate owners of every bit of property in 
the State an increase of 

$22,500,000 for each year. 
$1,875,000 for each month of two years. 
$61,643 for each day of two years. 
$2,568 for each hour of two years. 
$42.80 for each minute of two years. 

Does it look right? Does it look reasonable? Do the taxpayers 
want to pay it? Of course not. But politics has reached that stage 
in California where the taxpayers no longer count for anything. 
The taxeaters hold the fort. They have become the source of all 
authority. They have learned that organization counts for every- 
thing in public robbery as in public progress. The present state of 
California's finances is a disgrace to civilization. It savors more of 
the methods of Asiatic despots than a white man's government. 
T he tax-gatherers are no longer guided by considerations of what 
the State can be run for, but of what amount the people can be 
robbed. 

For this condition the people themselves are to blame, for they 
have permitted their office-holders to overtax them, so as to create 
powerful political machines. Every addition to the political machine 
represents an additional salary for some political incumbrance, which 
the taxpayers must furnish out of their purses. The robbery of the 
taxpayers is as thorough as if armed bandits on the highway had 
taken the honest citizens' money. The taxpayer cannot resist the 
levy of taxes once that the Legislature has spoken, and the victims' 
only hope is that in advance of the fixing of the tax-rate the law- 
makers may give heed to public protest against ruinous appropria- 
tions. 

In the present contest against the King bill at Sacramento, it is 
made to appear that the Governor is fighting the corporations. 

That smoke-screen should not deceive any person. Governor 
Stephens is trying to take $81,000,000 out of the pockets of the 
people of California, to strengthen his enormous political machine. 
and the State government can be run for less than half the sum. 
Johnson got along on $36,000,000 in 1915. 



The laying of the cornerstone of the Legion of 
A Princely Gift Honor Palace in Lincoln Park last Saturday was 

one of the great occasions which will be treas- 
ured in the history of our city. When San Francisco shall have a 
population of many millions, its citizens can point proudly to the 
magnificent gift of Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Spreckels in 1921, which 
created a monument worthy of heroes and typified in the master- 
piece the time-honored friendship of America and France. 



February 26, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



The End Of Our World 



IT is accepted by Joseph McCabe, as be- 
yond discussion, that our world must 

come to an end some fine day. The only 
questions are when and how? 

Few recent books have attracted more 
attention than Mr. McCabe's book which 
has been published by Dutton of New York 
and in London by Routledge. It is a book 
intended not for savants, but for the un- 
scientific world, and its style is therefore not 
overtaken with obstruse terms. 

Present-day astronomers are by no means 
agreed on the theory of the world's extinc- 
tion. They have various theories that differ. 
Mr. McCabe sets forth the various specula- 
tions as to cosmical finality, but does not 
condemn any of them except the theory of 
destruction by some comet. He favors the 
idea of recurring glacial eras of which the 
world has survived several. It may have 
one too many, and become a dead world. 

From the astronomical point of view, our 
globe is already "dead," or has at the most 
a feeble pulse of vitality. But it is the cos- 
mic law that what we call life shall arise 
only on a dead world, and it is possible be- 
cause here the analogy with living things 
fails. The heart of our world is 92,000,000 
miles away. As long as the sun maintains 
its vitalizing stream above a certain level, 
we live. Will the heart fail? Will the cold 
rigor of death one day rob earth of its color 
and movement? 

But, after all, the earth is not dead yet. 
but only dying hard, as it proves by earth- 
quakes and volcanoes. "The belt of rock" 
on which we live is only about forty or fifty 
miles thick yet, and this belt, in comparison 
"with the fierce interior, is hardly thicker 
than the shell of an egg." It should not 
surprise us, therefore, that the molten mat- 
ter "bursts or oozes from below through 
every pore and fissure. If the earth is still 
contracting, as is generally believed, the 
pressure must increase and the strain on the 
rocky shell become more severe." 

It is not astonishing, then, that some of 
our uncivilized ancestors expected the death 
of humanity through fire. Some of them 
predicted it through flood. The prediction 
varied according to the locality of the tribe, 
whether it suffer most from flood or earth- 
quake. "Sometimes a great fault or dislo- 
cation in the seams of rock discovers itself, 
and the masses of rock snap together with 
a jolt that shakes large cities into ruins." 
If. as is said. 13.000.000 people have met 
their deaths by earthquake and volcano 
during the last 3,000 years, that is a small 
toll of the thousands of millions who have 
trodden the earth during that period, and we 



are in a condition of comparative stability. 
"The question of interest is whether there is 
any danger of the malady increasing as the 
earth contracts." 

Shall we die by the loss of water? So 
died the moon, and on Mars, which is un- 
questionably dying, the water is almost gone. 
Physicists tell us that on the earth gas and 
water are continually escaping into outer 
space. But this theory Mr. McCabe dis- 
misses on the ground that, so much heavier 
a globe is ours, the length of time required 
for the escape of water and air makes our 
possession of them practically permanent. 

Of the possible death of our world from 
water, Mr. McCabe says that the sea gives 
as much as it takes. Once there was a con- 
tinent in the Atlantic Ocean, on which ani- 
mals walked from Africa to America; "but 
Europe and the United States and Central 
America hardly existed in those days." 
"Once there was a continent connecting 
Australia, Antarctica, South Africa and 
South America; but the bulk of our Asia, 
Africa and South America did not then 
exist." 

Regarding the scientific theory of recur- 
rent ice ages McCabe believes we are living 
in the penumbra of the latest one. which 
set in some four million years ago. Ice 
ages apparently shorten by some 50 per cent 
at each recurrence. Formerly there was no 
winter. There were no zones of climate. 
There were no polar capes. Since the last 
Ice Age we have permanent ice-sheets at 
the Poles, broad temperate latitude and 
marked changes of seasons. Winter set in 
between three and five million years ago, 
and the chilling of the Polar Circles began 
between one and two million years ago. 
Mr. McCabe concludes that if there is a 
permanent principle at the base of this 
phenomenon, it is obvious that the earth 
will endure a permanent Ice Age long before 
the millions of years of which astronomers 
speak are run out. Unfortunately the geo- 
logical estimates of time are still so con- 
flicting that it is useless to attempt to pre- 
dict the time when this condition may be 
reached, supposing that the progression is 
maintained. 

Still, he reckons about five million years 
between the cretaceous chill and the last Ice 
Age: and if the rate of progress of the Ice 
Ages continues at the same rate as in the 
past, if the interval between them continues 
to narrow in the same proportion, he thinks 
the permanent one is due some five or six 
million years hence. 

This assumption is highly comforting to 
humanity. 



Mr. McCabe disposes in a confident style 
of the fears of world catastrophe by col- 
lision with a comet. 

"We have no more reason," he says, "to 
fear a passage through the tail of a comet 
than a locomotive has to fear an encounter 
with a trail of smoke." 

It was easy for the astronomer of the 
nineteenth century to demonstrate that the 
tail of a comet "was the thinnest of phan- 
tasms," through which the stars shine. The 
head gave more trouble, but was finally 
found — at least the theory has never been 
discredited — to consist of a great number of 
meteors. Meteors are harmless to us; when 
they enter our atmosphere at their great 
speed they are rendered incandscent and 
generally reduce to ash. Some of the larger, 
minus the quantity melted in the atmosphere, 
reach the earth. Mr. McCabe speaks of the 
crater at Devil's Canyon, Arizona, three- 
quarters of a mile in diameter and more 
than 400 feet deep, which there is some 
reason to believe was made by the impact 
of a large meteor. 

But those which do reach the earth are 
a small proportion of the immense number 
which only reach our atmosphere to burn 
there and never come to the ground. He 
calls it "an invisible army that assails our 
globe day after day." The figure is usually 
represented as between twenty and a hun- 
dred millions a day. Such meteors, coming 
together to form the head of a comet, but 
still detached from each other, might do 
some damage, but could not bring about 
the end of the world. 

As for other stars, "no collision is pos- 
sible within the limits of our solar family." 
If there were discordant planets in the solar 
system, they were long ago drawn into the 
other planets, and the paths which the re- 
maining planets must tread were eternally 
fixed. 



Phone 
Prcwpect 7932 



Night Phone 
Franklin 2789 



KENDALL & DARNEILLE 

AUTOMOBILE MACHINISTS 

Eight Cylinder Specialist* 



4~2 TURK ST.. near Urkin 



San Francisco 



Cypress Lawn Cemetery 
Flower Shop 

At (V«B Office Building 
Arrangements for having flowers placed upon 
plots, in private Mausoleums, or in front of 
niche* in Columbarium, may be made at the 
City Office or the Cemetery. 

Plants and Cut Flower* 
for Home Lse. 

CITY OFFICE: 

995 MARKET STREET 

Hewes Bldg., S. F. 

Telephone Sutter 695. 

Cemetery Address: 

COLMA, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone Randolph 679. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 26, 1921 



Growing Hostility 



AVERY strong article on the growing 
hostility of the American public to 
labor unionism appears in the New 
York Times of February 13. The Times is 
regarded as one of the greatest newspapers 
in the world, ably edited and uniformly con- 
servative. The author of the article is W. 
A. Starrett, who selects as his text the recent 
expose of graf' in the building industry in 
New York, which caused the chief trickster 
to be sent to state prison for ten years. 

Nearly every city of any size in the coun- 
try, Starrett says, has had disclosures similar 
to the amazing expose in New York. "The 
pity of it all is that the hard-toiling, plodding 
laboring man, betrayed by his elected lead- 
ers, is the victim." 

It is on him that the hostility of the com- 
munity falls. "He is branded as the out- 
standing profiteer in wages and the apostle 
of economic unrest," whereas he has no voice 
in his labor organization. 

"Labor always has had and always will 
have public sympathy," says Starrett, "but 
it is a far cry from labor, as such, to the 
camarilla of leaders that draw from twenty 
to thirty thousand dollars a year, and not 
satisfied with that must needs plunder public 
enterprises, and throttle the industrial activi- 
ties of whole commonwealths in order to in- 
crease their incomes." 

Labor organizations are much in need of 
housecleaning. argues the author of the crit- 
icism in the Times, and "plain workmen of 
the rank and file" must take a hand in the 
scrubbing and fumigation. 

Starritt cites some cases to show the moral 
laxity to which vicious leadership of labor 
unions has led. To use his words: 

"A sinister assault upon the fundamental 
moralities was perpetrated when the presi- 
dent of a certain union, and thirty-eight or 
so of his accomplices, were sent to prison for 
bomb outrages; and while he was in prison 
his followers re-elected him to the presidency 
of the union. Again, another prominent 
union has to its discredit the re-election of 
an official during his term in prison for some 
crime that could not in any way be canon- 
ized as an act in defense of his union." 
* * * 

The enforced incorporation of labor unions 
is advocated by Starrett in the Times. 
Whether that regulation would compel them 
to keep their agreements is really of second- 
ary importance. The principal benefit would 
be publicity with regard to the disbursement 
of the vast sums that come into the hands of 
some labor leaders. 

"Whence these vasts sums? How are they 
administered?" asks the Times correspondent. 



"What of the experience and fitness of the 
individuals who control them? What ac- 
countability do they give? The facts seem 
to be that the questions of labor finance and 
labor leadership are all bound up in one, and 
both disappear into an appalling obscurity, 
judged by such standards as govern banking, 
corporation management, or, in fact, any 
known form of orderly business administra- 
tion. As for the average union election it is 
a crude and haphazard affair. 

"The condition in which labor finds itself 
today proves for the thousandth time that a 
certain laxity of method produces a certain 
result, and that the sentimental appeal to 
public sympathy for 'the down-trodden,' the 
'sanctity of labor,' and all other high sound- 
ing phrases are merely illusive gestures. In- 
side politics, the stultifying of free voting, 
and gang rule are the inevitable concomit- 
ants of the policy many unions have allowed 
to flourish. 

"If there was ever a victim of its own 
Frankenstein, it is unionism of today," de- 
clares Starrett. Its secretiveness, lack of 
business system, and other defects threaten 
it with destruction. 

"It is not to be assumed," admits Starrett, 
"that all labor leaders are corrupt. The sup- 
position to make is that every union is largely 
composed of men of integrity, who, if given 
a fair and properly supervised election at 
the union polls, would develop splendid qual- 
ities of common sense. In fact, anybody 
having to deal with these unions knows that 
among their leaders they still have men of 
the highest purpose and incorruptible beyond 
all question; but the tide of the uncontrolled 
system sets strong against these men, and 
unless some drastic measure of protection is 
devised, they will be swept out of office as 
surely as would the decent element of our 
Government should all restrictions on our 
election laws be removed, and the polls left 
exposed to roving bands of gunmen and 
guerrillas. 

"Through their lack of internal control 
and lack of firm and orderly business admin- 
istration, the rank and file of union labor is 
exposing itself to inevitable ruin, because 
they are losing public sympathy, and without 
public sympathy their system will immedi- 
ately be flouted out of existence. Such an 
outcome would be a calamity, for the value 
of unions in gathering together the skilled 
artisans, in creating a central body with 
which the employer can deal, in providing 
machinery for the presentation and adjust- 
ment of grievances and. in fact, in giving 
unified expression to labor's desires, has be- 



come so well established as a part of indus- 
try as to be indisputable. 

"Nobody ought to desire the destruction of 
labor unions, but it is the duty of everybody 
to view fearlessly their structure and mechan- 
ism. To approve them in principle, and then 
blindly fly to an idealized conception of them 
as practical working organizations, is to do 
them an injury almost as great as to oppose 
them altogether." 



POETRY DEFINED 

The most noteworthy failure in literary 
criticism from the very beginning has been 
the failure to define the simple word poetry. 
Almost every critic has made his own at- 
tempt, and he falls to the ground between 
the ideas of poetry itself, the form of the 
vessel containing it, and the labor of the 
craftsman in turning out the vessel. Few 
critics have really concerned themselves with 
their proper task, the exact definition of that 
peculiar quality of great poetry that differen- 
tiates it from mere verse. It is that differen- 
tial quality we want defined, not the mere 
outward shell or method of work, or effect 
upon the reader; but that quality which it is 
the object of every true poet to obtain, the 
light that never was on sea or land, the con- 
secration, the poet's dream. 

This mysterious quality is the sole object 
of the poet; it is not a mere accidental ac- 
companiment of technical finish, but that 
without which he would consider all his 
labor to be in vain. — Alfred Noyes. 



OFFENSIVE PARTISANS IN DANGER 

Ohio postmasters and other Federal of- 
ficials who helped circulate slanderous and 
scurrilous stories in the late Presidential cam- 
paign will have a hard time holding their 
jobs, says Senator Willis. Willis is Presi- 
dent-elect Harding's successor in the Senate. 

The Federal brigade in California was as 
busy on the mud-throwing job as the Ohio 
postmasters. How busy the guillotine will 
be if the California boys get their just re- 
ward. 



WANTED 

Oriental Rugs, Antique 
and Modern Furniture, 
Art Goods, Silver and 
Sheffield Plate, Paint- 
ings, Prints, Books, 
Etc., Etc. 

H. TAYLOR CURTIS CO. 

855 Mission Street 
Telephone Kearny 2332 



February 26, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



LABOR IN FRANCE 

Although a good deal is heard as to the 
prevalence of unemployment in France, a 
Paris correspondent writes to The London 
Economist: "A glance at the official figures 
furnished by the Labor Minister, setting forth 
the situation down to the latest date, indi- 
cates that, as compared with the state of 
things in Great Briain, unemployment is a 
comparatively negligible factor." During the 
week 26,168 persons had applied for em- 
ployment at the various labor bureaus 
throughout France (of whom 16,483 were 
men and 9,685 women), or 1,040 less than 
during the previous week. At the same time, 
offers of employment to the number of 4,369 
failed to find a satisfactory response, or 
1,229 fewer than during the previous week. 

Of the toal number of 26,168 unemployed 
1 4,665 (or 56 per cent) were resident in 
the Paris area. In that district the categories 
of labor showing the largest proportions of 
unemployed were the clothing trade, metal- 
lurgy, building trade, shop assistants, etc., 
unskilled labor, and food trades. A signifi- 
cant feature was that there were 575 appli- 
cants for work as domestic servants, and 
only 268 vacancies notified, which appeared 
to indicate that the scarcity of labor of this 
kind that has prevailed since the early days 
of the war is now disappearing. The total 
number of unemployed drawing relief from 



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the 225 departmental and municipal unem- 
ployment funds was 13,507 (of whom 
10,669 were resident in the Department of 
Seine), or 79 more than last week. 

The maximum number of people drawing 
allowances from these funds since the armis- 
tice was reached in April, 1919, when the 
figure stood at 1 1 6,000 (of whom 77,5 1 4 
were resident within the City of Paris). In 
the Roubaix-Tourcoing district, where the 
wool trade normally employs 46,000 hands, 
34,000 are now working from two to four 
days a week, while 2,000 are idle. At Lille 
the whole of the cotton mills are working 
short time, half of them forty hours a week 
and the rest varying from 48 to 25 hours. 
In the Rhone district about 15 per cent of 
the metal workers are idle, while some of 
the silk factories have recently reduced their 
time from 44 to 40 hours. Many manufac- 
turers have reduced hours and arranged for 
their employes to work in shifts, in order to 
keep their personnel together during the 
present slump; but conditions are normal in 
the metallurgical factories. 



GERMANY'S 96-CENT LABOR? 

The New York World points out that Wal- 
ter Rathenau, head of the German electrical 
industry and an astute financier, attempts in 
the Berlin Tageblatt to prove, by an examin- 
ation of German man-power and its earnings, 
the impossibility of the Entente reparations 
schedules. 

Germany's 15.000,000 workers have in 
300 eight-hour days 36,000,000,000 working 
hours a year to dispose of. At half a gold 
mark an hour this would produce 18.000.- 
000.000 marks of values. One-third of this 
must go for raw materials and food. By 
paying the indemnity the remaining 1 2.000,- 
000,000 gold marks "will gradually be re- 
duced to 6,000.000,000." And how will 
Germany, which spent 24,000.000.000 -marks 
before the war, live on one-quarter of that 
sum? Only by destitution "unworthy any 
human beings" or by "extending our work- 
ing hours" for industrial laborers "from 
eight to fourteen hours." 

Herr Rathenau knows that workers in 
other lands will not stand for imposing the 
fourtcen-hour day in Germany and that no- 
body wants to see Germans living in degrad- 
ing squalor. He knows, too, that it is not 
easy to compute in gold marks what men 
would earn who are actually paid in a fluctu- 
ating paper medium. 

The basic fallacy of this reasoning lies in 
the assumption that the German laborer, 
who was before the war the most efficient in 
Europe, can produce only 96 cents a day. 
Once Germany is set on her feel by a definite 
arrangement of her fiscal future, that as- 
sumption becomes untenable. Considering the 
impetus the war gave to the use of machin- 
ery, the productivity of the German work 
hour is likely to be greater than before the 



Yet the Rathenau idea has its value. What 
better basis for figuring out the reparations 
can there be than to ascertain what German 
workingmen can produce without long hours 
that endanger elsewhere the advantages that 
workmen have gained or impose living con- 
ditions that endanger or degrade themselves? 
When this is known the limits of possibility 
will be established. 



HEARST DELIGHTED 

"Day after day the American public has 
been told in propagandist cables from Eu- 
rope that the Soviet leaders were either dead 
or dying; that Russia was dotted all over 
with mutinies and massacres; that the Soviet 
armies had neither real leadership nor dis- 
cipline nor loyalty nor adequate military 
equipment; and that both the Russian people 
and the Russian armies were being rapidly 
starved into a becoming state of submission. 
4 . . And then look at the actual facts 
which these lying governments in London 
and in Paris are no longer able to keep hid- 
den. Read what they now admit in their 
fright and bewilderment. 

"The Russian Soviet armies, led with the 
utmost skill, numerous, enthusiastic and well 
equipped for war, have reconquered all the 
territory occupied, for a time, by Polisn in- 
vaders and by the different adventurers in- 
spired and financed and equipped secretly by 
England and France." — S. F. Examiner. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 26, 1921 



Art Sale With Geishas 



GEISHA girls, so venerable as to be 
eligible for entry to an old woman's 
home, are described as attractions at 
a Japanese art sale. 

It was a strange sight for an American 
who had idealized the typical geisha as an 
Oriental vamp. The manner of conducting 
the auction was also surprising to the West- 
ern art connoisseur. His impressions are 
thus described 

The Japanese auction differs in every 
point from the auction in this country. The 
public is not invited and only dealers who 
are specially asked can come. Instead of 
the buyers being urged to buy by the auc- 
tioneer, the selling goes on so quickly that 
if they do not speak on the instant their 
chance is gone, and the lowest bidder is al- 
ways obliged to pay a fine. Also, outside 
of the actual business hours of the sale, 
there is an accompaniment of saki and 
geisha girls. The geisha girl is different 
from the generally accepted idea of Japan's 
public entertainers. 

Japanese print auctions are something in 
the nature of picnics. There are usually 
two or three of them in the year, though 
they are irregular, and if the stock of prints 
is low there may be none for the period of 
a year, and then two or three will be held 
within a short time. They are usually held 
in a Japanese hotel at Hakone or Kamakura 
or some of the small towns in the watering 
place district south of Yokohama, where the 
hot springs are, a few hours ride by train 
from Tokio. 

There is a great deal of drinking of saki 
in the evenings, and while the auction is due 
to begin at 10 o'clock in the morning it is 
some time nearer noon when it opens, for 
the buyer's heads are not in condition for 
quick work before that hour. There are 
always the geisha girls as entertainers, the 
same old ones year after year. Young girls? 
Not at all. The younger girls are the dancers. 
The youngest keisha girls I saw were forty 
and the oldest sixty, and I never saw a pretty 
one. I would back our chorus girls against 
any of them. They are a pretty vulgar lot. 
too, in my opinion. 

Europeans never go to these sales, but I 
went by invitation. I couldn't do the bidding 
myself. I couldn't have understood. They 
were too quick for me, and then they don't 
bid in the Japanese money in common use. 
They never bid so many yen, but "one piece 
of silver" or "one piece of gold," which is 
the form of money used before the restora- 
tion. For some reason it is the custom to 
use it at the auctions. 

From twenty to thirty dealers attend the 



auction. Most of these have some other 
line besides print selling, but there were at 
least twenty when I was there who make 
their living selling prints. They draw lots 
for seats. They sit on the floor in a circle 
or horseshoe. There are about 850 lots and 
of that number 350 are catalogued. A lot 
may mean one print or many. Sometimes 
you will have to buy a basketful of prints 
to get the one you want. You may find 
some very good prints in a lot of exceed- 
ingly poor ones. The rarest prints are sold 
separately, but some sets of prints that are 
very good will go together and bring good 
prices. You used to be able to get many 
sets of Hiroshige's, but lately the lots of 
prints have been getting smaller. 

There are three forms of auctions in 
Japan, but only in the cheapest, where they 
are clearing out a house, does the auctioneer 
stand. He sits at the print sales and calls 
out the number to be sold regardless of 
order. You must know what is coming next. 
The prints are passed to the buyer sitting 
nearest the auctioneer, hurried around the 
circle and back to him again. The bids are 
given on the instant, the highest price offered 
is called, the name of the bidder is put on 
the print or prints and they are placed in a 
pile by themselves. The name of the second 
highest bidder is also called, for he gets a 
bonus for having bid up the print. If in a 
sale you get everything you wish, you may 
be sure that you have paid too high prices. 
If you do not get anything you will know 
that your bids were too low, and if you 
get a moderate number of desirable prints 



and several bonuses you may feel that you 
paid about the right market price. A way 
of bidding is to write the bid on the inside 
of shallow, red-lined saki cups that the buy- 
ers hold and throw them up to the auc- 
tioneer. The sale usually lasts two days, 
continuing until 7 o'clock in the evening 
the last day. It goes with remarkably celer- 
ity. There are two societies of dealers in 
Tokio, who hold meetings once a month and 
sell to one another. 

There are art clubs in the larger cities — 
Osaka, Kioto and Tokio. etc. — where the 
principal people are stockholders. For the 
sales they have ballot boxes where the bids 
are dropped. But the paper is stamped with 
the club stamp, is recognized by the club, 
and only dealers can buy. A dealer can 
take a customer, and I have dropped my 
own bid in the box, but the dealer's name 
was given if the bid won, not mine, and I 
paid him a small commission. 

As far as I know the aristocracy of Japan, 
which would never have anything to do with 
the Japanese print at the time the art was 
in its prime and the artists living, is not yet 
interested in them. The bourgeoisie, the 
people who have recently made money, have 
taken up the prints, but they did not do it 
until the prices went up. The prices for 
prints are lower, I think, in Japan than here, 
though for some rare prints they pay top 
prices. Good mica prints by Utamaro would 
bring more in Japan than in New York, 
probably 5,000 yen each. $2,500. 



LIGITIMATE REASON 

Marjorie — Why didn't you give Henry a 
hand when his car broke down, instead of 
hurrying by the way you did?" 

Mr. Goff — "Give him a hand? Good 
Lord, I sold him the car ! " — Judge. 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Go. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 



TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



ASSETS OVER $1,000,000.00 

PATRONIZING AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS 
IS PRACTICAL PATRIOTISM 

RICHMOND INSURANCE CO. 



Organized 1836 



Pacific Department 

266 Bush St., S. F. 



Harold Junker 

Manager 



February 26, 1921 AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



The World's Greatest Fortunes Were Made In Oil 



Here is an oil story written for YOU! 

It also is an OPPORTUNITY presented to YOU! 

If YOU care anything about making a FORTUNE, read it. 

The world is crying for oil. YOU KNOW IT! 

Oil is in greater demand than any other product of the earth. YOU 
KNOW IT! 

The great nations of the world at this moment are juggling for control 
of sources of oil supply. YOU KNOW IT! 

Then why not seize the opportunity to become an actual 
partner in a great, legitimate, tested California oil enterprise? 

The vastest fortunes in the world have been made in oil. Far VASTER 
FORTUNES will be made in oil in the years to come. 

Countless fortunes have been made buying stock in new oil companies 
in new fields. In almost every case the stock was bought when offered at 
lowest price. If the buyers had waited for oil gushers to be brought in they 
could not have made fortunes — for they would not have paid the price de- 
manded for the stock THEN. 

But here is where your opportunity is greater than any 
that has gone before! 

The Sumac Oil Co. is a new company but in a proven oil field. Even 
its first well already has GONE INTO OIL. 

It has taken over the property of the former Cygnet Petroleum Com- 
pany in the North Coalinga field in Fresno County. Twenty years ago the 
Sygnet Petroleum Company drilled down 1200 feet into oil bearing sand. 
The oil was analyzed and FOUND GOOD. 

Then fate stepped in. Fire destroyed the derrick before the sand had 
been penetrated, and in an incredibly short space of time death took toll of 
all three of the controlling capitalists in the enterprise. The well was neces- 
sarily abandond until the estates of the three deceased promoters could be 
straightened out. The late Charles Fair, who was killed in a sensational 
automobile accident in France, was president of the Cygnet Company. 

Recently a group of business men of San Francisco acquired the old 
Cygnet holdings and organized the SUMAC OIL COMPANY, to resume 
drillings and operations on the property. 

They capitalized at $500,000 and decided to offer for sale 100,000 
shares of capital stock, at par value of ONE DOLLAR PER SHARE. 
For this sale the State Corporation Commissioner of California has given his 
permit. 

The officers and directors of the SUMAC OIL COMPANY include 
Col. George K. McGunnegle (retired U. S. Army Officer), president; R. N. 
Scheller, vice-president; Dr. Howard Herrington. secretary and treasurer; 
J. C. Steele, M. E., and Maurice De Rieux. 

There's the story. Do you see your opportunity? 

MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY See what a small investment in oil has done for others and 

may do for you : 

$100 invested in Fowler Farm brought $ 15.000 

$100 invested in Trapshooter Oil Co. 40.000 

$100 invested in Kern River Co. 8.000 

$100 invested in Pinol Oil Co. 10.000 

$100 invested in Lucile Co. 16.000 

$100 invested in Union Oil Co. 165.000 

$100 invested in Home Oil Co. 40.000 
$100 invested in Paraffin Oil Co. in 10 years paid 492.000 



Sumac Oil Company, 

Claus Spreckels Building. 

San Francisco. California — 
Please send me. without obligations, further details 
of the Sumac Oil Company. 

Name 

Address 



SUMAC OIL COMPANY 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 26. 1921 



In The World of Commerce 



many, in overseas trade or steamship opera- 
tion. 



IT IS WITH the object of calling attention 
to the unlooked for, and overlooked, oppor- 
tunity this item is written. The time was 
when we were carving out present-day con- 
ditions out of the rough and the uncouth of 
the past. Men "made money" easily in those 
days. It was the reward coming to those 
adventurous spirits who pioneered. This was 
followed by the period in which the smaller, 
more numerous and more modest, fortunes 
were made. An opportunity seemed to open 
up in the Wes: with the rising of successive 
suns. Now, that day is of the past. The 
man of average means, the smaller condi- 
tioned business man. the professional man. 
finds but few if any opportunities • for the 
investment of small capital. The opportun- 
ity is here, however, and it is to be found in 
the stocks of standard corporate concerns. 
The average American citizen has now come 
to the days of thrift. His chance to make a 
little, and lay by a little, is to be found in 
the judicious selection of stocks as invest- 
ments. To many, the habit is only a be- 
ginning, and the Liberty Bond has done just 
that much good. The reason why France 
is such a resiliency prosperous nation is be- 
cause the French people have learned thor- 
oughly the lesson of thrift and because they 
know how to invest their savings. 

The people of California could do a great 
work for themselves in backing up the stocks 
of industrial concerns by purchasing. What 
the West coast needs is factories and the 
people are perfectly well able to provide 
these by subscribing to the stock of such 
concerns. We have builders of motors, of 
trucks, of tractors, of agricultural machinery, 
of all kinds of necessities, of chemicals, of 
dyes, etc., all of them on the road to success, 
yet needing the help of the local investors to 
expand their works or to establish themselves 
in business. California is so hedged in by 
advantages, through her climate, that it is 
an ideal commonwealth in which to start a 
manufacturing establishment. The manifest 
advantages are fast overcoming all of the 
disadvantages. Originally, we had no fac- 
tories at all and we were dependent entirely 
on the industrial production of the Eastern 
states. Then we came to the stage of factory 
assemblage and plants for "fabricating," out 
of the partially manufactured article, were 
established at various seaboard points. To- 
day, we are entering the Industrial period, 
of which no man may dare imagine the 
eventual unfoldment. 

We have oil and we have "white fuel" in 
abundance. We must see to it that every 
possible encouragement be given in a legis- 
lative sense to those who have developed, or 



who may desire to develop, the great hydro- 
electric potentialities of the state. 

And, on the other hand, these activities 
can be stimulated and encouraged by public 
investment in the standard securities issued 
by such companies. There are opportunities 
on every hand, but it is necessary to safe- 
guard such investments by the very best 
judgment obtainable. Where the profit to 
be derived is said to be large and immediate 
the investor can afford to be wary. 

The price trend is still downward. There 
are many instances were items declining out- 
numbered the advances during the past week. 
Evidently, stabilization is not yet accom- 
plished. General trade conditions improved 
slightly. While a spirit of optimism is being 
fostered, the returns in collections do not in- 
dicate a markedly easier condition. The 
banks are once again marking time. In ex- 
port and import trade there is a slight im- 
provement, and this, of course, is being re- 
flected in shipping circles. 



SHIPPING— During the week there have 
been recrudescent rumors of two big shipping 
concerns being in such straits that there was 
no knowing which way to turn. One of 
these, it was said, had made an urgent ap- 
peal to the Shipping Board to help it with a 
large sum to continue in business. One of 
these concerns is not only engaged in ship- 
ping business, but is also a big world mer- 
chandiser. It is unfortunate such stories 
should be made current on such slight foun- 
dation. It is true that one of these concerns 
was caught, at the time of the ceasing of 
hostilities, loaded up with goods bought at 
war prices, and that it has had a very hard 
time pulling itself out of a very bad tangie. 
It is also true that the shipping concern has 
many ships on the seas and only a compara- 
tively small capital with which to operate. 
It is safe to predict that neither of these firms 
is in nearly as bad a shape today as two 
months ago, and both will weather the finan- 
cial storm. The rumor is that the Shipping 
Board is to go on laying off vessels. Until 
we have built our export and import trade 
on a more solid base and until we have 
amended our laws, as affecting the sailor 
man, and until the masters, mates and pilots, 
and the sailor men themselves, come volun- 
tarily forward with some proposition by 
which the cost of operating a vessel shall be 
cut to meet competition, and until costs of 
repairs of vessels and cost of fuel is cut to 
a very large extent, we cannot hope to con- 
tinue as a very serious factor in competition 
with England, France and, later on, Ger- 



MINING — Wherever it is possible, mining 
activities are continuing throughout the win- 
ter months, and the prediction is made freely 
that, when the season for mining really 
opens up, there is going to be a development 
such as never before has been seen in Cali- 
fornia or Nevada. In oil mining a feverish 
activity exists among the geologist-prospec- 
tors, and while the big companies are making 
it a habit to pooh-pooh the stories of new 
territories, or of probable development work 
whenever anything like a well is struck, a 
cloud of representatives of such corporations 
is immediately on hand looking into what the 
future may bring forth and as to how the 
lucky owner of the erstwhile "prospect" may 
be made to let go of his well. There have 
been many new developments in California 
fields within a year, and Wyoming, Montana 
and Texas, as well as Louisiana, have added 
their quota of gushers or just ordinary pro- 
ducers. 



INSURANCE— Robert L. Hunter, with 
headquarters at San Francisco, is to repre- 
sent the Norwich Union as special agent in 
Northern California. He will enter upon his 
new duties April I . 

President William B. Joyce, of the Na- 
tional Surety Company, is spending his usual 
winter vacation in California. 

They are still talking of the Fire Under- 
writers' Association of the Pacific's meeting 
on the street. Certainly all of those who at- 
tended have reason to remember the good 
time they had and the instructive and valu- 
able intercourse enjoyed by all. 



"KILL LLOYD GEORGE," CABLE 

An American newspaper correspondent, to 
report the action of the League of Nations, 
filed in the telegraph office a rumor that 
Lloyd George was on his way. A few min- 
utes later it was announced that the British 
Premier had no intention of visiting Geneva, 
whereupon the correspondent hurried to the 
telegraph office and filed a cable despatch 
beginning: "Kill Lloyd George." 

Returning to his hotel the newspaper man 
found in his room several detectives, who 
searched his trunks, seized his correspon- 
dence, notes and other papers, and took him 
to police headquarters. 

Being informed by telegraph of the pre- 
dicament of the "conspirator," other Amer- 
ican and English correspondents called at 
police headquarters and convinced the cap- 
tain in charge that their colleague was 
neither a bolshevik nor a Sinn Feiner, nor in 
any other way dangerous, explaining that in 
American and English newspaper parlance 
the word "kill" means simply to suppress. 
Thereupon the American "would-be-mur- 
derer" was set free with apologies. 



February 26, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



Farmers' Profits Vanish 



FROM the Federal Bureau of Markets 
comes the report that "farmers all over 
the country are complaining of losses." 
The railroad rates are so high that after the 
freight charges are paid the farmers find that 
they have sustained losses, instead of making 
profits. Is all the blame to be laid on the 
railroads? Some of the farmers whose sor- 
rows are related by the Federal Bureau of 
Markets think they have ample cause to be 
angry. 

Take the case of that Florida truck farmer 
who sold 400 crates of lettuce in New York 
for $339.48. The freight, alone, amounted 
to thirty-seven cents more than the market 
price. Then there was a war tax of $12.52, 
a charge for icing, and a commission charge. 
Instead of receiving a nice check for profits 
on the sale of the 400 crates of lettuce, the 
unlucky Florida farmer got a bill for 
$152.17, due the commission men. 

A grower at Laredo, Texas, sent a carload 
of spinach to New York, which was sold for 
$467.35. His freight charge was $627.47. 
When he paid that and all the other charges, 
the Laredo man owed his broker in New 
York $253.31. 

Similar instances are reported from vari- 
ous places. The market having dropped be- 
low expectations and the freight charges 
make profit impossible for the farmer. 

How is such a state of affairs to be im- 
proved? It cannot be improved until the 
great economical laws of the world take 
precedence of politics. 

America is such a rich and productive 
country that we have proceeded on the 
theory that we could be a law unto ourselves. 
Supply and demand might affect poverty- 
stricken nations in the Old World, but never 
in the United States. Philosophers with out- 
worn theories borrowed from antiquity might 
argue that labor is a commodity like any 
article of .purchase and sale, but the United 
States Congress knew better and had adopted 
a law repudiating the notion. It might be a 
commodity on the other side of the Atlantic, 
but Providence and democracy working hand 
in hand, on this side of the ocean, decreed 
that human labor in America has a mystic 
property which places it outside the formal 
relations of purchaser and seller. 

To insure that human labor in America 
should be protected in its semi-sacred at- 
tributes, we maintain a national Department 
of Labor, and many state and county 
bureaus, to insure that the honest toiler shall 
not fall a defenseless victim to the wiles of 
capital. Above and before all we see to it 



that the great aggregations of capital, acting 
as common carriers, under sanction of gov- 
ernment, shall be made to recompense, prop- 
erly, the people who do their work. 

So far have we carried this governmental 
paternalism in helping labor to receive com- 
mensurate wages from railroad corporations 
that the railroad workers look to our govern- 
ment arbiters and adjustment boards as their 
real masters and directors, and not to the 
officers of the corporations. In other words, 
the management of the great enterprises has 
been taken out of the officers' hands, for 
they no longer have full authority to enforce 
discipline. That is claimed to be one of the 
reasons why the operation of railroads is 
more costly, the farmers' freight bills larger, 
and his margin of profits converted, in many 
cases, into losses. 

The railroad corporations must meet in- 
creased outlay for labor and taxes by in- 
creased rates or cease to exist. 

For thirty years popular political leaders 
have been demanding lower freight charges 
to shippers, cheaper rates to travelers, and 
higher wages to all railroad employes. No 
satisfactory solution of that difficult problem 
has been reached, though we have created 
a powerful Interstate Commission to curb 
profiteering transportation companies. Still 
the farmers complain. They spend their time 
and money in raising crops and the freight 
charges eat up most of the expected profits. 

The situation is one calculated to cause 
the farmers grave apprehension. They are 
not likely to find any important reduction in 
labor costs to the railroad which might be 
made a basis for reduction of freight rates. 
The Adamson law has established the eight- 
hour day on railroads and a Labor Board 
has been created. 

It will be remembered that the Adamson 
law was forced through Congress by the 
threat of a strike which would tie up all the 
railroads in the country. President Wilson 
indorsed the eight-hour day "as the judg- 
ment of humanity." and the railroads claim 
that the new arrangement has added much 
to their labor bills. 

Before the passage of the Adamson law 
the railroads paid labor on a different plan. 
Many years ago the principle was adopted 
of paying men in the train service, engineers 
and firemen, for instance, on a dual basis. 
Standard wages were established for a day's 
pay. The pay of a passenger engineer in 
1917 was fixed at $5.05 per day for locomo- 
tives weighing 250.000 pounds and less 
than 300.000. The present rate is $6.80. 



A day's work was defined to be 100 miles 
or less; 6 hours and 40 minutes or less; 
at present 5 hours or less. In freight service 
a day's work was defined to be 10 hours or 
less, 100 miles or less. At present it is 8 
hours or less. The rate was higher than in 
passenger service. 

Where the passenger engineer received 
$5.05 on a locomotive of the weight men- 
tioned, the through freight engineer serving 
on a freight locomotive of the same weight 
received $5.60 for a day's work, and the 
local freight engineer $5.90; at present, 
$7.98. Overtime was computed on a pro- 
rata basis, that is, at the same rate as the 
basic day's pay. The practical result as 
defined in the schedules was that in almost 
all instances the pay of an employe was com- 
puted not on the number of days worked in 
the month, but on the number of miles run. 

There was no concerted or national move- 
ment for the unification or standardization 
of wages and working conditions until the 
events which led up to the passage of the 
Adamson law in 1916. The vital part of 
that law reads as follows: 

"That, beginning Jan. I, 1917, eight hours 
shall, in contracts for labor and service, be 
deemed a day's work and the measure or 
standard of a day's work for the purpose of 
reckoning the compensation for services of 
all employes who are now or may hereafter 
be employed by any common carrier by rail- 
road." 

Since the Adamson law was passed, the 
labor unions through their chiefs have con- 
ducted an agitation to perpetuate all the 
advantages accorded them by the Director 
General during the war emergency, and to 
induce all the railroads to agree to the for- 
mation of national boards of adjustment. 
Most of the roads are unalterably opposed 
to the adjustment measure. So the prospects 
of further troubles ahead are disquieting for 
producers. If the labor costs of the railroads 
increase, the freight rates cannot be reduced, 
and if a great strike should occur the farmers 
would be the first victims. 



TURNING BACK 

L ndoubtedly the world needs a moral re- 
generation. But this will only be delayed 
by identifying morality with boredom. A 
Sunday given over entirely to sanctimonious 
inaction is as undesirable as a Sunday given 
over entirely to the pursuit of frivolous and 
unprotective pleasure. Both are essentially 
unmoral. What the world needs is a happy 
medium between the two. a blending of seri- 
ous thought, and wholesome recreation, of 
self-respecting responsibility and personal 
freedom. Then the rational religion that we 
need, and the return to church going that 
should be universally desired, will be possi- 
ble. It will never be possible by an attempt 
to turn the wheels of twentieth century in- 
telligence back to the middle ages. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 26, 1921 




ociot 




— The marriage of Miss Lucretia McNear 
and Mr. William Hill Thomas took place at 
half past two Tuesday afternoon at her home 
at McNear's Point, near San Rafael. About 
a hundred relatives and friends from here 
and across the bay were there. The cere- 
mony was performed by Reverend Lynn T. 
White. The bride is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Erskine B. McNear of McNear's 
Point, and a granddaughter of the late John 
A. McNear of Petaluma. The late Mr. 
George W. McNear of Oakland was her great 
uncle, and there are many relatives and fam- 
ily connections in San Francisco. Mr. 
Thomas is a son of Professor and Mrs. W. 
Scott Thomas of Berkeley and is in business 
in Bakersfield. where the young couple will 
live. 

— The largest affair on Monday's social 
calendar was the fancy dress hop given by 
the Army set at the Officers' Club in the 
Presidio. The affair was a brilliant success 
and was attended by a number of the 
younger set. A number of the officers and 
their wives entertained guests at dinner be- 
fore the ball. 

— Miss Marion Jones was hostess at a de- 
lightful dinner dance given in honor of Dr. 
and Mrs. Lester B. Cranz (Naomi Hoelscher), 
who have recently returned from their hon- 
eymoon. The guests were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Leroy Linnard, Mr. and Mrs. John Burnham, 
Miss Nadine St. Germaine, Mr. Fred Van 
Sicklen and Mr. Sherman Hoelscher. 

— Affairs are being given daily during the 
visit of Captain and Mrs. Clifford Erskine 
Bolst of London, who are guests at the Hotel 
St. Francis. Mrs. Bolst, who is the former 
Mrs. Fletcher Ryer, has a host of friends in 
California and New York, and has been wel- 
comed at numerous affairs since her arrival 
from London. Informal luncheons have as- 
sembled the friends of the visitors each day, 
and on Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Hayes Smith entertained at dinner, 
having among their guests Captain and Mrs. 
Bolst, as well as Mr. and Mrs. Ross Ambler 
Curran, who also arrived on Monday from 
New York. Mr. and Mrs. Curran are guests 
at the Smith home. 

— Mrs. Andrew Simpson gave a luncheon 
and bridge party at the Fairmont gray room. 
She was assisted in receiving by her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Dan Volkmann. The luncheon 
table was especially attractive and was 
trimmed with five baskets of fruit blossoms. 
Huge vases of blossoms decorated the room. 
The guests included Mrs. August Schilling, 
Miss Elsa Schilling, Mrs. George Volkmann, 



Miss Johanna Volkmann, Mrs. Henry St. 
Goar, Mrs. James H. Bull, Mrs. Florence 
Porter Pfingst, Mrs. George King, Mrs. Bent- 
ley, Mrs. E. B. Stone, Mrs. Frederick Van 
Sicklin, Mrs. Frank Johnson. Mrs. R. G. 
Pierce, Mrs. Murison. Mrs. C. W. Owen. Mrs. 
Houghton and Mrs. M. W. Kales. 

— A number of luncheons were given 
Monday at the St. Francis, the largest of 
which was presided over by Mrs. A. B. 
Spreckles. Her guests were: Mesdames 
Esther Birdsall Darling, Theodore Bonnet, 
R. U. Smith, E. Terry, Clay M. Greene, 
Henry Gray. Alexander de Bretteville, Frank 
Wakefield. W. B. Bonfils, Japhet Lindeberg, 
James Reid, Christopher Chinn, Geraldine 
Storey, Miss Margaret Fairman. Miss de 
Bretteville. 

Miss Helen Wollworth entertained for 
Mrs. Eleanor Martin and Mrs. Frank P. 
Helm. Other hostesses included: Mesdames 
Richie Dunn, Ross Ambler Curran, Walter 
Hobart, D. C. Jackling. William Glassford, 
Frederick Hussey. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John Magee, Mrs. George 
Howard and Mrs. Ralph Sanger, all of New 
York, are being entertained every day of 
their stay in San Francisco. Mr. and Mrs. 
William H. Crocker gave a dinner at Bur- 
lingame on Saturday evening for the visitors 
and Mr. and Mrs. William B. Bourn gave a 
dinner on Sunday evening. Mr. and Mrs. 
Daniel C. Jackling and Mr. and Mrs. George 
Pope are others who have entertained them. 

— Mrs. Georges de Latour was the hostess 
at a luncheon Monday at her home at which 
she entertained: Mesdames Henry T. Scott, 
J. Downey Harvey, Robert Oxnard, Richard 
Sprague, Russell Wilson, Frank Johnson, 
Rennie P. Schwerin, Miss Jennie Blair. 

—Mrs. Albert Dibblee of Ross will give a 
luncheon at the Town and Country Club for 
Miss Hannah Hobart on Wednesday. 

— Three of the most attractive girls of the 
east bay set were guests of honor at a de- 
lightful dinner dance given on Saturday 
evening by Mr. and Mrs. William Thornton 
White at the Claremont Country Club. Miss 
Laura Miller, one of the season's debutantes; 
Miss Virginia Smith, the fiancee of Monroe 
Greenwood, and Miss Dorothy Cawston, who 
has announced her engagement to Edward 
Fennon, were the complimented guests. 

— Mrs. Peter Cook, Jr., entertained at 
luncheon in the Palm court of the Palace 
Hotel Friday afternoon, complimenting Miss 
Lucretia McNear, whose marriage to Wil- 
liam Thomas was a social event on Tuesday. 



— Mrs. George Howard of Washington, 
who is visiting Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Jack- 
ling, was the guest for whom Mrs. Henry 
Foster Dutton gave a luncheon at the St. 
Francis. Also in the party were Mrs. Jack- 
ling, Mrs. George Pope, Mrs. Ross Ambler 
Curran, Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker. 
Mrs. Herbert Moffitt, Mrs. Richard McCreery 
and several others. 

— Mrs. John G. Sutton gave a luncheon 
and bridge party at the San Francisco Golf 
and Country Club. Among the guests were 
Mrs. Andrew Welch, Mrs. Alexander Field, 
Mrs. Alexander Keyes, Mrs. Charles K. Har- 
ley, Mrs. Frank Dray, Mrs. Edward Erie 
Brownell, Mrs. Silas Palmer, Mrs. Arthur 
Sharp. Mrs. George Forderer and Mrs. How- 
ard Morrow. 

— Colonel and Mrs. Sydney Cloman enter- 
tainer twenty guests at luncheon on Sunday 
afternoon at the Burlingame Country Club, 
complimenting Captain and Mrs. Clifford 
Erskine Bolst. who are visiting in California 
from New York and London. 

— Last Sunday afternoon a large number 
of the polo enthusiasts of the peninsula 
gathered at the San Mateo Polo Club at in- 
formal affairs as usual. There were several 
parties at luncheon, one of which was given 
by Mr. and Mrs. Lewis G. Carpenter, who 
entertained as their guests Major and Mrs. 
William A. Robertson, Messrs. and Mesdames 
Cyril Tobin, Harold Chase of Santa Barbara, 
Mrs. Edward Carle of Santa Barbara, Messrs. 
George Moore, Richard M. Tobin and E. J. 
Boeseke. 

C. Frederick Kohl had another party at 
luncheon, and at the tea hour there were 
several other affairs. Mrs. Walter Hobart 



Tel. Market J915 



E>tnblislH-d IMS.'. 



San Francisco Plating Works 

Gold. Silver. Nickel, Copper and Brasi Plating 

Work of every description plau-d 

Silver Plated Copper Mining Plates for Saving Gold 

1349-51 Mission Slreet 

Between 9th and 10th San Francisco. Cal. 











Buy With Discrimination 

There never was a time when 
it was so necessary to "shop," 
to discriminate between the 
fly-by-night exploiter of doubt- 
ful bargains and the reputable 
houses whose announcements 
are backed by demonstrated 
integrity and progressive poli- 
cies of merchandising. 

Willard's 

Women 's and Misses 'Apparel 

Geary Street 

Between Grant and Stockton 











February 26. 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



was hostess at tea, and among her guests 
was Miss Marion Hollins, who is returning 
to her home in New York after a visit in 
California. Miss Hollins will return to Cali- 
fornia in the near future to supervise the 
building of her forest at Pebble Beach. The 
others at the tea were Mesdames Frederick 
Hussey. William Devereaux and Robert 
Hayne. 

In the evening Mrs. Erskine de Guigne 
assembled a number of friends at dinner at 
the Polo Club, and the party included Mr. 
and Mrs. J. Frank Judge, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Walker Salisbury, Mr. Russell Wilson, Dr. 
Tracy Russell and Major Archibald M. John- 
son. 

— Mrs. Joseph Bryant Crockett enter- 
tained informally at luncheon at the Hotel 
St. Francis Thursday afternoon. 

— Mrs. Florence Porter Pfingst gave a 
dinner party a few evenings ago at the Fair- 
mont and had as her guests Mr. and Mrs. 
Jean St. Cyr, Mr. and Mrs. Rennie P. 
Scherwin, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch, Cap- 
tain and Mrs. Henry B. Price, Commander 
Robert Lopez and General George Barnett. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch gave a 
dinner Friday evening and later took their 
guests to the Russian ballet. Mr. and Mrs. 
Augustus Taylor and Mrs. Butler Breeden 
were among those in the party. 

— Colonel and Mrs. Thomas G. Pearce 
gave a dinner Saturday evening at their 
home in the Presidio. The guests were Col- 
onel and Mrs. Guy Carleton, Colonel and 
Mrs. E. V. Smith, Colonel and Mrs. Hanna, 
Colonel Jones and Colonel Louis Chappelear. 

— Mrs. Hoyt Perry gave a tea at her home 
in Jackson street. She recently returned 
from the East, where she spent the early 
winter. Mrs. Horace Van Sicklin and Mrs. 
George Monroe Pinckard presided at the 
tea table. 

— In honor of Mrs. Benjamin Edger. who, 
with her husband. Major Edger, has come 
to San Francisco to make her home, Mrs. 
Wallace Bertholf entertained informally at 
tea at her home several days ago. Some of 
those asked to greet the guest of honor, who 
is the former Miss Edith Downing, were: 
Mesdames Alfred Ghirardelli, Edmund Short- 
lidge. Aylett Cotton, William Shea. William 
P. Humphreys, Delmar Clinton and John 
Lewis; Misses Johanna Volkmann and Elsa 
Schilling. Major and Mrs. Edger are visit- 
ing at the 0. P. Downing home on Vallejo 
street. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edward Bosqui and Miss 
Marian Baker went to their ranch at Las 
Vegas for the holidays, and will return to 
San Francisco the last of the week. 

— Among the prominent parties which 
celebrated Washington's birthday at Del 
Monte were Mrs. C. T. Crocker and party. 
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Pope and party, 
Mr. Francis Carolan. Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph 



Spreckles, H. C. Holmes and party, Phil 
O'Connell, Mr. and Mrs. H. Van Sicklen, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Cushing, Mr. and Mrs. 
M. R. Higgins, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Haviside, 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Adler, Mr. and Mrs. D. C. 
Jackling, Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron, Mr. 
and Mrs. C. J. Okell and Mr. and Mrs. C. 0. 
G. Miller. 

— Dr. Harry Tevis returned a few days 
ago from New York, where he spent several 
weeks with his sister, Mrs. Frederick W. 
Sharon. Dr. Tevis also went to Havana and 
Florida while he was away. 

Mrs. Sharon, who has spent the winter in 
New York, will return to San Francisco in 
the early summer and will pass a few months 
at the Palace. 

— Mrs. Mark Requa and Miss Alice 
Requa are visiting Mrs. Isaac Requa in Pied- 
mont. They will be there the remainder of 
the winter. Mrs. and Miss Requa came 
West from New York before Christmas and 
visited the eldest daughter in the family, 
Mrs. John Newton Russell, Jr., in Los An- 
geles. 

— Miss Elizabeth Adams is visiting Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter Hobart and the Misses 
Hobart at San Mateo. Her sister. Miss Ellita 
Adams, is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Seward 
McNear and Miss Amanda McNear at their 
home in Vallejo street. The Misses Adams 
and their mother, Mrs. Edson Adams, re- 
turned several days ago from the East, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Adams are at the Hotel Oak- 
land. They will soon move into their home 
in Piedmont, which they have not occupied 
for some time. 

— Miss Mary Elena Macondray. who will 
be married to Herman Phleger in Palo Alto 
the first week in April, will be the house 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Madison 
during the coming week. 



A CONTINUOUS SUCCESSION OF 
NOVELTIES 

Such might be the title of the varied enter- 
tainment numbers offered in the attractive 
environment of Techau Tavern. The Three 
White Kuhns and Mary, in Musical Melodies, 
the Big Revue of Artists, with their many 
colorful numbers: Lucky Dances with Miss 
Savior's Chocolates and Murad Cigarettes in 
Large Boxes, without competition to the 
Lucky Patrons, and if this was not enough 
to attract the many patrons who throng this 
famous establishment, the new policy of all 
cover charges suspended, except on the 
week-ends and holidays, and the regular 



luncheon reduced from 95 cents to 85 cents, 
with a splendid table d'hote dinner in seven 
courses for $1.75, and with the famous 
dance orchestra, headed by Elliston R. 
Ames, and their merry melodies, it is small 
wonder that it is desirable to make reserva- 
tions or come early when one decides to dine 
or drop in for a light supper after theater. 



PROSPERITY CERTAIN 

If the United States do not enjoy renewed 
prosperity in 1921, then all signs must fail. 
The leading words of the business com- 
munity are "Expect Prosperity." There are 
several reasons for it. Business men 
throughout the country are going to have a 
greater confidence in the Government, with 
the reins in the hands of men possessed of 
the best brains in the country. 

Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

Gus' Fashion 

The MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT 

65 Post Street. Near Market Street. 
Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners. 

FISH AND CAME A SPECIALTY 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 
Offices— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



PROMPT SERVICE 

i» a feature of our daily luncheon. You can 
dine here in 30 minutes or leu if you with 

SPECIAL LUNCHEON. $1.00 

OR SHORT ORDERS A LA CARTE 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNER. $1.75 

Sunday and Week Days 

DANCING 

6 TO 9 EVERY EVENINC 

BERGEZ-FRANK S 

Old P00DLE-D0G Co. 

421 BUSH STREET. ABOVE KEARNY 
Phone Douglas 2411 



Moat Pleasant Time of the Year at 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

To Enjoy Sports and Social Pleasures 
CARL S. STANLEY MANAGER 




Would You Preserve Tour Lustrous Eyes? 

Use Murine Eye Remedy 



9AL-VE 



No Dressing Table Complete Without 
Murine As An Eye Tonic 



LIQUID 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 26, 1921 



^//brnohih 




Henry Ford's Activities 

Henry Ford's journalistic interests do not 
appear to reduce his activities in the auto- 
mobile business. Last week there was an 
exhibition of Fords in New York, to signalize 
the opening of the new Ford Service build- 
ing, close to the Queensboro Plaza, which 
building has just been completed. It covers 
a plot 200 by 250 feet and in ground area 
is one of the largest industrial plants in that 
borough. Henry Ford has taken a personal 
interest in the new structure and it embodies 
in its time-saving machinery, by which cars 
may be quickly repaired, many ideas sug- 
gested by that remarkably practical designer. 

There are facilities for repairing 125 cars 
at one time, and all parts used in the cars 
will be found there. The building, with the 
land, exceeding one acre, represents a cost of 
more than 500,000. Henry Hellman, who 
had been in the Ford Detroit factory for 
many years, is in charge of the service sta- 
tion and several assistants from the Detroit 
factory are with him. 

* * * 

W. L. Hughsons' Important Change 

In San Francisco the fine new building, 
corner of Eleventh and Market streets (op- 
posite Van Ness avenue) , is progressing with 
great speed. It is a solid four-story concrete 
structure, and will be an admirable building 
for auto purposes. Experienced realtors ex- 
pect Market and Eleventh to be the center 
of the auto business in a very short time. 
Business is running in that direction and as 
San Francisco can expand only southward, 
the rapid improvement of Market street is 
only a matter of a short time. 

The new building at Market and Eleventh 
street has a large sign on it announcing that 
it is "The Ford Corner," and will be occupied 
by the Wm. L. Hughson Co. That firm is 
well and favorably known in the auto busi- 
ness in California. They are located at the 
corner of Van Ness avenue and Geary street 
at present, but "To Let" signs are already 
.posted, as the firm will occupy its new Mar- 
ket street building on May 1st. The change 
is one of great interest to automobile people, 
as the clustering of important auto concerns 
near the head of Van Ness avenue are very 
significant. 

Across the street from Wm. L. Hughson & 
Co.'s new location the White Company is 
already located. Several important tire con- 



cerns are clustered around, and on the north 
side of Market street, west of Van Ness ave- 
nue, the Clydesdale Motor Truck people oc- 
cupy a large new concrete building. 

Busted Property Owners 

The motor-car business — and particularly 
motor truck — would already be concentrated 
more noticeably on upper Market street, but 
for the apathy of property owners there, most 
of whom are not in financial condition to 
build. Several valuable holdings represent 
estates of dead pioneers, and the heirs are 
either at law, or more anxious to turn their 
inheritances into cash, than to improve the 
city. Those people are being taxed heavily, 
and before long must be eliminated. More 
progressive owners will erect buildings, suit- 
able for the main thoroughfare of San Fran- 
cisco. It is announced already that a few 
upper Market street property owners have 
decided to accept reasonable offers and get 
out. Most of them have been refusing good 
offers, though unable to make use of their 
holdings. One large owner who got cinched 
by the drop in rice is said to be considering 
the immediate sale of a block on Market 
street west of Van Ness avenue, as the banks 
are urging him to cash in. 

The next six months or a year may witness 
a scramble amongst automobile firms for 
Market street locations. 

The Chicago Exhibition 

Several shades of more brilliant coloring 
in the cars, not a little difference in the com- 
position of the displays, and the vastly dif- 
ferent atmosphere of Chicago, combined to 
render the twenty-first national show in Chi- 
cago an entirely different, and, in its own 
way, more cheering exhibition than that at 
New York. For it is a fact that brightly 
colored show cars are a material aid in add- 
ing to the gala effect of the show. Reds, 
blues, greens and grays may not be the most 
serviceable or popular hues on the highway. 



but they are undoubtedly a big booster of 
show enthusiasm. 

Show lecturers were more numerous than 
in New York, but not so much in evidence as 
in Chicago in former yeras. For the most 
part only informal talks were given, but at 
the Paige-Detroit stand an exception was 
made, not one, but three lecturers, holding 
the boards. Each of these men talked upon 
some definite phase of the car or its use, and 
the succession of short talks proved highly 
successful in holding visitors around the ex- 
hibit. 

As to the general character of the exhibits 
there was little difference between the second 
of the two national shows and the first. In 
fact the principal distinction was in the fin- 
ish of the show cars of such exhibits as were 
not transferred bodily from one to the other. 
Touring cars were displayed in practically all 
cases. Roadsters almost universally. Where 
the booths were large enough to accommo- 
date four cars, these were of the touring, 
roadster, sedan and coupe varieties, and 
stock types. If there was room for an addi- 
tional car, it might be a special body job, 
but was more apt to be a stock car specially 
equipped. 

Novelties in Closed Can 

At the Chicago show this year more nov- 
elty was displayed in closed than in open 
cars, perhaps because the higher prices which 
they bring command a wider range of ma- 
terials and equipment, perhaps because the 
anticipated increase in demand for cars of 
this class has stimulated the manufacturers 
to redoubled efforts at producing attractive 
values. At all events in closed cars and 
their equipment a good deal more seems to 
have been done since last year than in a 
majority of the standard open cars. 

Touching on comparatively minor details 
first, there is the question of the visor over 
the front. This has been added in a dozen 
or more cases, as in the case of the Standard 
Eight, Maxwell, Apperson, Columbia, and 
Jordan two-passenger landaulet. The method 
of mounting varies considerably, and in but 
two instances, recalled at the moment, was 
it shown in adjustable form. This, however, 
is a useful feature. 

Windshield Cleaners 

Windshield cleaners were standard equip- 
ment on a good many closed cars at the Chi- 
cago show this year, though not all. The 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



February 26, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



reason for this, of course, is the employment 
of some form of double front as a means of 
obtaining clear vision when heading into bad 
weather. Perhaps the simplest device look- 
ing into this direction is the employment of 
an extra upper panel to the windshield 
hinged at the top and swinging outward. 
This has somewhat the same effect as a visor, 
and when in use is adjusted to obtain a line 
of sight beneath it. A second form is the 
solid outer shield of two panels with a par- 
tial inner shield. This depends on the crea- 
tion of an air cushion between the glasses, 
or some sort of back draft created by the 
movement of the car, to prevent rain or 
snow from diving in between the upper and 
lower glasses, at the same time permitting 
the driver to peer out between them. Still 
another type is the practically complete dou- 
ble front, which is adjustable in so many 
different ways that the user has a wide lati- 
tude. 

Minor Changes 

Quite a number of cars at the Chicago 
show had ventilating traps in the roof. Heat- 
ing devices for closed cars were more elabo- 
rate than formerly. Electric cigar-lighters 
were more generally included in the standard 
equipment than flower vases — perhaps a con- 
cession to universal suffrage. 

Changes in Sedans 

Judging by the exhibits at both the New 
York and the Chicago show there has been 
practical elimination of the single door sedan 
with divided front seats and an aisleway be- 
tween. The new style is the four-door sedan 
with fixed cross seat in front. This is a less 
expensive body to build, a more rigid and 
satisfactory body in service, and in general 
a far more comfortable one to ride in. 
Lengthened out, this becomes a seven-pas- 
senger job. Shortened up and narrowed in, 
it becomes the four-passenger sport sedan 
seen only on a few of the stands, where it 
was exhibited by makers of the higher-priced 
and more exclusive cars. 

Marmon Shows Stock Chassis 

Everybody at the show noticed the Mar- 
mon miniature models which attracted so 
much attention in New York, and turned 
from them to the standard cars which 
formed the background of the miniature ex- 
hibit. A standard chassis — not a special 
exhibit, but a regular stock chassis — was, in 
a sense, a welcome diversion from the long 
line of exhibition models. The public is tir- 
ing of the endless succession of these running 
back into show history, and so is the trade. 
On the other hand, the public generally is 
unfamiliar with what a chassis looks like. It 
goes to the shows to find out. and the way 
visitors filtered back into the Marmon booth 
to examine the unique construction of that 
machine proved the point. 



Paying His Way? 

In view of the large expenditures which 
are planned for highway improvement, it is 
interesting to note whether or not the motor 
vehicle owner is .paying a fair amount for 
the use of the roads which are available at 
the present time. In this connection, a well- 
known authority in a recent interview ex- 
pressed the opinion that the motor vehicle 
owner is certainly paying in full for the use 
of the roads and gave some interesting fig- 
ures to prove his contention. 

He says, "Motor vehicle owners in 1918 
paid $50,000,000 in automobile license fees 
to the various states. Including personal 
property taxes levied on cars in some states, 
excise and local charges, it is estimated that 
car owners paid no less than $150,000,000. 
In addition, motor vehicle manufacturers 
paid $33,000,000 in taxes to the Federal 
Government. This is a total of about $25 
for every car built. Out of 2,500,000 miles 
of highway in the United States, only 6,250 
are equal to the demands of heavy duty traf- 
fic. Motor vehicles, therefore, pay a total 
sum amounting to $75 per mile for every 
mile of highway in the United States, im- 
proved or unimproved. For every mile capa- 
ble of carrying heavy duty motor traffic 
motor vehicles pay yearly a sum equal to 
$24,000 per mile." 

* * * 

F. A. Babcock, Inventor of Electric 
Automobile, Dies 

Funeral services for Frank A. Babcock, 
the inventor of the electric automobile, were 
held in Buffalo February 2. Mr. Babcock 
was ill at his home for some time before his 
death, which was caused by a complication 
of diseases. 



While head of the Babcock Carriage Co. 
Mr. Babcock conceived the idea that a self- 
propelled vehicle could be constructed to be 
operated by electricity. He organized the 
Babcock Electric Carriage Company and a 
Buffalo factory was established. This firm 
enjoyed a flourishing business for a number 
of years, but with the rapid advancement of 
the gasoline car its business declined and the 
firm was finally dissolved. 

Hostile Taxation 

"Heavy motor trucks will be taxed off the 
roads," under the plan of legislation being 
drafted in New York to meet the recommen- 
dations of Governor Miller's annual message. 
No secret is made of the intention of the 
legislation, the lawmakers taking the view 
that the use of heavy trucks imposes pro- 
hibitive upkeep costs, and that the best way 
to check this is to tax the heavy vehicles 
out of existence. 

Under the proposed legislation annual fees 
of $500 are fixed for trucks of 5-ton carrying 
capacity; $600 for 6-ton; $700 for 7-ton, 
and $800 for 8-ton. Trucks of less than 5- 
ton capacity would be permitted to operate 
for from $50 to $90 a year. 



Remedy for Door Rattle 

Rattling doors are very annoying and this 
trouble is not always confined to the low- 
priced motor car. A simple remedy is to 
pad out the hinges or catches with thin rub- 
ber sheeting. If the doors jam, graphite 
their engaging faces or file down the high 
spots. The cause of the doors seizing is gen- 
erally due to the body settling. 



World's Most Beautiful 

AUTO SHOW 



February 19th to 26th 

{INCH 3T\ 

Exposition Auditorium -:- San Francisco 



>< >>♦>»>*>*♦♦>><»>>•<>»» » < 




J. B. CROWE 

3652 GEARY, at 1st Ave. 1 OSS Post St.. at Polk 

GLASS OF ALL KINDS 



GLAZING 

PHONE FRANKLIN "«5 



BEVELING 

AUTO Bl l 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 26, 1921 




PLyEASURE>'S WAND 



Orpheum's Rich Bill 

This "Revue" fever seems to be seizing 
everybody. Annette Kellerman "Herself" 
is not immune. With a strong company 
Miss Kellerman gives a very lively and 
amusing, as well as picturesque, act. Sur- 
rounded as her revue is by vaudeville artists 
of distinction in their different lines, by the 
best dancers, the best singers and the best 
humorists, she still stands out prominently 
and popularly, and it must be a feeling of 
intense gratification that fills her as she sees 
the curtain fall between her and her wildly 
enthusiastic audience. 



'Obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

symphony will undoubtedly be a revelation 
to symphony patrons in its demonstration of 
the remarkable effects obtainable in the mod- 
ern orchestra, for the composer has left noth- 
ing undone to give an impression of a holi- 
day in Amsterdam. The holiday spirit is 
strikingly portrayed even to the extent of a 
street car, hand organ, skyrockets and other 
noises characteristic of a Dutch kermes. The 
"Vaegtervise" is a fantasy on Danish folk- 
songs; also a remarkably characteristic com- 




Alcazar's Funny Farce 

"No More Blondes," but Brunetto is with 
us still. As the swaggering bully of a big 
brother of the heroine he gives a good per- 
formance. Miss Harvey wears again the 
black wig, and one can but deplore the 
exigencies of a play requiring that. Dudley 
Ayers was not a bit heroic, and that was an 
amusing relief. A clever bit of acting was 
done by Charles Yule as the butler. Nina 
Guilbert made a hit in the part of a pert 
French maid. Emily Pinter and Ben Erway 
had parts well suited to them. Al Cunning- 
ham was a magnificent prize fighter, and 
Anna MacNaughton a fascinating farcical 
housekeeper. The play is bright and laugh- 
able, but not by any means the best of the 
season. 



Columbia 

It looks as though May Robson in Alan 
Dale's comedy, "Nobody's Fool," could fill 
the Columbia for many weeks to comt, but 
it gives place on Monday to "The Sweet- 
heart Shop," a popular musical show, to 
which the many lovers of that form of en- 
tertainment are eagerly looking forward. 



Barrie Plays at The Maitland 

"Alice-sit-by-the-fire" in the capable 
hands of the Maitland players affords an 
evening of delightful entertainment. Mr. 
Maitland as Colonel Grey gave an excellent 
performance, and Miss Morris does well as 
Alice. The company has warmed up to its 
work and every week brings better results at 
the artistic little theatre. 



Symphony Orchestra at Curran Theatre 

At Sunday afternoon's concert in the Cur- 
ran theatre by the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra a most interesting program will be 
presented, containing two works to be played 
for the first time in America — the "Amster- 
dam" symphony of Cornells Dopper, and 
Paul Juon's "Vaegtervise." The Dopper 



position. The program will open with the 
"Faust Overture" of Wagner. 

The last popular concert of the season will 
be given on the following Sunday afternoon, 
March 6, with an unusually attractive pro- 
gram of favorite light classics, the principal 
numbers being Dohanyi's Suite, Opus 19, 
the Flying Dutchman overture of Wagner, 
and "Finlandia" of Sibelius. Other shorter 
compositions will be the Dance of the Happy 
Spirits from Gluck's "Orpheus," Bach's Air 




Versatile and Beauteous Annette Kellerman is Displaying Her Accomplishments at 
the Orpheum /Von> in a Corgeous Fashion Revue 



February 26, 1921 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



for G String, the Pizzicati from "Sylvia" of 
Delibes, the dainty "Loin du Bal" of Gillet 
and Chabrier's rhapsody, "Espana." 



Orpheum's New Attractions 

Annette Kellerman, Orpheum star of this 
week, will be seen Sunday in the second edi- 
tion of her revue, which is different from the 
act she is offering this week. 

The versatile athletic star will appear for 
the first time in a gorgeous imported fashion 
display designed from- Europe's most modern 
modes after her own inspirations. This 
marks a new era in the career of Kellerman, 
which is to establish her as the idol of the 
feminine social contingent. 

Albertina Rasch, notable ballerina, and 
company of girls, as well as the travesty 
comedian, Tom Duray, in "For Pity's Sake," 
are on the new bill with many other stars of 
vaudeville. 



APPEAL FOR SYMPHONY FUNDS 

Musical San Francisco — and who amongst 
us is not a lover of delightful music? — will 
have ample cause for regret if anything 
should interfere with the series of symphony 
concerts, under Alfred Hertz, that have af- 
forded our community such pleasure, and 
done so much to elevate the popular taste 
for art. 

At the popular concert in the Curran 
theatre last Sunday President McFCee of the 
Musical Society took advantage of an inter- 
lude to speak a few earnest words on the 
financial features of the symphony program. 
It is to be hoped his appeal may have a 
good effect, for the task of financing our 
magnificent symphony orchestra is no light 
task. It calls for generous contributions 
from the music lovers of San Francisco. 
From the principal standpoint, however, the 
money has a great business value, as a fine 
symphony orchestra is a powerful attraction 
to visitors of the best class. 

At Sunday's popular concert in the Curran 
theatre Horace Britt was the soloist, offering 
three cello numbers, which were played 
with exquisite taste and perfect mastery of 
his instrument — Faure's "Romance," "The 
Swan" of Saint-Saens, and Glazounow's 
Espagnole. The principal orchestral items 
were Grieg's second Peer Gynt Suite, the 
Theme with Variations from Tschaikowsky's 
Third Suite, and two ballet numbers from 
Saint-Saens' Samson and Delilah. Other 
numbers listed were Lassen's Festival Over- 
ture, Gounod's Funeral March of a Marion- 
ette, the Norwegian Wedding Procession of 



Grieg, the Valse Triste of Sibelius and 
Johann Strauss' Perpetuum Mobile. It was 
a program and a performance to be remem- 
bered with pleasure. 



BAY OF NAPLES' RIVAL 

These glorious days, when guests in the 
splendid Fairmont Hotel look out across the 
Bay of San Francisco, they see an expanse 
of blue water which reminds them that 
Americans had better see America first. Why 
travel to the Mediterranean to see the beau- 




1 - T <&H>W B v(Wxj _. r " 

Next Week— Starting Sunday 

Second and Final Week of 

Annette Kellerman 

In a New and Gorgeous Act 

M OODY A DUNCAN I FAULKNER & CO. 

'FOR PITY'S SAKE" with 

Tom Duray 



Hampton & Blake 



BURKE & BETTY 



DELMORE & LEE 



Albertina Rasch 

In Dances from Famous Ballets 



Matinees— '25c to $1.00 Evenings— 25c to tl.so 

MATINEE DAILY'— Phone Douglas 70 

Scalpers' Tickets Not Honored 



SYmphMY 

ORCHESTRA 

Alfred Hertz Conductor. 

CONCERT SUNDAY 

CURRAN THEATRE -:- 2:45 P. M. 

PROGRAM 

A Faust Overture Warner 

Vaeglervise Paul fuon 

(First lime in America) 

Amsterdam Symphony Cornells Dopper 

(First lime in America) 

Prices: 50c lo $1: Boxes and Loges, $1 SO. 

Sunday, March (\ Last "Pop" Concert 



USE 

Associated Products 

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Associated Oil Company 



Sharon Bldg. 



San F 



an t rancisco 



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San Francisco 

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Leather Cone Clutch Facing 
Leather Fan Belts snd Belting 
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Facto ry Rtprtuntalicts and Distributors for EMSCO PRODUCTS 



tiful Bay of Naples, until one has seen the 
more beautiful Bay of San Francisco, with 
an incomparable panorama of hills and val- 
leys, from the many points of vantage that 
the Fairmont Hotel affords? 



An Ounce of Prevention is 
Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where - regret. 

Let our expert automobile electricians 
inspect your starting, lighting and 
ignition systems regularly. It's the best 
insurance against a breakdown at an 
important moment. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

MASTER oAUTOMOBILE ELECTRICIANS 
955 Post Street SAN FRANCISCO 



PYR0-V0ID 

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- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satitfoction Guarantetd or Monry Rrfunded 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

90S Market Street, at Powell 
San Francisco 

Dept. N. L. Established 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



Ramona Grill 

172 ELLIS STREET 

Breakfast 50 and 75 cents 

Served from 7 a. m. to 2 p. m. 
Lunch .... 60 cents 

Dinner Si. 00 

Served from 5 to 8 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays J1.25 



THE BEST THE MARKET AFFORDS 

•fVJM C—tmt TMn)trfmth Sn-sW 
A PLACE OF BEFINEMENT 

CAFE RAMONA 

1-2 ELLIS STREET 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 26, 1921 



Shakespeare Discredited 



THAT Shakespeare did not write the 
plays attributed to him, is the surmise 
of Colonel Henry Watterson, whom the 
American public has usually associated with 
political problems, instead of literary discus- 
sions. The Colonel has decided — to his own 
satisfaction — that the real author of "Shake- 
spearian" dramas was neither Shakespeare 
nor Bacon, bul Kit Marlowe, who was killed 
in a tavern brawl in 1593. 

The killing of an author is not much to 
stand in the way of a Kentucky colonel, so 
"Massah" Watterson transports the slain 
dramatist (revived, of course) over to 
France, where he continued his literary la- 
bors, and sent back across the channel to 
Shakespeare the plays that have made the 
Stratford poet so illustrious. 

No one whispered this hypothesis in the 
Colonel's ear. He just naturally hit on it, 
all by himself; and the New York Times, 
famous authority on matters literary, asks 
whether "prohibition can be safely endured 
on top of a lifetime of politics?" Evidently 
not. 

The comments of the Times on Colonel 
Watterson's pipe-dream are worth quotation, 
as they deal with some points often advanced 
by people desirous of discrediting Shakes- 
peare — his obscure start in London as a 
horseboy, his signatures that show he was 
illiterate and his non-production of plays in 
the twelve years he survived at Stratford 
after he retired from theatrical life when 40. 
The Times shows that far from remaining 
silent after 1604, when he was 40 years old, 
Shakespeare wrote several of his strongest 
plays — at least ten. Among these were: 
"Macbeth" (1606), "Lear" (1607), "An- 
tony and Cleopatra" (1608), "Coriolanus" 
(1609), "Cymbeline" (1610), "The Winter's 
Tale" (1611), and "The Tempest" (1611). 
In the case of many of these plays internal 
evidence — contemporary allusions and the 
like — make it impossible that they should 
have been written before 1604. 

To Colonel Watterson it meant little that 
Ben Jonson, famous contemporary of Shakes- 
peare, had written of the latter as "Sweet 
Will." "Merely an attestation," declares the 
Colonel, "that he was a good fellow, popular 
among his associates." 

"But," demands the Times, "what does it 
show that Ben Jonson wrote the famous 
poem affixed to the First Folio, which is still 
perhaps the supreme critical estimate of the 
greatness of the plays, as it is irrefutable evi- 
dence that Shakespeare wrote them?" 

Commenting on Colonel Watterson's argu- 
ment of Shakespeare's illiteracy by the sig- 
natures he left, the Times remarks: 



"As for those live signatures, three of them 
are on Shakespeare's will and are indeed 
somewhat shaky. They may well have been ; 
for, according to Sir Sidney Lee, at the time 
they were penned in March, 1616, 'Shakes- 
peare's health was failing.' The seventeenth 
century vicar of Stratford, John Ward, tells 
a more circumstantial story. Shakespeare 
'had a merry meeting' with his fellow-poets. 
Drayton and Ben Jonson, and 'itt seems 
drank too hard, for Shakespeare died of a 
feavour there contracted.' In any case shaky 
penmanship within a few weeks of a tes- 
tator's death needs no explanation. That his 
hand was 'illiterate' is demonstrably untrue. 
Two of the five signatures are attached to 
legal documents of the year 1612-13 and are 
models of penmanship. It is true that all 
five are written in antique script, which is as 
different from modern script as black-letter 
type is from Roman; but of their kind they 
are all thoroughly literate." 



WHAT COMES OF DEMAGOGUERY 

Seattle is up against it. In fact, the city 
has been up against it since it took over the 
local railway lines of the Puget Sound Trac- 
tion, Light & Power Company a year ago. 
The privately owned road was up against it 
before that. Denied adequate measures of 
relief, the owners sold out to the city, then 
under Ole Hanson as mayor. Ole Hanson 
was for municipal ownership then. He has 
since seen a great light, but that doesn't help 
Seattle now, says the Electric Railway Jour- 
nal. 

The story is an interesting one and has 
many angles. In fact, it has too many an- 
gles and lessons to be dealt with adequately 
except at considerable length. One series of 
facts, however, stands out in bold relief. 
The city now is. $500,000 behind in its oper- 
ation of the municipal railway; at the end 
of 1921, if the present fare is continued, 
there will be an estimated deficit of $1,610,- 
452. Employes are being paid by warrants 
salable now at a discount or payable at some 
indefinite future date when the city has suffi- 
cient money to meet them. The Seattle ticket 
fare is now 6J4 cents. The cash fare is 10 
cents. The latest proposal is to make the 
ticket fare 8 1/3 cents. If that is done and 
traffic remains constant it is estimated — esti- 
mated, mind you — that it will take two years 
to wipe out the present deficit. 

Seattle was considerably a war bride. The 
heavy hand of the post-war period has now 
descended upon it. The city is slowing up. 
Estimates based on the future are decidedly 
dangerous. Therefore, Mayor Caldwell has 
preached caution. He is not so sure that 



the panacea for Seattle's poor showing is in 
advancing the fares. In consequence of this 
and other happenings the matter of an in- 
crease has gone over for a time. 

The lesson of Seattle's failure with mu- 
nicipal ownership and operation is plain to 
other cities. Those disposed to disregard it 
can hardly expect to escape a similar experi- 
ence. 



MUST WE FIGHT JAPAN? 

A book which will be read with great in- 
terest on the Pacific Coast is "Must We Fight 
Japan?" by Walter B. Pitkin, just published 
by the Century Co., New York. 

The author is associate professor of phil- 
osophy at Columbia University. 

This is an astounding book, but not a 
book of propaganda or sensationalism; it is 
the result of wide and careful investigation 
and of much calm, close thinking by a man 
eminently equipped to sift evidence and dis- 
cover the truth. Briefly, it is a book wherein 
is collected the facts of the Japanese-Amer- 
ican case, with special reference to our Pa- 
cific Coast and to Japan's Asiatic neighbors. 
It sets down the things that point toward a 
stupendous war with Japan as the result of 
American and Japanese conflicting interests; 
and it sets down the things that may prevent 
a war and force the two counrties to find a 
basis of agreement. 

The author's style is vivid, dramatic and 
compelling. 

It is a bulky volume, 12 mo., with 528 
pages, including maps, charts and index. 



AMERICAN RED CROSS WORK 

The scope of the Civilian Relief Work of 
the Red Cross is perhaps not fully appre- 
ciated, though several volumes descriptive of 
it have been published. A new volume by 
Fisher Ames, Jr., "American Red Cross Work 
Amongst the French People," concludes the 
series. 

This volume indicates what was done in 
this line in France alone. The story is an 
interesting one and the impression which it 
conveys of the tremendous activities of the 
Red Cross in this field of endeavor will come 
as a great surprise to many people. 

This volume concludes the splendid series 
issued under the auspices of the Red Cross, 
to give the American people an adequate 
idea of the wonderful work which their dol- 
lars did in France through the Red Cross 
Organization. 

Macmillan & Company, New York, are the 
publishers. 



GONE ARE THE DAYS 

"Prohibition hit the tin industry an awlul 
wallop." 

"All you needed for a good time in the 
old days was a tin bucket and tin cints." — 
Notre Dame Juggler. 



YssssssMsssswssssssss//Mrzrs/rsMssmrss^^^ 



Who Framed This Up? 

" Governor Johnson's 1915 

Budget for two years was - - $36,000,000 
"Governor Stephen's 1921 

Budget for two years is - - $81,000,000 

An Increase of $45,000,000 

What Does This Mean? 

It Represents an Increase Equal to: 

$22,500,000 for each year. 
$1,875,000 for each month of two yaars. 
$6 1 ,643 for each day of two years. 
$2,568 for each hour of two years. 
$42.80 for each minute of two years. 

Get This Straight! 

$42.80 a minute INCREASE 

Does it look right ? 
Does it look reasonable? 
Do you want to pay it? 

Support your legislator in demanding that 
the State live within its income or show why! 

TAX INVESTIGATION AND ECONOMY LEAGUE 

HERBERT W. CLARK. Preud? nt W. V. HILL. StmUrr 

1504 Humboldt Bank Building, San Francisco 

"The power to tax is the power to destroy" 



:'■ ..■■■..:...-■ :.: 1 , , - ,n , ,,... .. 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

1174 Phelan Building, San Francisco 

Has a practical system of placing manuscripts for 
publication, which is important to people who write. 
Frank criticism and competent revision are also 
available. 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORlE - McLAREN CO. 

FLORISTS. NURSERYMEN 

and 
LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Mateo 

Phone San Mateo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



CLOCK 
REPAIRING 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specialty 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

country 

We carry an attractive line of new clocks 

Work guaranteed in every detail 

CALIFORNIA CLOCK CO. 

418-19 Whitney Bldg. 133 Geary Street 

Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping. Manager 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 
Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capiial _ „ 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro 
pnetors _ 

Aggregate Assets, 30lh 
Sept. 1920 




$24,655,500.00 
. 16.750,000.00 

24,655,500.00 



$362,338,975.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

357 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji. Papua (New 
Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australasian Banking 
Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nal'l Bank 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK: 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francico, Cat. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Street. 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH..... Clement and 7lh Avenue 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Street. 

DECEMBER 51. 1920 

Assets __ _ _ $69,878,147.01 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits - „ _... 66,338.147.01 Reserve and Contingent Fund. _ 2,540,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund. $343,536.85 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER, Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL, Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Parlr.-Pre.idio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUCH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE 8. ORRICK. General Attorney. 






BOND DEPARTMENT 

TH£ ANGLO AND LONDON PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Su ter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 56C0 
San hrancisco. Call. 



RECOMMENDS 

IRRIGATION DISTRICT BONDS 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 
first morgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT. 

Yield from 6% to 634% 
Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



Ealabli.hed July 20 1856 



/ 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1921 



AND 

(California Aonrrtifirr 
$5.00 PER YEAR 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 

The Anglo & London Paris 
National Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 
At the Close of Business, February 21, 1921 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts, Less Rediscounts $ 43,644,732.87 

U. S. Bonds to Secure Circulation 3.95O.0OO.0O 

Other U. S. Bonds and Certificates 6.027.672.04 

Other Bonds 9.746.532.03 

Other Assets _ 1.550.510 .18 

Customers' Liability on Letters of Credit and Acceptances 12.354,955.56 

Commodity Drafts in Transit $ 6,166,054.97 

Cash and Sight Exchange 20.868.896.16 27.034.951.13 



$104,309.353 81 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock $ 5,000.000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 3.421. 171.01 

Circulation 3.883.600.00 

Letters of Credit. Domestic and Foreign and Acceptances 12.354.955.56 

Federal Reserve Bank (secured by Government Bonds) 4,712,000.00 

Other Liabilities 2,227,595.63 

Deposits 72.711 



OFF 
Herbert Fleishhacker, President 
Mortimer Fleishhacker, Vice-Pres. 
J, Inedlandcr, Vice-President 
C. V. Hunt, Vice-President 
Harry Coe. Vice-President 
W. E. Wilcox. Y.-Pres. and Cashier 
I W. Lilienthal Jr.. Vice-President 
Fred F. Ouer. Asst. Vice-President 
Victor Klinker, Asst. Vice-President 
J. S. Curran, Asst. Vice-President 



$104,309. is,, h| 
ICERS 

J. \V. Harrison. AmI. Vice President 
I R. Alexander. Asst Vice-President 
John Gayle Anderton. Asst. Cajliier 

and Secretary 
Geo. A. Van Smith. Asst. Cashier 
Eugene Plunkelt. Asst Cashier 
L. J. Aubert. Asst. Cashier 
F. J. Hoagland. Asst. Cashier 
V, R. PeohtOMti Asst. Cashier 



The Crocker National Bank 

of San Francisco 

Condition at Close of Business Feb. 21. 1921 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts $25,462,088.40 

U. S. Bonds and Certificates 5.469.734.81 

Other Bonds and Securities 1.233.241.72 

Capital Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 150.000.00 

Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit _ 1.288,836.95 

Cash and Sight Exchange 9.866.886.41 



$43,470,788.29 



LIABILITIES 
Capital $2,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 5.672.501.08 

Circulation 1.939.297.50 

Federal Reserve Bank 2.000.000.00 

Letter, of Credit 1.413.739.83 

Deposits <n 445.249.88 



$43,470,788.29 



Jas. J. F'agan. Wr-President. 

\\ - Grass, Vice-President. 

J. B. McCargar. Vice-President. 

William W Crocker. Vice-President. 

I G. Willi, Cashier. 

G. W. I.hncr. Assistant Cashier. 

B. D. Dean. Assistant Cashier. 



OFFICERS 
Wm. H. Crocker, President. 



J. M. Matter.. Assistant Cashier. 
D. J. Murphy. Assistant Cashier. 

V C. Read. Assistant Cashier. 
\V. D. Lux. Assistant Cashier. 

I A. Rounds, Assistant Cashier. 
H. C Simpson. Mgr. Foreign Dept- 

KM Ha.ghi. A»t. Mgr. Fn. Dept. 



C. Fens Baldwin. Auditor. 

RD OF DIRECTORS 

W m. H. Crocker George W. Scott A I Morrison 

Charles T. Crocker Chas. E. Green S. F. B. Morse 

Jas. J. Fagan \V Gregg I I' McCargar 

\\ illiam \V. Crocker. 




LET'S CATCH UP! 

San Francisco is the ONLY large city in the United States thit does net OWN its OWN water works. 

On March 8 next the voters will have an opportunity to vote on the purchase of the SPRING VALLEY system. It must be 
purchased; the longer we delay the more we will pay. 

1. The purchase will not add a cent to the tax rate. 

2. The Railroad Commission's valuation agrees with the Federal Court decisions that the price is right 

3. Improvements made by the company must be paid for in water rates. 

4. If you don't buy now your water rates MUST and WILL be increased. 

Own Your Own Water System— Vote YES March 8th 

Citizens' Conauttee of One Thousand. 




PHONE 

FRANKLIN 2960 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon II a. m. to 2 p. m. 

548 Sacramento St., cor. Leidetdorff 



Fourth St. Garage 

423 4th St., near Harrison St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Excellent Service 

Convenient 

Spacious 

Tires and Accessories 

PHONE GARFIELD 600 




From the quarry where the 
rough granite is hewn, 
ihrough the processes o( 
drilling, cutting, sawing, 
carving, and polishing, to 
the final assembly and fab- 
rication into the Memorial, 
one organization demon- 
strates by consistent success 
the value of this single re- 
sponsibility for design, man- 
ufacture, and installation. 
One standard, therefore, 
governs the design and man- 
ufacture of the materials as 
well as the engineering and 
construction service. 

Booklet "DN" on Memo- 
jpdj| rials, sent on request. 

RAYMOND GRANITE COMPANY, Inc. 

CONTRACTORS 

GRANITE— STONE— BUILDING— MEMORIAL 

3 Polrero Avenue, San Francisco. 1350 Palmetto Street, Los Angeles. 



RESPONSIBILITY 



Established 25 Years. 



Swimming, Rain or Fog 

Won't cause you any worry if 
you have your 

HAIR 

Permanently Waved 

at 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

Keamy 2842 San Francisco. 

Berkeley Store 233 1 Telegraph 



We Stand for the Best in Business Training 




SI School 



Munson 



..for.. 

Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 

fur Catalog 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



FINEST LINE OF 

Shrubbery Rose Bushes 

Bedding Plants 
Flower and Garden Seeds 



Bay Counties Seed Co. 

404 MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Paper, and Manuscript Coven f g^tt jFrattriflfD QUirOtttrlg 



The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than seems necessary." The 
typewriter paper* are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through you. printer or stationer, or, if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the tntire 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 



line. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 



A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for 90 cents a 

month — including Sunday edition!. 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster. 



37-45 FIRST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 




TER 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1921 



No. 10 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 259 Minna Street, near Fourth. San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second- 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year, $5.00. Foreign: One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

Sullivan and Oppenheim recalled. "Next!" Don't all rise at 

once, Supervisors. 



Why is it necessary to have so much reiteration of the Allies' 

intention to pay Uncle Sam? Who's holding them back? Step up 
to the cash counter, gents; no dog will bite you. 



The decent vote of San Francisco always turns the scales when 

the citizens are aroused. 



Never forget for one moment that the power of politicians to 

tax conveys the power to confiscate. 



Hark from the tombs! "If I were Harding!" cries old Bill 

Bryan, through three columns of advice in the Examiner. Thank 
God, you ain't. Bill! 



Hearst hasn't yet discovered that Japan must be at the bottom 

of the black-and-tan troubles in Ireland. There's an opportunity 
William is overlooking. 



If Coffroth and Bassity are unable to run their racetrack in 

Mexico, they might sell pools in their San Francisco rooms on the 
length of time Herbert Hoover stays in the new Cabinet. 



-How can Herbert Hoover find time for relief work in Central 



European countries and develop the Department of Commerce? He 
must be the super-superman his rooters believe. 



Whatever criticisms may be made on President Harding's t ah- 

inet, no one can say that he also has developed a genius in finding 
small politicians for big offices. 



The unemployment in England is tragic. A million hands 

stretching out for work — a million mouths to feed, and Lloyd George 
and his colleagues give them — hot air. 



When San Francisco is bankrupt and our fair California is on 

her uppers, citizens may begin to ask themselves what they have 
been doing to stop the public robbery. 



If a swarm of taxeaters at Sacramento can eat up powerful 

corporations, what can they do to the owner of a little house and 
lot, where he is struggling to raise a family? 



Wreathed